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Eagle Blue : A Team, A Tribe, and a High School Basketball Team in Arctic Alaska
Michael D'Orso
1582346232
March 7, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Eight miles above the Arctic Circle, there's a village with no roads leading to it, but a high school basketball tradition that lights up winter's darkness and a team of native Alaskan boys who know "no quit." D'Orso (coauthor of Like No Other Time with Tom Daschle) follows the Fort Yukon Eagles through their 2005 season to the state championship, shifting between a mesmerizing narrative and the thoughts of the players, their coach and their fans. What emerges is more than a sports story; it's a striking portrait of a community consisting of a traditional culture bombarded with modernity, where alcoholism, domestic violence and school dropout rates run wild. One player compares Fort Yukon to a bucket of crabs: "If one crab gets a claw-hold on the edge... and starts to pull itself out, the...


The Last of the Mohicans (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593083351
November 2004
Hardcover
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The Journey of Crazy Horse
Joseph M. Marshall, III
0670033553
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In one of the first Penguin Lives biographies (1999's Crazy Horse), novelist Larry McMurtry drew on what scant facts he had to craft a brief and rather novelistic look at the legendary Lakota warrior. Here, Lakota author Marshall (The Lakota Way; Winter of the Holy Iron) draws on a rich Native American oral tradition to carefully and lovingly "unfold the life of Crazy Horse as a storyteller would." The result is a vivid, haunting biography that acknowledges the author's boyhood hero worship but avoids hagiography. Raised on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, Marshall recalls hearing his grandfather share stories of battles fought 75 years earlier against "Long Hair," the Lakota name for Gen. George Custer, vanquished at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Marshall reveals Crazy Horse as loyal son, spurned lover,...


The Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living: Native American Wisdom on Ethics and Character
Joseph M. Marshall
0142196096
October 2002
Paperback
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About the Author
Joseph M. Marshall III was born on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in what is now south-central South Dakota. A historian, educator, speaker, and the author of two collections of essays and a novel, Marshall has also been an advisor and actor in television movies, and a recipient of the Wyoming Humanities Award.


Neither Wolf Nor Dog
Kent Nerburn
1577312333
Sept 2002
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Non-Indian theologian and editor Nerburn attempts to "bridge the gap between the world into which I had been born and the world of a people I had grown to know and love" by narrating the fascinating toils and truths of Dan, a 78-year-old Lakota man.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist
Readers looking for another red-man-departs-wise-words-to-white-man-to-lessen-white- man's-guilt will be disappointed by the tone and content of this work. Realists wanting a truthful, fiery, and, ultimately, cleansing dialogue between Indian and white will definitely want it. Nerburn reluctantly agrees to a meeting with Dan, a Lakota elder who asks him to construct a book from a motley...


The Last of the Mohicans (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593080654
November 2003
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
The second and most popular chronicle in his Leather-stocking Tales, James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans is one of the great historical romances to come out of America. Set in 1757 amidst the French and Indian War, the novel tells the story of frontier scout Hawkeye and his efforts to conduct two daughters of a fort commander to safety.

Stephen Railton is Professor of English at the University of Virginia. Railton has published Fenimore Cooper: A Study of His Life and Imagination.


Lakota Woman Tie in
Mary Crow Dog
0060973897
May 1991
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Mary Brave Bird gave birth to a son during the 71-day siege of Wounded Knee in 1973, which ended with a bloody assault by U.S. marshalls and police. Seventeen years old at the time, she married fellow activist Leonard Crow Dog, medicine man and spiritual leader of the American Indian Movement (AIM). Written with Erdoes ( Lame Deer ; Seeker of Visions ), her searing autobiography is courageous, impassioned, poetic and inspirational. Her girlhood, a vicious circle of drinking and fighting, was marked by poverty, racism and a rape at 14. She ran away from a coldly impersonal boarding school run by nuns where, she reports, Indian students were beaten to induce them to give up native customs and speech. The authors write of AIM's infiltration by FBI agents, of Mary Crow Dog helping her husband endure prison, of Indian...


Sacred Hoops : Spiritual Lessons of a Hardwood Warrior
Phil Jackson
078688200X
November 7, 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
An inside look at the higher wisdom of teamwork from Chicago Bulls' head coach Phil Jackson. At the heart of the book is Jackson's philosophy of mindful basketball -- and his lifelong quest to bring enlightenment to the competitive world of professional sports, beginning with a focus on selfless team play rather than "winning through intimidation". Sacred Hoops is not just for sports fans, but for anyone interested in the potential of the human spirit. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
Considered a maverick for his unorthodox coaching methods, Jackson demonstrates how he adapts the precepts of Zen Buddhism, the ways of the Lakota Sioux, and other alternative styles to the task of coaching the National Basketball...


I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala
Rigoberta Menchu
0860917886
August 1987
Textbook Paperback
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From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
"This is my testimony. I didn't learn it from a book and I didn't learn it alone... My personal experience is the reality of a whole people." Born in the mountains of Guatemala into the Quiche, one of twenty-three mestizo groups, Rigoberta Menchu tells her story. The Quiche people's spirituality, much of which must not be told to outsiders, affirms community responsibility for village children and intensely personal relationships with the land and the natural world. The celebration of her ancient culture is all that strengthens in the face of a brutally repressed and poverty-stricken existence. Two of her brothers die as infants from malnutrition. When the Quiche begin their fight to keep the government and big-business people from stealing any more of their land, her family is...


The Active Side of Infinity
Carlos Castaneda
006092960X
January 1, 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Although he died last April, Castaneda, dubbed "the Godfather of the New Age" by some, speaks, as seems only fitting for a man who called himself a sorcerer, from beyond the beyond. Castaneda undertook this somewhat autobiographical record of memories and experiences during his famous apprenticeship to don Juan, the Yaqui Indian who tutored him in the ways of shamanism. According to Castaneda, don Juan asked him to remember the most significant events of his life and to describe them in great detail as a means to recoup psychic energy and to understand the forces of "infinity" that had led him to the path of the "warrior-traveler." Castaneda uses those personal events to illustrate aspects of Yaqui mysticism, restating the fundamental themes of his work in a more accessible manner than some of his other writings....


Mankiller
Wilma Pearl Mankiller
0312206623
Feb 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Since 1985 Wilma Mankiller has been Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, the first woman to hold this post in a major tribe. Her work in rural development, especially the Bell Project in Oklahoma, has received national acclaim. With Wallis ( Route 66 ), Mankiller recounts the tragic history of the Cherokees and her own personal struggles. In the 1950s, her family moved from rural Oklahoma to San Francisco in a government relocation project. It was a traumatic change for the 11-year-old and her 10 brothers and sisters and brought her face-to-face with racism and poverty. The 1969 Indian occupation of Alcatraz, which she supported strongly and participated in to a slight degree, proved a turning point in Mankiller's life. She became an activist in Indian affairs, eventually leaving her husband and returning with...


Shadows on the Koyukuk: An Alaskan Native's Life Along the River
Sidney Huntington, Jim Rearden
088240427X
April 1993
Paperback
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Book Description
In his dramatic autobiography, Alaskan elder Sidney Huntington, half-white, half-Athabascan, recounts his adventures, tragedies, and ultimate success.


Grandfather: A Native American's Lifelong Search for Truth and Harmony with Nature
Tom Brown
042518174X
November 2001
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
YA-Another in the list of Brown's wilderness/mysticism/ethos/survival books. This one takes readers through some of the most profound experiences of the old Apache of the title, who imparted to his grandson the wisdom expressed in the author's earlier titles. Going much deeper than nostalgia for a lost way of life, this work exhorts readers to eschew materialism and waste, and return to a simpler but more satisfying relationship with the fragile Earth. Grandfather is filled with visions and mystical phenomena as it relates the old man's search for the universal and sublime truths that will enable humankind to find harmony with nature.Judy McAloon, Potomac Branch, Prince Edward Public Library System, VACopyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition....


Chief Joseph
Candy Vyvey Moulton
0765310635
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Moulton has written extensively on western expansion. Here, she focuses on Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce tribe, who, after trying for years to accommodate encroaching white men on his tribal lands, gave up and attempted, in the fall of 1877, to lead his people to safety in Canada. Born in 1840, Joseph was present at the signing of the 1855 treaty, which allowed the tribe to hold on to a 5,000-square-mile region in Idaho and Oregon, including their beloved Wallowa Valley. By 1877, a year after the Battle of Little Bighorn, word came from Washington that they had to move to a small reservation instead. Joseph, now chief, decides to take his people through Yellowstone and Montana, hoping to join Sitting Bull and his followers 300 miles north in Saskatchewan. They are caught by U.S. army troops just 40 miles short of their...


Genocide of the Mind (Native American Studies Series): New Native American Writing
Marijo Moore (Editor)
1560255110
November 2003
Paperback
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From Booklist
Addressing the genocide of Native American cultural identity over the past 100 years, this collection of 35 essays by authors representing more than 25 tribal nations is at once eye-opening, brutally frank, and ultimately optimistic. Established writers such as Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Maurice Kenny, along with a host of emerging writers, teachers, poets, students, and visual artists, have come together, brilliantly elucidating the overlapping causes of the disappearance of tribal identity. These include the move by 60 percent of Native Americans to urban areas, the dissipation of Native languages, gradual assimilation into the non-Native society and the resulting mixed parentage of many young Native Americans, and media stereotyping and its concomitant racism. Every reader will feel a call to action...


Pocahontas
Paula Gunn Allen
0060730609
Oct 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In what is presented as the first study of its kind by an American Indian scholar, Allen (The Sacred Hoop) offers a corrective to the romantic story of Pocahontas told initially by Capt. John Smith of the Virginia Company and most recently by Disney Studios. Euro-American historical accounts of Pocahontas's brief life, asserts Allen, typically depict her as a lovelorn and tragic character (she died in 1617 in the aptly named river port of Gravesend, England, at the age of 20 or 21). Allen's Pocahontas, by contrast, is a real visionary, a prodigiously gifted young woman fervently devoted to the spiritual traditions of her people: a loose-knit group of Algonquin tribes known as the Powhatan Alliance, or Tsenacommacah. When the English colonists who began establishing Jamestown in 1607 invaded the Tsenacommacah,...


The Wind Is My Mother: The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman
Bear Heart
0425161609
February 1, 1998
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Bear Heart, a full-blooded Muskogee Creek Indian and one of the last "trained" Medicine Men, shares this knowledge, combining it with his more formal, graduate degree in psychology to build a bridge between Native American and modern spirituality. Categorized as an autobiography, the book is nevertheless constructed episodically rather than chronologically, resulting in a lack of fluidity that may distract some readers. The first section describes Bear Heart's family, their beliefs and the calling and training he received to be a medicine man. In the second section, great truths of Native American beliefs and Christianity find parallels. Section three further describes the relationship of human beings to each other, to nature and to the Great Being; the importance of the Sacred Pipe; and the purposes of vision...


Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors
Stephen E. Ambrose
0385479662
May 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Military historian Ambrose examines the connections between the Indian chief and the cavalry officer who fought at Little Bighorn. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review
"Movingly told and well written . . . a fine  contribution, one that will be read with pleasure and  admiration by general reader, student and scholar  alike. Ambrose has breathed new life into the  familiar facts."--Library  Journal

"An epic and accurate retelling  of one of our country's most tragic  periods."--Baltimore Sun

See all Editorial Reviews


The Frontiersmen (The Winning of America Series), Vol. 1
Allan W. Eckert
0945084919
March 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River, victims of Indians who claimed the vast virgin territory and strove to turn back the growing tide of whites. These frontiersmen are the subjects of Allan Eckert's dramatic history. Against the background of such names as George Rogers Clark, Daniel Boone, Arthur St. Clair, Anthony Wayne, Simon Girty and William Henry Harrison, Eckert has recreated the life of one of...


The Blood Runs Like a River Through My Dreams
Nasdijj
0618154485
Sept 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The language and form of this searing book are as powerful as the life experience that inspired them. In a series of essays that cohere into a spiritual autobiography, the author writes prose that's deceptively simple yet rich in metaphor. An wild horse living in the parking lot of a Navajo school becomes a symbol for living creatures' intrinsic wildness, tamed only at a terrible cost. "We are all runaway horses" is one constant refrain, as is the reminder "you are your history." The author's history is painful: born in 1950 the son of an alcoholic Native American woman and a white cowboy father who "would sell my mom to other migrant men for five dollars," Nasdijj grew up a "mongrel" and an outcast, contending with his violent father's demons while his mother beguiled them with Indian stories. Living on a reservation, never...


Journey of Crazy Horse: A Lakota History
Joseph M. Marshall
0143036211
September 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In one of the first Penguin Lives biographies (1999's Crazy Horse), novelist Larry McMurtry drew on what scant facts he had to craft a brief and rather novelistic look at the legendary Lakota warrior. Here, Lakota author Marshall (The Lakota Way; Winter of the Holy Iron) draws on a rich Native American oral tradition to carefully and lovingly "unfold the life of Crazy Horse as a storyteller would." The result is a vivid, haunting biography that acknowledges the author's boyhood hero worship but avoids hagiography. Raised on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, Marshall recalls hearing his grandfather share stories of battles fought 75 years earlier against "Long Hair," the Lakota name for Gen. George Custer, vanquished at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Marshall reveals Crazy Horse as loyal son, spurned lover,...


Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough
Helen C. Rountree
0813923239
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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Karen O. Kupperman, author of Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America
"Makes good on the promise to tell the story of early seventeenth-century Virginia from the Native Americans' point of view."

Book Description
Pocahontas may be the most famous Native American who ever lived, but during the settlement of Jamestown, and for two centuries afterward, the great chiefs Powhatan and Opechancanough were the subjects of considerably more interest and historical documentation than the young woman. It was Opechancanough who captured the foreign captain "Chawnzmit" -- John Smith. Smith gave Opechancanough a compass, described to him a spherical earth that revolved around the sun, and wondered if his captor was a cannibal. Opechancanough, who was no cannibal and knew the world was flat,...


Prison Writings : My Life Is My Sun Dance
Leonard Peltier, et al
0312263805
June 16, 2000
Paperback
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From Booklist
American Indian Movement (AIM) activist Peltier, arrested more than two decades ago on charges stemming from conflict with the FBI on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, has become a symbol of the oppression of Indians and other indigenous people. Indeed, he is perhaps the most famous inmate in the U.S., regarded by many as a political prisoner, with Robert Redford, author Peter Mathiesson, former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark, and others calling for his release. He remains incarcerated, often in horrific conditions. As if engaged in the sun dance, in which apparently unendurable sufferings are embraced as a spiritual testimony, Peltier writes of his life, before and behind bars, with anger but not rancor. Since his youth as a warrior, he has become a spiritual elder whose words offer much to Indians and...


The Deerslayer (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593082118
July 2005
Paperback
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Ishi's Brain
Orin Starn
0393326985
June 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Touted in his day as "the last wild Indian," Ishi, of the Northern Californian Yahi people, survived by adapting to a life housed within a San Francisco anthropological museum, where spectators paid to see him make arrowheads, until he died in 1916. Under 1990s repatriation laws, a group of Maidu Indians from the Sierra Nevada region sought to reclaim Ishi's ashes, buried in a San Francisco cemetery, but a rumor persisted that Ishi's brain had been removed during autopsy, pickled, and was still hidden somewhere. Duke University anthropologist Starn searched for the brain and here offers an unlikely narrative, informative and politicized, with easy-to-read, much-needed thumbnail histories of the Indian Wars. (As Starn notes, California Gold Rush atrocities against Native Americans are so recent that people...

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