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Inverted Odysseys: Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Cindy Sherman
Shelley Rice (Editor)
0262681064
November 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
The three experimental artists examined here all use self-transformation, role playing, and societal commentary as devices to explore identity. Part critical essay and part exhibit catalog (Rice cocurated the show at New York University), this book spans the century through the three women's work, beginning with writer/photographer Cahun, moving ahead with midcentury filmmaker Deren, and closing with contemporary photographer Sherman. The enlightening contributions by well-known art critics and writers range from an academic discussion of lesbianism as a cultural determinate of Cahun's approach, to a diaristic examination of Deren, to a narrative role play exploring intent in Sherman's work. Also included is the full text of Cahun's farcical "Heroines," published here in its entirety for the first time....


Don't Kiss Me: The Art of Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore
Claude Cahun (Photographer)
1597110256
June 2006
Hardcover
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Bachelors
Rosalind E. Krauss
0262611651
August 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
The esteemed Krauss (art, Columbia) is prominent in the field of deconstructionist, feminist, and psychoanalytical art criticism. This collection of her essays applies the theories to nine women artists, neo-Duchampian "bachelors" who mostly practiced photography, sculpture, and some filmmaking and painting. The artists distinguished by this complex rhetorical discourse include Claude Cahun, Dora Maar, Louise Bourgeois, Agnes Martin, Eva Hesse, Cindy Sherman, Francesca Woodman, Sherrie Levine, and Louise Lawler. Krauss demonstrates how each achieved the "feminization" of the male gaze. Although the formal notation of semiological analysis is clarified in an endnote, from the beginning Krauss assumes her readers to be totally conversant with and attuned to the scholasticism of postmodern art theory. Appropriate...


Bachelors (October Books)
Rosalind E. Krauss
0262112396
January 1999
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
The esteemed Krauss (art, Columbia) is prominent in the field of deconstructionist, feminist, and psychoanalytical art criticism. This collection of her essays applies the theories to nine women artists, neo-Duchampian "bachelors" who mostly practiced photography, sculpture, and some filmmaking and painting. The artists distinguished by this complex rhetorical discourse include Claude Cahun, Dora Maar, Louise Bourgeois, Agnes Martin, Eva Hesse, Cindy Sherman, Francesca Woodman, Sherrie Levine, and Louise Lawler. Krauss demonstrates how each achieved the "feminization" of the male gaze. Although the formal notation of semiological analysis is clarified in an endnote, from the beginning Krauss assumes her readers to be totally conversant with and attuned to the scholasticism of postmodern art theory. Appropriate...


Gender Nonconformity, Race, and Sexuality: Charting the Connections
Toni P. Lester
0299181405
February 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
How are culturally constructed stereotypes about appropriate sex-based behavior formed? If a person who is biologically female behaves in a stereotypically masculine manner, what are the social, political, and cultural forces that may police her behavior? And how will she manage her gendered image in response to that policing? Finally, how do race, ethnicity, or sexuality inform the way that sex-based roles are constructed, policed, or managed? The chapters in this book address such questions from social science perspectives and then examine personal stories of reinvention and transformation, including discussions of the lives of dancers Isadora Duncan and Bill T. Jones, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, and surrealist artist Claude Cahun. Writers from fields as diverse as history, art, psychology, law, literature,...


Gender Nonconformity, Race, and Sexuality: Charting the Connections
Toni P. Lester
0299181448
February 2003
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
How are culturally constructed stereotypes about appropriate sex-based behavior formed? If a person who is biologically female behaves in a stereotypically masculine manner, what are the social, political, and cultural forces that may police her behavior? And how will she manage her gendered image in response to that policing? Finally, how do race, ethnicity, or sexuality inform the way that sex-based roles are constructed, policed, or managed? The chapters in this book address such questions from social science perspectives and then examine personal stories of reinvention and transformation, including discussions of the lives of dancers Isadora Duncan and Bill T. Jones, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, and surrealist artist Claude Cahun. Writers from fields as diverse as history, art, psychology, law, literature,...


Male/Female: 105 Photographs
Vince Aletti (Introduction)
089381881X
September 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
No age has explored the spectrum of gender with its infinite nuances and variety as ours has.

Humankind's first and most essential dichotomy-that we are created in two natures, male and female-has fascinated artists since the Willendorf sculptor shaped his Venus as unmistakably female. Each sex has connoted different powers and lures over the ages.

Male/Female combines portraits, snapshots, collages, and everything in between to generate a visual conversation that moves fluidly throughout the history of photography. The images utilize intensive self-reflection, humor, and iconic forms to articulate countless expressions of gender. Male/Female features an extensive interview with Madonna and an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum, as well as excerpts from the work of many of today's foremost thinkers....


Mirror Images: Women, Surrealism, and Self-Representation
Whitney Chadwick (Editor)
0262531577
April 1998
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Seven essays are published here, one contributed by Chadwick herself, a well-known specialist on women artists who were part of the surrealist movement. The resulting anthology, which serves as a catalog to an exhibition traveling from fall 1998 through early 1999, is a fairly comprehensive look at the self-portraiture of contemporary women using feminist critical theory. The essayists find strong links between modernist historical Surrealism and contemporary women artists while highlighting the strategies of "displacement, doubling, fragmentation, and fetishizing of the baby" that frequently appear in works by Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Louise Bourgeois, Dorothy Cross, and Ana Mendieta, among others. Of widest interest are the essays on Marcel Duchamp/Rose Selavy, Claude Cahun, and Cindy Sherman and Frida Kahlo....


Picturing the Self: Changing Views of the Subject in Visual Culture
Gen Doy
1850434123
December 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Ideas of selfhood, from Descartes to postmodern notions of the fragmented and de-centred self, have been crucial to the visual arts. Gen Doy explores this relationship, primarily in relation to contemporary art but also going back to the early modern period and Holbein's Ambassadors. She argues that the importance of subjectivity for art goes far beyond self-portraits, exploring the self and identity--both the artist's and the viewer's--and seeks a way of thinking the self that goes beyond both Cartesian and postmodern approaches to subjecthood. She looks too at work and consumption; self-presentation; photography and the theatre of the self; the marginalized--beggars and asylum seekers--and "the real me." A wide range of artists, including Claude Cahun, Tracey Emin, Jeff Wall, Barbara Kruger, Eugene Palmer and Karen...


Picturing the Self: Changing Views of the Subject in Visual Culture
Gen Doy
1850434131
December 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Ideas of selfhood, from Descartes to postmodern notions of the fragmented and de-centred self, have been crucial to the visual arts. Gen Doy explores this relationship, primarily in relation to contemporary art but also going back to the early modern period and Holbein's Ambassadors. She argues that the importance of subjectivity for art goes far beyond self-portraits, exploring the self and identity--both the artist's and the viewer's--and seeks a way of thinking the self that goes beyond both Cartesian and postmodern approaches to subjecthood. She looks too at work and consumption; self-presentation; photography and the theatre of the self; the marginalized--beggars and asylum seekers--and "the real me." A wide range of artists, including Claude Cahun, Tracey Emin, Jeff Wall, Barbara Kruger, Eugene Palmer and Karen...

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