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Arshile Gorky
Melvin P. Lader
1558592490
August 1990
Paperback
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Arshile Gorky: His Life and Work
Hayden Herrera
0374529728
January 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Most recently seen as a silent, enigmatic figure in the Armenian-Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan's Ararat, modernist painter Gorky (1900?-1948) is fastidiously served in this comprehensive biography. Born near Lake Van in Ottoman-held Armenia, the young Gorky witnessed the Armenian genocide, a horror that Herrera (Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo) covers with extreme care. Following Gorky's emigration to the U.S. in 1920 and his name change from Manouk Adoian (he claimed to be the cousin of Russian writer Maxim Gorky), Herrera establishes the bulk of the narrative around Gorky's paintings, describing what he was working on when and under what circumstances. Most of Gorky's work life was based in New York, where, by the 1930s, he was paid a salary by the WPA for murals and other work in his surrealist style,...


Black Angel: The Life of Arshile Gorky
Nouritza Matossian
1585672858
September 2002
Paperback
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New York Review of Books
Brings us closer to to Gorky's origins and the sources of his art.

The New York Times
Matossian has a knack for describing the formal and the physical aspects of a painting or drawing.

See all Editorial Reviews


Arshile Gorky
Janie C. Lee
0874271355
Nov 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Arshile Gorky (1904-1948) was a seminal figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. His drawings are beautiful, complex, and sensual creations, the products of a technical mastery that bespoke a new power of abstraction within modern art. They are also pivotal to the understanding of his art and play a major part in the development and realization of his paintings. This handsome volume, and the exhibition it accompanies-the first retrospective ever assembled of this influential artist's drawings-focus on how Gorky's drawings function both in relation to his paintings and as individual works of art. Gorky's changing styles and precise approach to drawing are discussed in detail, and contrasted with the spontaneous and direct execution generally associated with Abstract Expressionism. The works range from small,...


From a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky
Matthew Spender
0520225481
September 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Purely out of artistic ambition, Armenian-American abstract painter Gorky (1895-1948; born in Turkey as Vostanig Adoian) fabricated a new identity, complete with an Ivy League education and personal histories with master artists, on arriving in the United States. Spender (Within Tuscany), who is married to Gorky's oldst daughter, unhesitatingly exposes the painter's many "tall tales." He also assesses Gorky's difficulty in arriving at his own aesthetic until late in life in terms of both the artist's ties to the artistic patriarchs of the previous generation, the Surrealists (including Breton, Duchamp and Brancusi) and his complex status as a forerunner who eventually became alienated from the New York Abstract Expressionists (particularly de Kooning and Rothko). Spender derives much information from anecdotal...


After Mountains and Sea: Frankenthaler 1956-1959
Julia Brown
0892072709
August 1998
Hardcover
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Black Angel
Nouritza Matossian
1585670065
Apr 2000
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
An admired outsider among the New York school of painters in the 1940s, Gorky (1902-1948) has long been a cipher as a person, in part due to his constant self-disguises. Born Manoug Adoian in Armenia, he survived the horrific 1915 massacre of Armenians by Turks, as well as subsequent famines, only to disguise his past once he reached America in the 1920s. Presenting himself as a cousin of the writer Maxim Gorky, he convinced friends he was Russian, despite his ignorance of that language. Now arts journalist Matossian (Iannis Xenakis) clears up a good part of the mystery, armed with a reading knowledge of Armenian that past writers have often lacked. Matossian proves that past sources on Gorky's life, such as letters published by a nephew, were forgeries. She probes deeply and without sentiment into the tragic...


After Mountains and Sea: Frankenthaler, 1956-1959
Staff of Guggenheim Museum
0810969114
August 1998
Hardcover
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Hans Hofmann
Karen Wilkin
0807615269
December 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Hans Hofmann's art "has the authority of pure vision. Van Gogh had that. Picasso has it. And Hans Hofmann also has a place with those giants who move straight into the light without being blinded by it."—Tennessee Williams, 1949 The painter Hans Hofmann (1880-1966) is one of the most important figures in post-war American art. In his lifetime, he came to be admired for his exuberant, color-filled canvases, but it was as an influential teacher, first in his native Germany, later in New York and Provincetown, that he was most renowned. Today, he is celebrated a giant of twentieth-century abstraction, and his pivotal role, along with Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Arshile Gorky, in the development of Abstract Expressionism is widely acknowledged. Published to accompany a retrospective of the artist's work...


The Imagery of Chess Revisited
Larry List
0807615552
November 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Imagery of Chess Revisited recovers a celebrated and extraordinary moment in art history: the 1944-45 exhibition The Imagery of Chess, held at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York City. The exhibit was a legend in its own time and has been considered a singular event in the history of art exhibitions ever since. The show's organizers—the influential art dealer Julien Levy, the Surrealist painter Max Ernst, and Dada leader Marcel Duchamp, himself a serious chess player—invited a virtual "who's who" of artists and members of the cultural avant-garde to redesign the standard chess set or otherwise explore chess imagery and its symbolism in bold new ways. Participants included famous European expatriates and soon-to-be famous American modernists: André Breton, Duchamp, Alexander Calder, Ernst, Man Ray,...


Julien Levy: Portrait of an Art Gallery
Ingrid Schaffner (Editor)
0262194120
November 1998
Hardcover
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Book Description
Julien Levy (1906-1981) was one of the most influential art dealers of the twentieth century. The Julien Levy Gallery, which opened in New York in 1931 and closed in 1949, played an essential role in the shift of the cultural avant-garde from Paris to New York. It was the first American gallery to sponsor a show on Surrealism and to champion Neoromanticism, Magic Realism, and Machine Abstraction. Luis Buñuel's film Un Chien Andalou and Joseph Cornell's Rose Hobart were first screened in the gallery. Among the artists Levy exhibited were Eugene Atget, Constantin Brancusi, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Joseph Cornell, Salvador Dali, Walt Disney, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Walker Evans, Leonor Fini, Naum Gabo, Alberto Giacometti, Arshile Gorky, Frida Kahlo, Fernand Léger, René Magritte, Lee Miller,...


The Last Good Freudian
Brenda Webster
0841913951
March 2000
Hardcover
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From Kirkus Reviews
Soul-bearing memoirs of a woman ``born and brought up to be in psychoanalysis,'' who discovers rather late in life that writing fiction has taught her more about herself than years of psychotherapy. Webster (Sins of the Mother, 1993; Paradise Farm, 1999) was born in New York in the 1930s into a family of wealthy nonobservant Jewsher mother an abstract painter and disciple of Ashile Gorky and her father an entertainment lawyerand grew up in a segment of New York society immersed in the culture of psychiatry. ``It became, in effect, our family faith,'' she writes, noting that her anxious, temperamental mother was in therapy with a Freudian analyst five days a week for 30 years. At 14, Webster had her own therapist. Her portrait of her eccentric mother is compelling, as is her description of her own therapy-ridden...

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