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Night
Elie Wiesel
0374500010
January 2006
Paperback
·
 
Amazon.com
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

The New York Times
"A slim volume of terrifying power"

See all Editorial Reviews


Big Book of Jewish Athletes
Peter Horvitz
1561719277
Nov 2005
Paperback
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Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk about Being Jewish
Abigail Pogrebin
0767916123
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Consistently engaging, these 60 interviews conducted by journalist Pogrebin explore the thoughts of well-known artists, politicians and others in the public eye on the complexities of Jewish identity;and the emotions they engender. The issues touched on range from the legacy of the Holocaust to the Middle East, Jewish traditions, intermarriage and much more. The conflicts are typified by Sarah Jessica Parker, who says her supportive feelings about Israel in its conflict with the Palestinians make her feel more Jewish, but she is uncertain about the religious education she will give her child. Others, like Dustin Hoffman and William Kristol, have been firmly committed to passing on Jewish rituals and history to their children. Gloria Steinem, who joyfully attends feminist seders, still remains alienated by the...


The Dictionary of Jewish Biography
Dan Cohn-Sherbok
0195223918
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This valuable new Judaica reference offers almost 4,000 brief biographies of people who have significantly contributed to Jewish life. Cohn-Sherbock, a rabbi and professor of Jewish theology at the University of Wales in Lampeter, spotlights biblical figures like the patriarch Abraham, modern figures like composer George Dreyfus and everything in between. On a single page, readers can learn about novelist E. L. Doctorow, Israeli soldier Ya'akov Dori, Babylonian philosopher and Talmudic commentator Dosa ben Saadyah, and first-century pseudo-messiah Dositheus. Those who made decidedly negative contributions to Jewish life have a place, too: there's the 13th-century Franciscan monk Nichols Donin, for example, who was responsible for burning countless copies of the Talmud. Maps and a short essay that traces Jewish...


I Have Lived A Thousand Years: Growing Up In The Holocaust
Livia Bitton-Jackson
0689823959
March 1999
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
PW's starred review called this memoir, of a 13-year-old Hungarian Jewish girl's incarceration in Auschwitz, "an exceptional story, exceptionally well told." Ages 12-up. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
Gr. 8^-12. In a graphic present-tense narrative, this Holocaust memoir describes what happens to a Jewish girl who is 13 when the Nazis invade Hungary in 1944. She tells of a year of roundups, transports, selections, camps, torture, forced labor, and shootings, then of liberation and the return of a few. For those who have read Leitner's stark The Big Lie (1992), this is a much more detailed account, with the same authority of a personal witness. Horrifying as her experience is, she doesn't dwell on the atrocities. There is hope here....


Flavius Josephus
Steve Mason
039104205X
Aug 2003
Paperback
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Man's Search For Meaning
Viktor E. Frankl
0671023373
December 1, 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl is among the most influential works of psychiatric literature since Freud. The book begins with a lengthy, austere, and deeply moving personal essay about Frankl's imprisonment in Auschwitz and other concentration camps for five years, and his struggle during this time to find reasons to live. The second part of the book, called "Logotherapy in a Nutshell," describes the psychotherapeutic method that Frankl pioneered as a result of his experiences in the concentration camps. Freud believed that sexual instincts and urges were the driving force of humanity's life; Frankl, by contrast, believes that man's deepest desire is to search for meaning and purpose. Frankl's logotherapy, therefore, is much more compatible with Western religions than Freudian psychotherapy. This is a...


James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity
Neil R. Davison
0521551811
May 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Review
'In this thorough and original study Davison poses fundamental questions: what did Joyce know or believe about the Jews, where did he derive his ideas, and to what use did he put them, especially in Ulysses? ... At every turn this superb study introduces fresh perspectives on an important subject.' James Joyce Literary Supplement
'Unlike previous books on the topic, Davison's book refuses simply to portray Joyce as a 'philo-Semite' who had an unproblematic identification with Jews as fellow marginals ... James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity does show convincingly how, along with Irish Catholocism, Ulysses was saturated with counter-reference to European anti-Semitism and the Jewish diaspora. Joyce's encyclopaedic reading of 'the Jews' has regained its rightful place in the texture and sinew of his...


Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
Edith Hahn Beer
068817776X
November 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Born to a middle-class, nonobservant Jewish family, Beer was a popular teenager and successful law student when the Nazis moved into Austria. In a well-written narrative that reads like a novel, she relates the escalating fear and humiliating indignities she and others endured, as well as the anti-Semitism of friends and neighbors. Using all their resources, her family bribed officials for exit visas for her two sisters, but Edith and her mother remained, due to lack of money and Edith's desire to be near her half-Jewish boyfriend, Pepi. Eventually, Edith was deported to work in a labor camp in Germany. Anxious about her mother, she obtained permission to return to Vienna, only to learn that her mother was gone. In despair, Edith tore off her yellow star and went underground. Pepi, himself a fugitive, distanced...


Night
Elie Wiesel, et al
0553272535


·
 
Book Review
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

Review
"To  the best of my knowledge no one has left behind him  so moving a record." -- Alfred...


James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity
Neil R. Davison
0521636205
Sept 1998
Paperback
·
 
Review
'In this thorough and original study Davison poses fundamental questions: what did Joyce know or believe about the Jews, where did he derive his ideas, and to what use did he put them, especially in Ulysses? ... At every turn this superb study introduces fresh perspectives on an important subject.' James Joyce Literary Supplement
'Unlike previous books on the topic, Davison's book refuses simply to portray Joyce as a 'philo-Semite' who had an unproblematic identification with Jews as fellow marginals ... James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity does show convincingly how, along with Irish Catholocism, Ulysses was saturated with counter-reference to European anti-Semitism and the Jewish diaspora. Joyce's encyclopaedic reading of 'the Jews' has regained its rightful place in the texture and sinew of his...


Nazi Hunter: The Wiesenthal File
Alan Levy
1567316875
June 2004
Hardcover
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In the Shadow of the Holocaust
Ludwig L. Geismar
0533150213
Apr 2005
Paperback
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Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
Anne Frank, et al
0553296981
June 1, 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
A beloved classic since its initial publication in 1947, this vivid, insightful journal is a fitting memorial to the gifted Jewish teenager who died at Bergen-Belsen, Germany, in 1945. Born in 1929, Anne Frank received a blank diary on her 13th birthday, just weeks before she and her family went into hiding in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Her marvelously detailed, engagingly personal entries chronicle 25 trying months of claustrophobic, quarrelsome intimacy with her parents, sister, a second family, and a middle-aged dentist who has little tolerance for Anne's vivacity. The diary's universal appeal stems from its riveting blend of the grubby particulars of life during wartime (scant, bad food; shabby, outgrown clothes that can't be replaced; constant fear of discovery) and candid discussion of emotions familiar to every...


A Picture Book of Anne Frank (Picture Book Biography Series)
David A. Adler
0823410781
April 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This most recent addition to the Picture Book Biography series balances candor with discretion in its presentation of heroine Anne Frank. Adler traces the intersection of Anne's brief life with the forces of Nazism, chronicling the girl's earliest years in Germany as well as her time spent in the now-famous Amsterdam attic and the months following arrest and deportation. He refuses to apply the standard encomiums about his subject's courage and genius, with the result that Anne Frank emerges all the more poignantly. Like Adler, Ritz conveys more than familiar icons: she has executed black-and-white drawings closely based on the well-known extant photographs of Anne and her family and friends, and set these into watercolors of, for example, 1930s Germany or Anne packing her diary. Even her picture of...


Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family, Vol. 1
Stephen J. Dubner
038072930X
October 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
"Choosing My Religion," Stephen Dubner's 1996 cover story for The New York Times Magazine, described his conversion from Catholicism to Judaism. The drama and complexity of Dubner's conversion were intensified by the author's unusual religious history: before Dubner was born, his parents had made an equal and opposite conversion from Judaism to Catholicism. Dubner's memoir, Turbulent Souls, expands the story he first told in the Times essay. In the book's prelude, Dubner explains that he began his wandering toward conversion in the 1980s when he moved to New York City, "the most Jewish city outside of Israel." There a certain disquietude began to take root inside me. I could not name this force, but neither could I make it leave me. And so I followed the noise inside my soul, and before long it led me back to my parents. I...


Maus : A Survivor's Tale : My Father Bleeds History/Here My Troubles Began/Boxed [BOX SET]
Art Spiegelman
0679748407
November 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.

Inside Flap Copy
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.


Three Generations of Jewish Women
Lea Ausch Alteras
0761823123
July 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Three Generations of Jewish Women examines the connections between three generations of Jewish women, beginning with the generation of female holocaust survivors.


The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness
Simon Wiesenthal
0805210601
January 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Author Simon Weisenthal recalls his demoralizing life in a concentration camp and his envy of the dead Germans who have sunflowers marking their graves. At the time he assumed his grave would be a mass one, unmarked and forgotten. Then, one day, a dying Nazi soldier asks Weisenthal for forgiveness for his crimes against the Jews. What would you do? This important book and the provocative question it poses is birthing debates, symposiums, and college courses. The Dalai Lama, Harry Wu, Primo Levi, and others who have witnessed genocide and human tyranny answer Wiesenthal's ultimate question on forgiveness. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
In this 1976 volume, divided into two sections, Wiesenthal tackles the question of the...


Survival In Auschwitz
Primo Levi
0684826801
September 1, 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Survival in Auschwitz is a mostly straightforward narrative, beginning with Primo Levi's deportation from Turin, Italy, to the concentration camp Auschwitz in Poland in 1943. Levi, then a 25-year-old chemist, spent 10 months in the camp. Even Levi's most graphic descriptions of the horrors he witnessed and endured there are marked by a restraint and wit that not only gives readers access to his experience, but confronts them with it in stark ethical and emotional terms: "[A]t dawn the barbed wire was full of children's washing hung out in the wind to dry. Nor did they forget the diapers, the toys, the cushions and the hundred other small things which mothers remember and which children always need. Would you not do the same? If you and your child were going to be killed tomorrow, would you not give him something to eat...


Dictionary of Literary Biography 28 Am-Jewish Wrtrs
Bruccoli
0810317060
May 1984
Hardcover
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Maimonides (Jewish Encounters)
Sherwin B. Nuland
0805242007
October 4, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Maimonides, one of the preeminent personalities of medieval Jewish history, was a jurist, philosopher, expert in Jewish law, physician at the court of Saladin and a respected and dedicated communal leader. Given all that, it's difficult to understand the decision to present Maimonides's legacy primarily through the lens of his work as a physician. The 12th century was a time of stagnation in the history of medicine, and the author himself concedes that Maimonides contributed very little that was new or innovative to the field. By contrast, his jurisprudential magnum opus, the Mishne Torah, constituted a groundbreaking work in its own day and continues to be authoritative almost a millennium later. Although Nuland acknowledges this in a chapter on Maimonides's religious scholarship, it is dwarfed by the...


Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account
Miklos Nyiszli
1559702028
September 1993
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Hungarian

Download Description
Auschwitz was one of the first books to bring the full horror of the Nazi death camps to the American public; this is, as the New York Review of Books said, "the best brief account of the Auschwitz experience available." --This text refers to the Digital edition.


Written Out of History
Sondra Henry
0930395107
May 1997
Paperback
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Judaica Book News
Anyone interested in knowing about the accomplishments of Jewish women must read (this) lovely book...

Feminist Collections Bulletin, University of Wisconsin Library System
Among the 'classics' of feminist writing about Jewish women

See all Editorial Reviews


A Transported Life
Thea Eden
0939821079
Apr 1995
Paperback
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Night
Elie Wiesel
0374399972
January 2006
Hardcover
·
 
Amazon.com
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

The New York Times
"A slim volume of terrifying power"

See all Editorial Reviews


Four Perfect Pebbles: A Holocaust Story
Lila Perl, Marion Blumenthal Lazan
0380731886
November 30, 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Amid a growing number of memoirs about the Holocaust, this book warrants attention both for the uncommon experiences it records and for the fullness of that record. Marion Blumenthal was not quite five years old in 1939 when her family fled Germany for Holland, ending up in the relative safety of Westerbork, then a refugee camp run by the Dutch government. They had visas for the U.S. and tickets for an ocean crossing, but during a fatal three-month postponement of their sailing, the Germans invaded Holland. By 1944 the Blumenthals arranged to be part of a group bound for Palestine in exchange for the release of German POWs; the family was instead sent to Bergen Belsen, where they remained, together, in the so-called Family Camp. Marion, her brother and parents survived the war, but her father died of typhus...


Eyewitness Auschwitz: Three Years in the Gas Chambers
Filip Muller, Filip Muller
1566632714
September 1, 1999
Paperback
·
 
Terrence Des Pres
A detailed description of life in Hell’s inmost circle...jammed with infernal information too terrible to be taken at once.

Jewish Press Features
Riveting...it is a tale of unprecedented, incomparable horror. Profoundly, intensely painful; but it is essential reading.

See all Editorial Reviews

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