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An George Grosz: An Autobiography
George Grosz
0520213270
April 1998
Paperback
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Mark Levy, San Francisco Chronicle Review
"[A] vitriolic yet appreciative memoir of his artistic education, artistic and literary friends, and ideological flirtations."

Book Description
This acclaimed autobiography by one of the twentieth century's greatest satirical artists is as much a graphic portrait of Germany in chaos after the Treaty of Versailles as it is a memoir of a remarkable artist's development. Grosz's account of a world gone mad is as acute and provocative as the art that depicts it, and this translation of a work long out of print restores the spontaneity, humor, and energy of the author's German text. It also includes a chapter on Grosz's experience in the Soviet Union--omitted from the original English-language edition--as well as more writings about his twenty-year...


Grosz
Manufactured by Taschen
3822808911
November 2003
Paperback
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Berlin of George Grosz: Drawings, Watercolours and Prints, 1912-1930
Frank Whitford (Editor)
0300072066
August 1997
Hardcover
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The New York Times Book Review, Ted Loos
Few artists have truly defined an era. George Grosz, the great truth-teller of Weimar Germany and the early Nazi years, came as close as any.... Though full of dark humor, many of the images retain their power to shock.

From Kirkus Reviews
This volume demonstrates how brilliantly Grosz caught the life, and more importantly the feverish imagination, of a city and a nation in a particularly turbulent time. Marrying the jumpy lines and figural distortions of cubism to narrative subjects and an angry sense of morality, he illuminated the tawdry, often violent, lives of Berlin's down-and-out, its powerbrokers, and its murderers, during the chaotic Weimar years of the 1920s, in corrosive, unsettling, kinetic images. The drawings and prints of drunken...


Berlin-New York
Alexander Duckers
3894790547
March 1996
Hardcover
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Language Notes
Text: German


Lustmord: Sexual Murder in Weimar Germany
Maria M. Tatar
0691015902
May 1997
Paperback
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Patrice Petro, Art in America
A compelling chronicle of Weimar Germany's disturbing and pervasive fascination with the sexually motivated murder of women, Lustmord breaks new ground in our understanding of German art and culture during this turbulent period between the two world wars.... Tatar has written a brilliant book of art and cultural criticism, a book that scholars and theorists of the Weimar period will have to contend with for some years to come.

Barbara Kosta, The Women's Review of Books
Tatar's book is particularly relevant today, amid the heated debates over violence, even as the images become more brutal and sensational, and the camera more voyeuristic and merciless.

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Arcadia and the Metropolis: Masterpieces from the National Galerie Berlin
Neue Galerie (Editor)
3791330411
March 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
This penetrating examination of two major themes in the Expressionist and Neue Sachlichkeit movements traces German artists’ varied responses to their country’s abrupt encounter with industrialization and urbanization. Few artistic movements mirror the social and political climates of their emergence as much as German Expressionism and Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity). This exhibition catalog presents a selection of important paintings, covering the period from 1907 to 1926, from one of Germany’s major collections of twentieth-century art. The thirty-four paintings presented here include works by Kirchner, Nolde, Pechstein, Dix, Groz, Schmidt-Rottluff, Heckel, and Beckmann. Arranged chronologically, and with in-depth explanatory texts, they allow readers to trace the evolution of German...


The Forbidden Pictures
Larry Fink (Photographer)
1576872440
November 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
"It was time - the election was stolen, robbed by middle-men on top. Folks who though the past was the future because they owned the present. Entitlement didn't come from being lazy; it came from cunning, aggrandizing connivance. The leader was a twice entitles frat boy, a thick-headed intellectual goon, with charisma informed by homily and stubborn gotcha comfort." - Larry Fink. Originally conceived as a scathing comment on the 2000 presidential election, "The Forbidden Pictures" by Larry Fink were set to run in The New York Times Magazine in the fall of 2001. Then, after the tragic events of September 11 and the ensuing reluctance for criticism found in the media and general public, these images remained largely unseen until their exhibition, first at Lehigh University, Pennsylvania in the spring of 2004, then the...


German Expressionism: Documents from the of the Wilhelmine Empire to the Rise of National Socialism
Rose-Carol Washton Long
0520202643
October 1995
Paperback
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Book Description
German Expressionism, one of the most significant movements of early European modernism, was an enormously powerful element in Germany's cultural life from the end of the Wilhelmine Empire to the Third Reich. While the movement embraced such diverse artists as E. L. Kirchner, Wassily Kandinsky, Käthe Kollwitz, and George Grosz, all the participants shared an almost messianic belief in the power of art to change society. Rose-Carol Washton Long has drawn together over eighty documents crucial to the understanding of German Expressionism, many of them translated for the first time into English.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: German

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The German Print Portfolio 1890-1930: Serials for a Private Sphere
Richard A. Born (Editor)
0856674176
May 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
A comprehensive examination of the print portfolio as an art form.


Hannah Hoch: Album
Hannah Hoch (Illustrator)
3775714278
April 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
As one of the protagonists of the Berlin Dada movement, Hannah Höch railed against tradition and conservatism in 1920s Germany. Höch and such cohorts as George Grosz and Raoul Hausmann raised anarchic revolution through cutting photomontage, nonsensical performance, and biting visual satire. A singular and important work in the artist's oeuvre is the so-called "Sammelalbum," which she produced and pasted together from found imagery for her own pleasure and use, circa 1933. In it, she arranged a choice selection of newspaper and magazine photographs cut from popular German magazines of the time, such as the Berliner Illustrirte and Der Dame. A diverse, allusive group of images they are, representing everything from her favorite film stars to oddly captured animals and toy dolls, nudes, landscapes, scenic...

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