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Mark Rothko
Jeffrey Weiss
0300081936
August 2000
Paperback
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From Booklist
Rothko's most famous paintings are profoundly contemplative works, rectangles of vibrant color that seem lit from within and that are full of subtle energy and life, like the sky or the surface of a lake. This handsome retrospective catalog of his work, which includes his early representational paintings as well as his harmonic abstractions, has been published in conjunction with a major traveling exhibition of his work and contains more than 100 colorplates. Weiss has wisely placed the art before the commentary, allowing readers to absorb the quiet impact of Rothko's work before seeking explanations of the man and his still controversial creations in essays by Weiss, John Cage, Barbara Novak and Brian O'Doherty, and Carol Mancusi-Ungaro. Interviews with painters Ellsworth Kelly, Gerhard Richter, and Robert Ryman attest...


Seeing Rothko
Glenn Phillips
0892367342
Nov 2005
Paperback
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Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art
Mark Rothko
0300102534
September 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
Mark Rothko, the painter famous for his luminous abstract canvases, spent several years in the late 1930s and early '40s writing a book about the meaning of art. Edited by his son Christopher, Rothko's uncompleted manuscript, The Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art, reveals a man struggling to make a case for the highest ideals of Western culture at a time when crass popular taste and American regionalism were conspiring against the values he held dear. During these years, Rothko worked in a melancholy Expressionist style that was just beginning to be influenced by Surrealism. The hovering rectangles of color that would put him on the modern art map were still a decade away. While this book will no doubt be important to Rothko scholars, it is a period piece, relying on a form of rhetoric and a belief system that can be...


Mark Rothko
Manufactured by Taschen
382283047X
September 2003
Paperback
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From the Back Cover
"A beautiful Rothko does to the eyes what beautiful food does to the tastebuds." - The Guardian First printed in 1987 in conjunction with a major exhibition by the Tate Gallery of London, this revised edition of "Mark Rothko" is the definitive catalog examining the work of one of the most influential abstract artist of the twentieth century. Here are over 90 full-color plates spanning nearly forty years of Rothko's life and art. Accompanying these extraordinary works are fascinating and revealing contributions by those best qualified for commentary, including essays from distinguished professors Irving Sandler and Robert Rosenblum: staff members of the Rothko Foundation, Bonnie Clearwater and Dana Cranmer: leading critics David Sylvester and Robert Goldwater: and, most importantly, from Rothko himself. A...


The Essential Mark Rothko
Klaus Ottmann
0810958260
April 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Mark Rothko (1903-1970) is generally considered, along with Jackson Pollock, the preeminent artist of the group of painters who, during the 1940s and '50s, re-invented American art and became known as the Abstract Expressionists. Yet despite his success--people cried when they stood in front of his sublimely spiritual canvases--he suffered from intense anxiety and depression, and eventually took his own life.


Mark Rothko
Anna C. Chave
0300049617
Jan 1989
Paperback
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Mark Rothko
James E. B. Breslin
0226074064
April 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
"I became a painter because I wanted to raise painting to the level of poignancy of music and poetry." Born Marcus Rothkowitz in a small Russian town, Mark Rothko immigrated to Portland, Oregon, in 1913, when he was 10 years old. "You don't know what it is to be a Jewish kid dressed in a suit that is a Dvinsk, not an American, idea of a suit traveling across America and not able to speak English," he later told fellow abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell. Rothko was a weak child, an abandoned son (his father had gone to America in 1910 and died of cancer just seven months after the family was reunited), a Jew excluded from high school clubs, a Yale freshman on scholarship, and a college dropout determined to become an Artist with a capital A. James Breslin has written an exhaustive biography of the painter. He pulled...


Writings on Art
Mark Rothko
0300114400
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Rothko's multiform and abstract expressionist paintings make him one of the most important artists of the 20th century. Gathering all of the artist's writings held in public collections as well as texts in Rothko's descendants' hands, this book brings to light many of his theoretical stances, practical considerations and personal revelations. Arranged chronologically from 1934, the year after his first solo show, to 1969, the year before his suicide, the approximately 100 texts consist of letters to curators and to artists like Barnett Newman, Herbert Ferber and Robert Motherwell; notes about his approach to the teaching of art; and writings that explore art as a means of communication. Editor López-Remiro's introduction contextualizes the writings and doubles as a handy chronology of Rothko's life and...


Mark Rothko: The Works on Canvas: A Catalogue Raisonne
David Anfam
0300074891
September 1998
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
When Mark Rothko (1903-70) started his career in New York in the early 1920s, America had no established art. Before his tragic suicide, he completed a mural series for the Rothko Chapel commissioned by the de Menil family, accomplishing for American painting what the Monet water lilies did for French painting in the 1920s. Recently, Rothko has received renewed attention with a traveling retrospective from the National Gallery, currently at the Whitney Museum in New York. Anfam (Mark Rothko: The Chapel Commission, Menil Foundation, 1996) connects Rothko to major figures in art history with a historical, philosophical, literary, mythical, and psychological framework for the artist's development as a painter. Within the catalog itself the reproductions are grouped chronologically, with a complete concordance....


Mark Rothko: A Biography
James E.B. Breslin
0226074056
November 1993
Hardcover
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Book Review
"I became a painter because I wanted to raise painting to the level of poignancy of music and poetry." Born Marcus Rothkowitz in a small Russian town, Mark Rothko immigrated to Portland, Oregon, in 1913, when he was 10 years old. "You don't know what it is to be a Jewish kid dressed in a suit that is a Dvinsk, not an American, idea of a suit traveling across America and not able to speak English," he later told fellow abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell. Rothko was a weak child, an abandoned son (his father had gone to America in 1910 and died of cancer just seven months after the family was reunited), a Jew excluded from high school clubs, a Yale freshman on scholarship, and a college dropout determined to become an Artist with a capital A. James Breslin has written an exhaustive biography of the painter. He pulled...


The Artist's Reality
Mark Rothko
0300115857
Jan 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Mark Rothko, the painter famous for his luminous abstract canvases, spent several years in the late 1930s and early '40s writing a book about the meaning of art. Edited by his son Christopher, Rothko's uncompleted manuscript, The Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art, reveals a man struggling to make a case for the highest ideals of Western culture at a time when crass popular taste and American regionalism were conspiring against the values he held dear. During these years, Rothko worked in a melancholy Expressionist style that was just beginning to be influenced by Surrealism. The hovering rectangles of color that would put him on the modern art map were still a decade away. While this book will no doubt be important to Rothko scholars, it is a period piece, relying on a form of rhetoric and a belief system that can be...


The Killing Art
Jonathan Santlofer
0060541075
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
As in Santlofer's two previous crime novels (The Death Artist and Color Blind), his latest to star Kate McKinnon, a former NYPD detective turned art historian, brings the New York art world to sharply detailed life. Kate has given up her rich clients and is now writing a book about the New York School of painters of the 1930s. After someone slashes a painting by Willem de Kooning, which was loaned to a museum by Kate's late husband, she reluctantly returns to police work. She decides to help Det. Monty Murphy, the NYPD's entire art squad, find out who's behind this and other slashings, which include a Jackson Pollock, a Franz Kline and finally the collectors who owned the spoiled pictures. Kate and Monty make a believable pair of colleagues, and Santlofer's own black-and-white artwork advances the plot. His...


Legacy of Mark Rothko
Lee Seldes
0306807254
August 1996
Paperback
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Number 10
Mark Rothko
0789307766
Dec 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
Images from the Museum Of Modern Art Journal

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