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American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer
Kai Bird
0375726268
April 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In American Prometheus, Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin delve deep into J. Robert Oppenheimer's life and deliver a thorough and devastatingly sad biography of the man whose very name has come to represent the culmination of 20th century physics and the irrevocable soiling of science by governments eager to exploit its products. Rich in historical detail and personal narratives, the book paints a picture of Oppenheimer as both a controlling force and victim of the mechanisms of power.

By the time the story reaches Oppenheimer's fateful Manhattan Project work, readers have been swept along much as the project's young physicists were by fate and enormous pressure. The authors allow the scientists to speak for themselves about their reactions to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, avoiding any sort of preacherly tone...



Kato Shidzue
Helen M. Hopper
0321078047
May 2003
Paperback
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Covering : The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights
Kenji Yoshino
0375508201
January 17, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Seldom has a work of such careful intellectual rigor and fairness been so deeply touching. Yoshino, a law professor at Yale and a gay, Asian-American man, masterfully melds autobiography and legal scholarship in this book, marking a move from more traditional pleas for civil equality to a case for individual autonomy in identity politics. In questioning the phenomenon of "covering," a term used for the coerced hiding of crucial aspects of one's self, Yoshino thrusts the reader into a battlefield of shifting gray areas. Yet, at every step, he anticipates the reader's questions and rebuttals, answering them not only with acute reasoning, but with disarming humility. What emerges is an eloquent, poetic protest against the hidden prejudices embedded in American civil rights...


Looking like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps
Mary Matsuda Gruenewald
0939165538
April 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
In 1941, Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was a teenage girl who, like other Americans, reacted with horror to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Yet soon she and her family were among 110,000 innocent people imprisoned by the U.S. government because of their Japanese ancestry. In this eloquent memoir, she describes both the day-to-day and the dramatic turning points of this profound injustice: what is was like to face an indefinite sentence in crowded, primitive camps; the struggle for survival and dignity; and the strength gained from learning what she was capable of and could do to sustain her family. It is at once a coming-of-age story with interest for young readers, an engaging narrative on a topic still not widely known, and a timely warning for the present era of terrorism. Complete with period photos, the book also brings...


The Similitude of Blossoms
Charles Shiro Inouye
0674808169
Nov 1998
Hardcover
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Book Description
Izumi Kyoka (1872-1939) wrote some 300 stories, plays, and essays. In the first book-length study in English of Kyoka, Charles Shiro Inouye argues that his writings were a refinement of a vision that came into focus around 1900. This narrative archetype formed the aesthetic and ethical bases of his work. Kyoka does not fit the conventional story of Japanese literary modernization. Unlike most of his contemporaries, he did not jettison the Japanese literary tradition in favor of modernist imports from the West. The highly visual mode of figuration that was Kyoka's compromise with the demands of literary modernism allows us to see the continuation of Edo culture in the Japanese modern and expand our understanding of literary reform in the early twentieth century.

About the Author
...


Flyboys: A True Story of Courage
James Bradley
0316105848
September 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The author of Flags of Our Fathers achieves considerable but not equal success in this new Pacific War-themed history. Again he approaches the conflict focused on a small group of men: nine American Navy and Marine aviators who were shot down off the Japanese-held island of Chichi Jima in February 1945. All of them were eventually executed by the Japanese; several of the guilty parties were tried and condemned as war criminals. When the book keeps its eye on the aviators-growing up under a variety of conditions before the war, entering service, serving as the U. S. Navy's spearhead aboard the fast carriers, or facing captivity and death-it is as compelling as its predecessor. However, a chapter on prewar aviation is an uncritical panegyric to WWI aerial bombing advocate Billy Mitchell, who was eventually...


Dear Miss Breed
Joanne Oppenheim
0439569923
February 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 6 Up–Through letters and recollections, Oppenheim relates the story of a group of young people who were interned during World War II. Breed had come to know many Japanese Americans through her work as the childrens librarian at the San Diego Public Library. When the young people were sent to camps in 1942, she began sending letters and care packages of books, candy, and other treats to her children. She also wrote articles for Library Journal and The Horn Book that articulated their plight. In return, the recipients expressed their gratitude in letters. While their lives were marked by deprivation and uncertainty, their letters reveal an unquenchable optimism. Their story, along with that of Miss Breed, is both remarkable and inspiring, and Oppenheim has done a fine job of assembling these...


Dictionary of Literary Biography
Steven D. Carter
0787630977
Mar 1999
Hardcover
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I Am Alive: A United States Marine's Story of Survival in a World War II Japanese POW Camp
Charles Jackson
0345449118
June 2003
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
[Editor's Note: The following is a combined review with DARBY'S RANGERS and VISIONS FROM A FOXHOLE.]--Things were so much easier when war was just good guys versus bad guys. Random House seems to have tapped into that sentiment with this trio of WWII memoirs. VISIONS FROM A FOXHOLE is the author's recounting of the battles he fought in Europe in the final few months of the war. An 18-year-old soldier in 1945, Foley later made a career as an artist, and he displays an obvious skill for observation. Jim Soreiro's reading is smooth but perhaps a bit too even--he narrates every passage with the same moderate urgency, whether his character is ducking bullets or making pencil sketches. The author of I AM ALIVE! saw little combat, having been captured in the Philippines in 1942 and spending the next three years as a prisoner in...


Flyboys: A True Story of Courage
James Bradley
0316159433
September 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
This acclaimed bestseller brilliantly illuminates a hidden piece of World War II history as it tells the harrowing true story of nine American airmen shot down in the Pacific. One of them, George H. W. Bush, was miraculously rescued. The fate of the others-an explosive 60-year-old secret-is revealed for the first time in FLYBOYS.


Farewell to Manzanar
James D. Houston, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
0618216200
April 29, 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Review
Library Journal : "A poignant memoir from a Japanese American. . . . Told without bitterness, her story reflects the triumph of the human spirit during an extraordinary episode in American history."
Publishers Weekly : "[Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston] describes vividly the life in the camp and the humiliations suffered by the detainees... A sober and moving personal account."

Review
"[Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston] describes vividly the life in the camp and the humiliations suffered by the detainees... A sober and moving personal account."

See all Editorial Reviews


Flyboys: A True Story of Courage
James Bradley
0641640749

Paperback
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To End All Wars
Ernest Gordon
0007118481
May 1, 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Now A Major Motion Picture Starring Robert Carlyle and Kiefer Sutherland

‘Waking from a dream, I suddenly realized where I was: in the Death House–in a prison camp by the River Kwai. I was a prisoner of war, lying among the dead, waiting for the bodies to be carried away so that I might have more room.’
When Ernest Gordon was twenty-four he was captured by the Japanese and forced, with other British prisoners, to build the notorious ‘Railroad of Death’, where nearly 16,000 Prisoners of War gave their life. Faced with the appalling conditions of the prisoners’ camp and the brutality of the captors, he survived to become an inspiring example of the triumph of the human spirit against all odds.

To End All Wars is Ernest Gordon’s gripping true story behind...


Flyboys : A True Story of Courage [BARGAIN PRICE]
James Bradley
B000ESSSGG
September 14, 2004
Paperback
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Geisha, A Life
Mineko Iwasaki
0743444299
September 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
Now in her 50s, Mineko Iwasaki was one of the most famed geishas of her generation (and the chief informant for Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha). Her ascent was difficult, not merely because of the hard, endless training she had to undergo--learning how to speak a hyper-elevated dialect of Japanese and how to sing and dance gracefully while wearing a 44-pound kimono atop six-inch wooden sandals--but also because many of the elaborate, self-effacing rules of the art went against her grain. A geisha "is an exquisite willow tree who bends to the service of others," she writes. "I have always been stubborn and contrary. And very, very proud." And playful, too: one of the funniest moments in this bittersweet book describes a disastrous encounter with the queen of England and her all-too-interested husband.

Revealing the...



American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer
Kai Bird
0375412026
April 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
In American Prometheus, Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin delve deep into J. Robert Oppenheimer's life and deliver a thorough and devastatingly sad biography of the man whose very name has come to represent the culmination of 20th century physics and the irrevocable soiling of science by governments eager to exploit its products. Rich in historical detail and personal narratives, the book paints a picture of Oppenheimer as both a controlling force and victim of the mechanisms of power.

By the time the story reaches Oppenheimer's fateful Manhattan Project work, readers have been swept along much as the project's young physicists were by fate and enormous pressure. The authors allow the scientists to speak for themselves about their reactions to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, avoiding any sort of preacherly tone...



With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa
E. B. Sledge
0195067142
October 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
In his own book, Wartime, Paul Fussell called With the Old Breed "one of the finest memoirs to emerge from any war." John Keegan referred to it in The Second World War as "one of the most arresting documents in war literature." And Studs Terkel was so fascinated with the story he
interviewed its author for his book, "The Good War." What has made E.B. Sledge's memoir of his experience fighting in the South Pacific during World War II so devastatingly powerful is its sheer honest simplicity and compassion.
Now including a new introduction by Paul Fussell, With the Old Breed presents a stirring, personal account of the vitality and bravery of the Marines in the battles at Peleliu and Okinawa. Born in Mobile, Alabama in 1923 and raised on riding, hunting, fishing, and a respect for history...


Nisei Memories: My Parents Talk About the War Years (The Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies)
Paul Howard Takemoto
0295985852
March 29, 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Nisei Memories is an extraordinarily moving account of two second-generation Japanese Americans who were demonized as threats to national security during World War II. Based on Paul Takemoto’s interviews with his parents, in which they finally divulge their past, Nisei Memories follows their lives before, during, and after the war -- his father serving his country, his mother imprisoned by it. At the start of the war, twenty-one-year-old Kaname (Ken) Takemoto was a sophomore at the University of Hawaii. Although classified as an "enemy alien," he served in the army, first as a Varsity Victory Volunteer and then as a combat medic with the 100th Battalion /442nd Regimental Combat Team in Italy. Fifteen-year-old Alice Setsuko Imamoto was attending high school in California when the war began. Soon after, her father...


The Jungle is Neutral: A Soldier's Two-Year Escape from the Japanese Army
F. Spencer Chapman
1592281079
August 1, 2003
Paperback
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Review
"The Jungle Is Neutral is a fascinating story . . . it is a thrilling chapter of a brave man's life."
--The New York Times


Evidence Not Seen: A Woman's Miraculous Faith in the Jungles of World War II
Darlene Deibler Rose
0060670207
September 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Description

This is the true story of a young American missionary woman courage and triump of faith in the jungles of New Guinea and her four years in a notorious Japanese prison camp. Never to see her husband again, she was forced to sign a confession to a crime she did not commit and face the executioner's sword, only to be miraculously spared.

From the Publisher
The true story of a young American missionary woman interned during World War II in a notorious Japanese prison camp.

See all Editorial Reviews



Farewell to Manzanar
Jeanne W. Houston
0553272586
January 1973
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Review
"[Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston] describes vividly the life in the camp and the humiliations suffered by the detainees... A sober and moving personal account." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
Jeanne Wakatsuki was seven years old in 1942 when her family was uprooted from their home and sent to live at Manzanar internment camp--with 10,000 other Japanese Americans. Along with searchlight towers and armed guards, Manzanar ludicrously featured cheerleaders, Boy Scouts, sock hops, baton twirling lessons and a dance band called the Jive Bombers who would play any popular song except the  nation's #1 hit: "Don't Fence Me In."



Farewell to Manzanar is the true story of one spirited Japanese-American family's attempt...

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