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Associated Press Guide to Photojournalism, Vol. 2
Brian Horton
0071363874
October 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Written by noted AP photographer and photoeditor Brian Horton, this is an insider's manual to one of the most glamorous and exciting media professions. Emphasizing the creative process behind the photojournalist's art, Brian Horton draws upon his three decades of experience, as well as the experiences of other award-winning photojournalists, to instruct readers in the secrets of snapping memorable news photos every time. With the help of more than 100 photographs from the AP archives, he analyzes what constitutes successful news photos of every type, including portraits, tableaux, sports shots, battlefield scenes, and more, as well as offering tips on how to develop a style of your own.

Book Info
A guide to the art and craft of making excellent news photos, capturing...


Picture Taker
Ken Elkins
0817314784
Sept 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
The most famous monochrome photographs of rural Alabama are the images Walker Evans captured to accompany James Agee's prose-poetic report on Depression-era sharecropping, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941). They are famously stark and even grim, not at all like Elkins' pictures of mostly poor farming folk taken 25 to 50 years later. But then, Evans wasn't an Alabamian or ever more than passing through on assignment. Elkins hails from the state's northeastern corner, in which the people in his work live. His images are unsentimentally affectionate, and his subjects look at ease and often smile or otherwise emote, unlike the still, somber people in Evans' masterpieces. A career newspaper photographer, Elkins is very good at the perfect image caught on the fly. See the picture of a man in a boat who has just...


Things As They Are
Mary Panzer, Christian Caujolle
1597110140
February 7, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
When the World Press Photo organization wanted to issue a commemorative volume that would dynamically trace developments in the last half-century of photojournalism, they had a very good idea: instead of presenting just a selection of memorable images, they would also reproduce the context—the actual pages of newspapers and magazines—in which the images first appeared. The result is a resounding technical success; the volume is big enough to clearly reproduce a variety of formats while remaining comfortable to look through. The book is also exceptionally well edited, with spare but helpful texts, an intelligent mix of the familiar (Salgado's 1987 series of Brazilian miners for the London Sunday Times) and fairly obscure (Donna Ferrato's powerful Philadelphia Inquirer series on domestic violence from...


Truth Needs No Ally: Inside Photojournalism
Howard Chapnick
0826209556
July 1994
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Chapnick offers a substantial overview of photojournalism, including its history, professional responsibilities, and standards of conduct as well as examples of great photographic essays. He also discusses women and minorities in photojournalism, provides information on workshops, awards, and grants available in the field, and offers an abundance of cogent advice to those entering the field. As his title suggests, Chapnick argues for maintaining the highest ethical standards in this critical profession. At a time when we are flooded with the artificial glitz of advertising photography, it is refreshing to find a book that champions the strength of the photograph as document and as agent for positive social change. Essential for all academic libraries, especially those supporting journalism programs; public...


Inferno
James Nachtwey
0714838152
January 1, 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
Though he is probably the world's most honored recent war photographer, James Nachtwey calls himself an "antiwar photographer," as the preeminent critic Luc Sante notes in his excellent foreword to Inferno, a landmark collection of 382 war-crime photos. Nachtwey has taken shrapnel and had his hair literally parted by a bullet, but he's never lost his compassionate outrage. The stunning images in this huge-format book--brutally abused Romanian orphans, Rwandan genocide victims, a rat-hunter family of Indian Untouchables barbecuing dinner, skeletal dehydration victims in Sudan, the miserable in Bosnia, Chechnya, Zaire, Somalia, and Kosovo--are excruciating to look at, yet impossible to tear your eyes away from. Nachtwey's art is meant to force us to face unbearable facts. Faces are the key: you can't gaze into the eyes of a...


Life
Life Magazine
1931933847
Aug 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Nominated through on-line votes and selected by Life editors, the 100 images in this compendium cover unforgettable moments in "The Arts," "Society," "War & Peace" and "Science & Nature." The photographs are all striking-whether visually or viscerally, artistically or emotionally-but many are difficult to look at. As Gordon Parks writes in his introduction, "these images helped push us toward a change." And so it's possible to revisit the moments when a white crowd in Indiana cheered at the hanging bodies of two black men, when grieving members of AIDS activist David Kirby gathered around his deathbed, when the 1937 bombing of Shanghai left a train station destroyed and a single bloody child alone amidst the wreckage. There are a few lighter moments-the Beatles arriving at JFK in 1964, the American Olympic hockey...


Eyes of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina and Rita The Photographic Story
Dallas Morning News
1589793595
January 25, 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The top editors at the Dallas Morning News, accustomed to dire warnings about killer storms that never materialize, imagined a weakened Hurricane Katrina would make an anti-climactic landfall. But they positioned their teams of photographers and reporters before the storm hit, a decision that helped produce some of the most evocative images of the cataclysm that devastated the Gulf Coast. Those photographs, along with pictures from the succeeding September storm, Hurricane Rita, fill this chronicle of the events of late summer of 2005. But it is Katrina photos from New Orleans and its environs that dominate this volume. The opening shots document the monstrous traffic jams endured by those who fled Katrina's approach and the dismissive partying of some never-say-die denizens of the French Quarter before the...


World War I in Photographs
Adrian Gilbert
0760722706
October 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
From the Publisher World War 1 in photographs is a comprehensive visual record of this era, using extensive rare material to provide a unique examination of Word War 1. The books thorough visual coverage gives the reader an insight into the beginnings of modern warfare.


The Bikeriders
Danny Lyon
0811841618
Sept 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
In 1968, just before Easy Rider roared its way into American consciousness, Danny Lyon published The Bikeriders. A seminal work of modern photojournalism, this landmark collection of photographs and interviews documents the abandon and risk implied in the name of the gang Lyon belonged to: the Chicago Outlaw Motorcycle Club. With images and interviews that are as raw, alive, and dramatic today as they were three decades ago, this new edition includes startling new images: 15 additional black-and-white photographs and 14 color prints--long thought missing--of works originally published in black-and-white. With a new introduction by the author, The Bikeriders rides again, capturing like never before the dawn of the counterculture era.

About the Author
Danny Lyon is a writer and...


Shots in the Dark
Gail Buckland
0821227750
Oct 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This is a stark exploration, in archival photography and crisp commentary, of the full range of criminal darkness. Prepared by Buckland (who teaches at Cooper Union and is coauthor of The Magic Image: The Genius of Photography, etc.) with commentary by Evans (The American Century), the volume commemorates the 10th anniversary of Court TV along with a documentary series of the same name, which begins airing this month. The book is organized by subject matter ("Crime Scenes," "Killers," "Sensational Cases," "Retribution," "Gangsters," "Presidential Assassins"), while the authors' essays and captions provide deeper discussion of forensic photography's development and evolution in the American consciousness: the '40s noir landscapes of tabloid photographers like Weegee; shocking images from the public domain, like...


African Ceremonies
Carol Beckwith, Angela Fisher
0810942054
November 1, 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
By a recent count, the continent of Africa comprises some 1,300 cultures. Some of them number millions of people, some only a few families; some are thriving, while others are in danger of disappearing, the victims of acculturation or, in extreme cases, of genocide. This diversity--and the dangers to it--is little known outside Africa. Photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher highlight both matters in African Ceremonies, an extraordinary two-volume collection of some 850 full-color images. The two artists have traveled to almost all the continent's 53 countries in the last three decades, documenting traditional tribal life in earlier books and articles for National Geographic, among other publications. Here they focus on the religious customs of several dozen peoples, combining stunning images with well-written...


Flags of Our Fathers
James Bradley
055338029X
October 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth: in a month's time, more than 22,000 Japanese soldiers would die defending a patch of ground a third the size of Manhattan, while nearly 26,000 Americans fell taking it from them. The battle was a turning point in the war in the Pacific, and it produced one of World War II's enduring images: a photograph of six soldiers raising an American flag on the flank of Mount Suribachi, the island's commanding high point.

One of those young Americans was John Bradley, a Navy corpsman who a few days before had braved enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine and then drag him to safety. For this act of heroism Bradley would receive the Navy Cross, an award second only...



Through the Lens: National Geographic Greatest Photographs
Leah Bendavid-Val (Editor)
079226164X
October 2003
Hardcover
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Book Review
Since the 10.5 million images in National Geographic's possession won't fit in a book, the 250 in this moderately glossy, minimally costly collection will do nicely. Through the Lens is a stunning collection of photos judiciously apportioned to represent the regions of the earth, the sea, and outer space; humans and nature; and even the history of the medium--a few historic black and whites contrast dramatically with the eye-popping modern color shots that dominate the book. As ever, the esthetic key to their impact is the use of big, emotional pictures with witty little captions, and whenever possible, startling juxtapositions. A Boston matron's faux-fur coat looks just like her pet Dalmatian (the caption identifies them as "spots fans"). The world's widest street (in Buenos Aires) by night looks great next to a grassy...


Life: Heaven on Earth : 100 Places to See in Your Lifetime
Editors of Life Magazine
1933405058
April 4, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
From the Great Pyramid and the Sphinx to the mysteries of Easter Island and Stonehenge, the editors of Life draw on the world's finest photography to reveal why you must include these truly special 100 places in your life's itinerary. Drink in the kaleidoscope that is Australia's Great Barrier Reef and gaze at the majesty of Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro. Sample the sophisticated splendor of the Tuileries Gardens in Paris and the sun-baked wonders of the fortress city of the Andes, Machu Picchu. And, of course, the treasures of America are not forgotten, such as the awe-inspiring Grand Canyon and the serene Atlantic beauty of Nantucket Island.


Larry Burrows
Larry Burrows
037541102X
Oct 2002
Hardcover
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From Booklist
*Starred Review* Burrows was the only photographer allowed to take the doors off a fighter-bomber so he could lean out to snap some of his most extraordinary images of the Vietnam War. When other photojournalists objected because they were denied the same favor, the Vietnamese army told them, "Mr. Burrows's request was granted not because he is a photographer but because he is an artist." To page slowly and inevitably gravely through Burrows' Vietnam work is to agree wholeheartedly: he was an artist. In Vietnam from 1962 until he disappeared in February 1971 (surely killed when the helicopter he was in crashed, though definitive remains haven't been found), the Life staff photographer regarded the war as his greatest professional opportunity. His assignment to create photo-essays necessitated staying at the front...


Photojournalism: The Professionals' Approach
Kenneth Kobr
0240806107
March 2004
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Review
"If photojournalism if your passion, then you really should have a copy of this book on hand. .... This is a must have title if you wish to embark on a career in this exciting field."
--Shutterbug, March 2005

Review
'Every press photographer should own this book, newcomer or old hand. Apart from being a manual for the profession, it's a wonderful source of ideas. Highly recommended.' - Professional Photographer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Great Life Photographers
The Editors of Life
0821228927
Nov 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This book represents the work of every LIFE magazine staff photographer from the 20th century, as well as a handful of others closely affiliated with the magazine, including Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, Eugene Smith, and Joe McNally. THE GREAT LIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS presents the most iconic images of the past century, as well as little-known gems from the LIFE archives. Many of these images are markers of the major milestones of history--the first pictures from inside the womb or from outer space, Robert Capas falling soldier, and memorable scenes from Tiananmen Square. Defining celebrity portraits of Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, the Beatles, and Michael Jackson are also featured. This startingly rich collection of both color and black-and-white photographs is a vivid fulfillment of Henry...


Kilroy Was There
Tony Hillerman
0873388070
June 2004
Hardcover
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Flags of Our Fathers
James Bradley
0553111337
May 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth: in a month's time, more than 22,000 Japanese soldiers would die defending a patch of ground a third the size of Manhattan, while nearly 26,000 Americans fell taking it from them. The battle was a turning point in the war in the Pacific, and it produced one of World War II's enduring images: a photograph of six soldiers raising an American flag on the flank of Mount Suribachi, the island's commanding high point.

One of those young Americans was John Bradley, a Navy corpsman who a few days before had braved enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine and then drag him to safety. For this act of heroism Bradley would receive the Navy Cross, an award second only...



Forever Young
Douglas R. Gilbert
0306814811
Nov 2005
Hardcover
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The Boston Globe 10/6/2005
"Gilbert captures Dylan at a pivotal point in his career."

Relix 11/2005
"The photographs of Douglas Gilbert show a Dylan that no other pictures from the period capture."

See all Editorial Reviews


Flags of Our Fathers: Heroes of Iwo Jima
James Bradley
0385730640
May 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth: in a month's time, more than 22,000 Japanese soldiers would die defending a patch of ground a third the size of Manhattan, while nearly 26,000 Americans fell taking it from them. The battle was a turning point in the war in the Pacific, and it produced one of World War II's enduring images: a photograph of six soldiers raising an American flag on the flank of Mount Suribachi, the island's commanding high point.

One of those young Americans was John Bradley, a Navy corpsman who a few days before had braved enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine and then drag him to safety. For this act of heroism Bradley would receive the Navy Cross, an award second only...



Hungry Planet: What the World Eats
Faith D'Aluisio
1580086810
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
It's an inspired idea--to better understand the human diet, explore what culturally diverse families eat for a week. That's what photographer Peter Menzel and author-journalist Faith D'Alusio, authors of the equally ambitious Material World, do in Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, a comparative photo-chronicle of their visits to 30 families in 24 countries for 600 meals in all. Their personal-is-political portraits feature pictures of each family with a week's worth of food purchases; weekly food-intake lists with costs noted; typical family recipes; and illuminating essays, such as "Diabesity," on the growing threat of obesity and diabetes. Among the families, we meet the Mellanders, a German household of five who enjoy cinnamon rolls, chocolate croissants, and beef roulades, and whose weekly food...


Workers : An Archaeology of the Industrial Age
Sebastiao Salgado (Photographer)
089381525X
September 1, 1993
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Even as machines, robots and computers replace workers, Salgado's powerful, striking photographs reveal the backbreaking and unrelenting toil that is still the lot of millions of men and women around the globe. Never preachy or didactic, these 350 duotone images of tea pickers in Rwanda, dam builders in India, steelworkers in France and Ukraine, sugarcane harvesters in Brazil, assembly-line workers in Russia and China, sulfur miners in Indonesia and others, pay tribute to working people who preserve their dignity in the harshest conditions. In the lyrical accompanying essay, Salgado ( An Uncertain Grace ) laments Japan's industrial fishing which decimates fish stocks, France's agricultural policies and the global exploitation of manual laborers who do the bulk of the world's work. Copyright 1993 Reed Business...


Long's Peak
Dougald MacDonald
1565794974
June 2004
Paperback
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Junie B., First Grader: Aloha-Ha-Ha!
Barbara Park
0375834036
May 23, 2006
Hardcover
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Review
“Junie B. is sassy, hilarious, and insightful. . . . Park understands the passions and fears of first-graders.”—Booklist

“Despite Junie B.’s ascent to the rigors of first grade, Park’s feisty, funny heroine retains her trademark use of language, mirthful malapropisms, and essential larger-than-life personality.”—Kirkus Reviews

Book Description
It’s a week in “Pair-o-Dice!”

Junie B. and her family are going on a vacation to Hawaii! And ha! Mr. Scary is giving Junie a real, actual camera to keep a photo journal of her trip! But taking good vacation pictures is not always easy. ’Cause what if your airplane is full of grouchy ladies? And what if there is an unfortunate inner tube incident at...


The Best of Wedding Photojournalism
Bill Hurter
1584281227
Feb 2004
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Contains over 175 stunning sample images from over 35 top professional photographers."  —Petersen's Photographic


Revealing Character: Robb Kendrick's Texas Tintypes
Robb Kendrick
1931721572
September 30, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Using the cumbersome nineteenth century tintype method, National Geographic photographer Kendrick made a series of faux-antique portraits of some of the men (and one woman) who work as cowboys on Texas ranches today. Unlike Richard Avedon's similarly themed In the American West, this lavish book has no interest in the cultural contradictions inherent in the lives of those who deliberately try to evoke long-vanished and economically marginal ways of life-Kendrick is content to record the cowboys' images as lovingly as they would have themselves. In such an aesthetic, character is not revealed, but worn like chaps or an elaborately groomed mustache. The result is a book whose preening collective narcissism tips it over into the realm of camp. Perhaps sensing this, in his introduction Kendrick writes defensively,...

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