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The 'Divine' Guido
Richard E. Spear
0300070357
Jan 1998
Hardcover
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The Atlantic Monthly, Phoebe-Lou Adams
The author is a professor of art history with an unusual approach to his subject, Guido Reni (1575-1642). He discusses the interlocking effects of "Religion, Sex, Money and Art" in the work of a painter who was violently pious, an addicted gambler always greedy for money, a believer in witchcraft, a homosexual by inclination (not necessarily by practice), and a man very testy about his social status. Not an attractive figure. The author attempts to sort out how much of Reni's conduct is attributable to ideas common at the time and how much can be considered the painter's personal invention. The discussion is most interesting when the author concentrates on his own reading of Reni's work (excellently illustrated) and his interpretation of Reni's actions, less so when he depends on...


Guido Reni's Abduction of Helen: The Politics and Rhetoric of Painting in Seventeenth-Century Europe
Anthony Colantuono
0521563976
May 1997
Hardcover
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Review
'... an enjoyable, yet challenging, examination into the historical, political and literary context of one particular work which stands as an exemplum of a particular genre of seventeenth-century painting.' The Art Book

Book Description
This study explores how Guido Reni's Abduction of Helen functioned as an instrument of political rhetoric in the context of diplomatic relations among Spain, France and the Holy See during the Thirty Years War. The painting was commissioned amidst diplomatic negotiations between the Spanish monarchy and the papacy of Pope Urban VIII. The papacy, the author argues, sought to control the artist's interpretation of his subject--the famous event that caused the Trojan War--by transforming it into a political metaphor alluding to the war between France and...


Quattrocento Adriatico: Fifteenth-Century Art of the Adriatic Rim
Charles Dempsey (Editor)
8877790520
March 1996
Hardcover
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Book Description
The papers collected in this book provide many new observations about the artistic interrelationship between Italy and the cities of the Dalmatian coast during the fifteenth century, with special attention given to the influence on both sides of the Adriatic of the styles of Donatello in sculpture, Squarcione in painting, and Alberti in architecture. Essays are devoted to fifteenth-century painting in Dalmatia and its ties to the opposite shore; to the centrality of Padua in diffusing artistic ideas throughout the Adriatic; to Venetian sovereignty over Dalmatia; to Renaissance villas on the Dalmatian coast; to the architectural activity of Michelozzo and his shop in Dubrovnik; to the Chapel of the Planets in the Tempio Malatestiano at Rimini; to the Chapel of the Blessed Giovanni Orsini at Trogir; to Niccolò di...


Giovan Pietro Bellori: The Lives of the Modern Painter's, Sculptors, and Architects: A New Translation and Critical Edition
Giovan Pietro Bellori
0521781876
August 2005
Hardcover
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Review
“The translation of this very important book is accompanied by a superb introduction by Montanari, engrossing reading for all students of the Baroque. The combination of the synthetic essay and the primary source newly edited yields a work that is absolutely essential for all libraries that collect art history.”
Choice

Book Description
Including Annibale Carracci, Caravaggio, Rubens, Van Dyck, and Poussin, this first complete translation of the biographies of fifteen artists by Giovan Pietro Bellori will be a fundamental source of seventeenth-century Italian art and artistic theory. With detailed descriptions of extant and lost works of art, the importance of Bellori's Lives of the Artists lies in the scrupulous documentation of the artists (many of whom he knew...


Roman Murder Mystery
Derek Parker
0750925825
June 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
In January 1698, Romans crowded a city church to view two brutally murdered elderly people and their dying 18-year-old daughter, Pompilia. What followed was the most celebrated trial of its time. The defense argued that Pompilia was an adulteress, husband deserter, and mother of an illegitimate son, grounds for which a husband could rightfully murder, but five men, including Pompilia's elderly husband, were convicted. Using comtemporary sources, Parker questions whether she was a saint or sinner.

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