Book Finder
    
 
> Art > Artists & Musicians & A-Z > Gentileschi Artemisia
 

Passion of Artemisia
Susan Vreeland
0142001821
December 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Like her bestselling debut, Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Susan Vreeland's second novel, The Passion of Artemisia, traces a particular painting through time: in this case, the post-Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi's violent masterpiece, "Judith." Although the novel purports to cover the life of the painter, the painting serves as a touchstone, foreshadowing Artemisia's rape by Agostino Tassi, an assistant in her father's painting studio in Rome; the well-documented (and humiliating) trial that followed; the early days of her hastily arranged marriage; and her eventual triumph as the first woman elected to the Accademia dell' Arte in Florence. Although Vreeland makes a bit free with her characters (which she admits in her introduction), attributing some decidedly modern attitudes to people who would not have thought that...


Artemisia
Alexandra Lapierre
0802138578
September 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Small wonder that biographer Alexandra Lapierre was drawn to write about Artemisia Gentileschi, one of the first female painters to gain acclaim in the male-dominated 17th-century art world. Her story has all the ingredients of high drama: rape, jealousy, and an infamous court trial set against a backdrop of art and passion. Meticulously researched, framed in a fictional context, Lapierre's treatment applies a painterly touch to a scholarly work. Billed as a biography in the U.K. but as a novel in the U.S., it combines the rigor of one genre with the page-turning immediacy of the other.

Born in Rome to the artist Orazio Gentileschi and his wife Prudenzia, Artemisia's life was turned upside down after the death of her mother. Orazio jealously guarded his only daughter, refusing her outside contact even as he ...



Artemisia
Anna Banti
0803262132
December 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The reissue, in translation, of Ital- ian art historian Banti's imaginative recreation of the life of artist Artemisia Gentileschi (1590-1642), initially published in 1947, is well deserved. This sensitive work of psychological portraiture, fluently translated by Caracciolo, is an intricate, self-reflective work of art. Banti fuses Artemisia's life with her own in Nazi-occupied Italy in a richly complex, historical narrative present, entering into dialogues with her heroine on how best to present her life, and on the nature and limitations of biography. As an unhappy adolescent in Rome, starved for love from her aloof father Orazio, a prominent artist, Artemisia allows herself to be seduced and is publicly humiliated for losing her "virtue." Hastily married off for form's sake, she is removed by the contemptuous...


Artemisia Gentileschi
Mary D. Garrard
0691002851
Jan 1991
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Garrard's in-depth study of Renaissance/Baroque painter Gentileschi is both timely and necessary. First, Garrard examines the life and work of the painter: the training with her artist father, the debt to Michelangelo and Caravaggio, the biblical and classical themes prevalent among her contemporaries, stylistic concerns, and her popularity, much-publicized rape, and influence. Then, using this information as context, Garrard proceeds to interpret the pictorial and spiritual contents of Gentileschi's paintings, contending that, while no one gainsays Gentileschi's skill, her true genius lies in her ability to empower mythic-heroic female subjects with "female artistic intelligence." In her novel, based on Gentileschi's life, Banti attempts to understand her own world, that of World War II Italy, through an...


Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi
Keith Christiansen
0300090773
December 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
This book, which accompanies an exhibition currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and traveling both to the St. Louis Art Museum and to the Museo di Palazzo di Venezia in Rome, is the first to examine in one volume both Orazio and Artemesia Gentileschi, father-and-daughter artists of 17th-century Italy. The catalog demonstrates that Orazio Gentileschi follows the Caravaggesque practice of painting from the model, which Artemesia in turn absorbed into her own painting methods. At the same time, curator Christiansen concludes that Orazio painted much more in the elegant style of classical painting in France and never accepted the Baroque idioms of drama and expressiveness that his daughter Artemesia wholeheartedly embraced in her painting. Also discussed in this catalog is the feminist aspect of...


The Artemisia Files: Artemisia Gentileschi for Feminists and Other Thinking People
Mieke Bal (Editor)
0226035816
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
Mary Sheriff : "The Artemisia Files makes an important contribution to the current debates surrounding Artemisia Gentileschi. This collection of essays has a potential audience not only of scholars in art history, gender and women's studies, and cultural history but also of the more general public. It brings together a group of noted scholars whose work has energized and charged the entire discipline of art history."--Mary Sheriff, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Keith Christiansen : "Over the last generation Artemisia has been transformed from a talented curiosity-a successful female artist working in the seventeenth century-into a standard bearer of early feminist consciousness. This book offers a fascinating glimpse into the critical frame of mind underlying this transformation."-Keith Christiansen, Jayne...


Artemisia Gentileschi
Judith W. Mann
250351507X
Mar 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Contents: Judith W. Mann, Introduction; R. Ward Bissell, Re-thinking Early Artemisia; Patrizia Cavazzini, The Other Women in Agostino Tassi's Life; Judith W. Mann , The Myth of Artemisia as Chameleon: A new Look at the London Allegory of Painting; Riccardo Lattuada and Eduardo Nappi, New Documents and Some Remarks on Artemisia's Production in Naples and elsewhere; Mary D. Garrard, Artemisia's Hand; Elizabeth Cohen, "What's in a Name?..."; Ann Sutherland Harris, Artemisia and Orazio: Drawing Conclusions; Richard Spear, Money Matters; Alexandra Lapierre, Artemisia: Art, Facts and Fictions.


Artemisia Gentileschi around 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity
Mary D. Garrard
0520228413
February 2001
Paperback
·
 
The Art Book
"An interesting book [that] certainly contributes to our further understanding and appreciation of the outstanding achievements of Artemesia Gentileschi." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
Mary D. Garrard, author of the acclaimed Artemisia Gentileschi, furthers her study of the seventeenth-century artist in this groundbreaking investigation of two little-known paintings. Taking as case studies the Seville Mary Magdalene and the Burghley House Susanna and the Elders, paintings of circa 1621-22 attributed to Artemisia, Garrard examines the ways that identity, gender, and market pressures interact both in the artist's work and in the criticism and connoisseurship that have surrounded it.

See...


A Rare and Curious Gift
Pauline Holdstock
0393327477
February 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The quest to possess beauty drives this debut historical novel, which borrows from the life of Artemisia Gentileschi, a gifted painter of the Italian Renaissance who was one of the first women to gain recognition as an artist in her own right. Holdstock's heroine is Sofonisba, daughter of the painter Orazio Fabroni. At 17, Sofonisba is taking on more and more of her father's work, attempting to cultivate her own talent. Her passions are aroused by the scruffy, swashbuckling sculptor Matteo Tassi, whose wandering and carefree ways suit her independent nature. When an exotic slave with freakish, piebald skin enters the lives of these artists, their fascination with the slave as an object of both beauty and repulsion sets off a spiraling chain of events that leads many to believe the girl is a curse upon the town....


Life without Instruction
Sally Clark
0889223475
February 1994
Paperback
·
 


The Passion of Artemesia
Susan Vreeland
1565115252
January 2002
Audio
·
 
Book Review
Like her bestselling debut, Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Susan Vreeland's second novel, The Passion of Artemisia, traces a particular painting through time: in this case, the post-Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi's violent masterpiece, "Judith." Although the novel purports to cover the life of the painter, the painting serves as a touchstone, foreshadowing Artemisia's rape by Agostino Tassi, an assistant in her father's painting studio in Rome; the well-documented (and humiliating) trial that followed; the early days of her hastily arranged marriage; and her eventual triumph as the first woman elected to the Accademia dell' Arte in Florence. Although Vreeland makes a bit free with her characters (which she admits in her introduction), attributing some decidedly modern attitudes to people who would not have thought that...


Passion of Artemesia
Susan Vreeland
1565115260
January 2002
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
Like her bestselling debut, Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Susan Vreeland's second novel, The Passion of Artemisia, traces a particular painting through time: in this case, the post-Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi's violent masterpiece, "Judith." Although the novel purports to cover the life of the painter, the painting serves as a touchstone, foreshadowing Artemisia's rape by Agostino Tassi, an assistant in her father's painting studio in Rome; the well-documented (and humiliating) trial that followed; the early days of her hastily arranged marriage; and her eventual triumph as the first woman elected to the Accademia dell' Arte in Florence. Although Vreeland makes a bit free with her characters (which she admits in her introduction), attributing some decidedly modern attitudes to people who would not have thought that...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.