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All Creatures Great and Small
James Herriot
0312965788
April 1998
Mass Market Paperback
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Review
"One of the funniest and most likeable books around."-- Atlantic Monthly

"If there is any justice, All Creatures Great And Small will become a classic of its kind...With seemingly effortless art, this man tells his stories with perfect timing and optimum scale. Many more famous authors could work for a lifetime and not achieve more flawless literary control."-- Chicago Tribune Book World

"Herriot charms because he delights in life, embraces it with sensitivity and gust and writes with grace. All Creatures Great And Small may well be the happiest book of the year."-- The New York Times Book Review


The Pact
Sampson Davis
157322989X
May 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
As teenagers from a rough part of Newark, New Jersey, Sampson Davis, Rameck Hunt, and George Jenkins had nothing special going for them except loving mothers (one of whom was a drug user) and above-average intelligence. Their first stroke of luck was testing into University High, one of Newark's three magnet high schools, and their second was finding each other. They were busy staying out of trouble (most of the time), and discovering the usual ways to skip class and do as little schoolwork as possible, when a recruitment presentation on Seton Hall University reignited George's childhood dream of becoming a dentist. The college was offering a tempting assistance package for minorities in its Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Plus Program. George convinced his two friends to go to college with him. They would help each other through....


Bedside Manners: One Doctor's Reflections on the Oddly Intimate Encounters between Patient and Healer
David Watts
1400080525
February 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"Sickness brings out the worst in people.... Many of my patients exhibit neurotic behavior.... But generally, their basic attitude is that of prayer—an almost desperate pleading for mercy at the hands of illness." These words by Watts, a poet and commentator on NPR as well as a practicing physician, exemplify his nuanced and thoughtful attitude toward his patients. Both empathetic and practical, Watts relates encounters that have informed his ability to understand, diagnose and treat sickness. In "The Morbius Monster," a youngish man suffering from severe indigestion asks to be heavily sedated during an endoscopy, but even while unconscious resists the procedure. Through intuition and sensitive questioning, Watts elicits an account of early child abuse, and with the patient's cooperation, talks him through...


Notes on Nursing (The Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading Series)
Florence Nightingale
0760749949
June 2004
Paperback
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Mountains Beyond Mountains
Tracy Kidder
0812973011
Jan 2004
Paperback
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Review
“In this excellent work, Pulitzer Prize—winner Kidder immerses himself in and beautifully explores the rich drama that exists in the life of Dr. Paul Farmer…Throughout, Kidder captures the almost saintly effect Farmer has on those whom he treats.”
-Publisher’s Weekly, starred review

“[A] Skilled and graceful exploration of the soul of an astonishing human being.”
-Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“A fine writer and his extraordinary subject: Tracy Kidder, in giving us Paul Farmer, lifts up an image of hope–and challenge–that the world urgently needs. Simply put, this is an important book.” -James Carroll, author of Constantine's Sword

“The central character of this...


Autobiography of a Face
Lucy Grealy
0060569662
March 18, 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
At age nine, Lucy Grealy was diagnosed with a potentially terminal cancer. When she returned to school with a third of her jaw removed, she faced the cruel taunts of classmates. In this strikingly candid memoir, Grealy tells her story of great suffering and remarkable strength without sentimentality and with considerable wit. Vividly portraying the pain of peer rejection and the guilty pleasure of wanting to be special, Grealy captures with unique insight what it is like as a child and young adult to be torn between two warring impulses: to feel that more than anything else we want to be loved for who we are, while wishing desperately and secretly to be perfect --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Diagnosed at age nine with Ewing's...


Kitchen Table Wisdom: Stories That Heal
Rachel Naomi Remen
1573226106
August 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
"Sitting around the table telling stories is not just a way of passing time," writes Rachel Naomi Remen in her introduction to Kitchen Table Wisdom. "It is the way wisdom gets passed along. The stuff that helps us live a life worth remembering." Remen, a physician, therapist, professor of medicine, and long-term survivor of chronic illness, is also a down-home storyteller. Reading this collection of real-life parables feels like a late-night kitchen session with a best friend, munching on leftovers while listening to the good-as-gossip stories of everyday heroes and archetype villains. Every story guides us like a life compass, showing us what's good and lasting about ourselves as well as humanity. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From...


Gifted Hands
M.D. Ben Carson
0310214696
December 1996
Mass Market Paperback
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From School Library Journal
YA-- A brief, easy-to-read autobiography of a black man who is one of today's leading neurosurgeons. While pursuing his career, Carson encountered prejudice, negative peer pressure, and politics in getting a job. His sense of humor, faith in God, patience, and his belief in the work ethic come through without preaching. In the last chapter, Carson gives recommendations to students on ways to live and to achieve. --Claudia Moore, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VACopyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
Ben Carson, M.D., works medical miracles. Today, he's one of the most celebrated neurosurgeons in the world. In Gifted Hands, he tells of his inspiring odyssey from his childhood in...


Tales from the Bed
Jenifer Estess
0743476832
Nov 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
By the time 40-year-old Jenifer Estess died of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) last December, she and her sisters had founded an organization-Project A.L.S.-to find a cure for this fatal neuromuscular disease. This fast-paced, witty book, written with one of her sisters, is both a memoir of Jenifer's six-year struggle with the disease and a chronicle of Project A.L.S.'s birth and work. Unfortunately, the beauty of the writing and the story is compromised by a too-casual structure; even simple chapter titles could have remedied the book's scattered feeling. This haze appears elsewhere, too: for instance, after deciding to found Project A.L.S, the sisters recruited theater colleagues, including Ben Stiller, to help, but they don't explain how Jenifer had made those contacts in the first place (the necessary details of...


Death Be Not Proud: A Memoir
John Gunther
0060929898
January 1998
Paperback
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-- The New Yorker
"A heartbreaking tale, beautifully written."

Book Description
Johnny Gunther was only seventeen years old when he died of a brain tumor. During the months of his illness, everyone near him was unforgettably impressed by his level-headed courage, his wit and quiet friendliness, and, above all, his unfaltering patience through times of despair. This deeply moving book is a father's memoir of a brave, intelligent, and spirited boy.

See all Editorial Reviews


Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America
Elizabeth Wurtzel
1573229628
April 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Elizabeth Wurtzel writes with her finger in the faint pulse of a generation whose ruling icons are Kurt Cobain, Xanax, and pierced tongues. A memoir of her bouts with depression and skirmishes with drugs, Prozac Nation still manages to be a witty and sharp account of the psychopharmacology of an era.

From Publishers Weekly
Twenty-six-year-old Wurtzel, a former critic of popular music for New York and the New Yorker, recounts in this luridly intimate memoir the 10 years of chronic, debilitating depression that preceded her treatment with Prozac in 1990. After her parents' acrimonious divorce, Wurtzel was raised by her mother on Manhattan's Upper West Side. The onset of puberty, she recalls, also marked the onset of recurrent bouts of acute depression, sending her spiraling into...


Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science
Atul Gawande
0312421702
April 1, 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
Gently dismantling the myth of medical infallibility, Dr. Atul Gawande's Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is essential reading for anyone involved in medicine--on either end of the stethoscope. Medical professionals make mistakes, learn on the job, and improvise much of their technique and self-confidence. Gawande's tales are humane and passionate reminders that doctors are people, too. His prose is thoughtful and deeply engaging, shifting from sometimes painful stories of suffering patients (including his own child) to intriguing suggestions for improving medicine with the same care he expresses in the surgical theater. Some of his ideas will make health care providers nervous or even angry, but his disarming style, confessional tone, and thoughtful arguments should win over most readers....


Maimonides (Jewish Encounters)
Sherwin B. Nuland
0805242007
October 4, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Maimonides, one of the preeminent personalities of medieval Jewish history, was a jurist, philosopher, expert in Jewish law, physician at the court of Saladin and a respected and dedicated communal leader. Given all that, it's difficult to understand the decision to present Maimonides's legacy primarily through the lens of his work as a physician. The 12th century was a time of stagnation in the history of medicine, and the author himself concedes that Maimonides contributed very little that was new or innovative to the field. By contrast, his jurisprudential magnum opus, the Mishne Torah, constituted a groundbreaking work in its own day and continues to be authoritative almost a millennium later. Although Nuland acknowledges this in a chapter on Maimonides's religious scholarship, it is dwarfed by the...


Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey through Schizophrenia
Pamela Spiro Wagner
0312320647
August 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. This harrowing but arresting memoir—written in alternating voices by identical twins, now in their 50s—reveals how devastating schizophrenia is to both the victim and those who love her. The condition, which afflicts Pamela (an award-winning poet), can be controlled with drugs and psychiatry, but never cured. When the twins were young, Pamela always outshone Carolyn. But in junior high, Pamela was beset by fears and began a lifelong pattern of cutting and burning herself. After the two entered Brown University, Pamela's decline into paranoia accelerated until she attempted suicide. During the ensuing years of Pamela's frequent breakdowns and hospitalizations, Carolyn became a psychiatrist, married and had two children. Empathetic and concerned, Carolyn nonetheless conveys her...


Every Living Thing
James Herriot
0312950586
Aug 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Herriot's many fans will not be disappointed by his latest, which picks up the story of his veterinary practice in Yorkshire after WW II. BOMC main selection and 22-week PW bestseller in cloth. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
YA-- A master storyteller continues the charming account of his experiences as veterinarian in rural Yorkshire. And although there are more cats and dogs as patients than before, there are plenty of large farm animals to deal with, frequently during the middle of the night. The detailed but succinct descriptions of people, places, and animals are a delight. Herriot's unusual ability to identify individual characters, both human and four-legged, brings them to life--even for the most urban American. The...


Not Fade Away
Laurence Shames
006073731X
Sept 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"I'm hardly the first person to notice that there is only the present, constantly," writes Barton in this extraordinary memoir. "The present moment is lived, and relieved; written, and rewritten. Every previous version still inhabits it." What gives this insight and the many others that follow uncommon power is the ever present fact that Barton, a pioneering entrepreneur in the cable television industry, was dying of stomach cancer as he wrote them. Alternating chapters with mystery writer Shames (The Naked Detective), Barton, who died in September, 2002, at 51, offers us-and his wife and three children-his final rewrite of a life filled with the optimism and idealism of his generation. Barton tells us how it feels to die while the party is still raging, offering us glimpses of a life that packed in everything...


In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind
Eric R. Kandel
0393058638
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
When, as a medical student in the 1950s, Kandel said he wanted to locate the ego and id in the brain, his mentor told him he was overreaching, that the brain had to be studied "cell by cell." After his initial dismay, Kandel took on the challenge and in 2000 was awarded a Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking research showing how memory is encoded in the brain's neuronal circuits. Kandel's journey into the brain spans five decades, beginning in the era of early research into the role of electrical currents flowing through neurons and ending in the age of genetic engineering. It took him from early studies of reflexes in the lowly squid to the founding of a bioengineering firm whose work could some day develop treatments for Alzheimer's and on to a rudimentary understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying...


The Devil's Doctor : Paracelsus and the World of Renaissance Magic and Science
Philip Ball
0374229791
April 18, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. If one really wants to understand the contradictions and "intellectual ferment" of the 16th century, says Ball, one should look not at Luther or Copernicus, but at the much-maligned Paracelsus. Born in Switzerland in 1493, Philip Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, aka Paracelsus, is a figure often more imagined than known. Famous as a doctor of alchemic medicine, he has been compared with Faust and developed a reputation as a miracle worker and charlatan that only grew after his death in 1543. Ball, author of the prize-winning Critical Mass, mixes scant biographical detail with a wide-ranging evocation of the Renaissance worldview to create a fascinating portrait of the man, his age and his historical reputation. Forays into ancient, medieval and Islamic medicine, academic rivalries, the...


Bryson City Tales
Walt Larimore
0310256704
July 2004
Paperback
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Christian Retailing, April 15, 2002
"Reminiscent of authors like Philip Gulley, Larimore keeps readers laughing through one chapter and teary-eyed through the next." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
Captivating stories of how a young doctor’s first year of medical practice in the Smoky Mountains shaped his practice of life and faith

The little mountain hamlet of Bryson City, North Carolina, offers more than dazzling vistas. For Walt Larimore, a young “flatlander” physician setting up his first practice, the town presents its peculiar challenges as well.

With the winsomeness of a James Herriott book, Bryson City Tales sweeps you into a world of colorful characters, the texture of Smoky Mountain life,...


All Things Wise and Wonderful
James Herriot
0312966555
July 1998
Mass Market Paperback
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From AudioFile
Christopher Timothy played James Herriot in the beloved BBC series "All Creatures Great and Small." Here Timothy reprises his role as the young country vet in this third collection of Herriot stories. While training to be a Royal Air Force pilot in the midst of WWII, Herriot muses on his life in the Yorkshire dales. Sit back with a cup of tea as Timothy tells you funny, gentle, and occasionally sad tales about characters such as local farmers with broad accents; the posh Mrs. Pomphrey, whose overfed Pomeranian passes gas; and the Ministry of Agriculture officials, who rake James over the coals for inept form-filling. Timothy develops countless individual voices with different class accents, and all are perfect. An absolute joy. A.B. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine--...


Mountains Beyond Mountains: Healing the World: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer
Tracy Kidder
0375506160
September 9, 2003
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Thought-provoking and profoundly satisfying, this book will inspire feelings of humility, admiration, and disquietude; in some readers, it may sow the seeds of humanitarian activism. As a specialist in infectious diseases, Farmer's goal is nothing less than redressing the "steep gradient of inequality" in medical service to the desperately poor. His work establishing a complex of public health facilities on the central plateau of Haiti forms the keystone to efforts that now encompass initiatives on three continents. Farmer and a trio of friends began in the 1980s by creating a charitable foundation called Partners in Health (PIH, or Zanmi Lasante in Creole), armed with passionate conviction and $1 million in seed money from a Boston philanthropist. Kidder provides anecdotal evidence that...


Not Entirely Benign Procedure: Four Years as a Medical Student
Perri Klass
0452272580
January 1987
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
As a Harvard medical student in 1982, Klass became a contributor to the New York Times "Hers" column; this is a collection of the author's diary-like essays describing her medical training, her life as a lover, a woman and a mother. The accounts are informed by the artistry Klass displays in her fiction, Recombinations and I Am Having an Adventure. Writing personally and candidly, she brings the reader into her orbit, into the experiences of a thoughtful person, in situations that are comic, difficult, puzzling and often tragic. There are moving instances of a doctor's mandated objectivity while involved with the dying and with the bereaved. In lighter moments, Klass twits pompous members of the healing profession and offers insights on the status of women doctors; they are frequently mistaken for nursesmen never...


The End of Time
David Horowitz
1594030804
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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Walter Issacson, author of Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
"This is a poignant and powerful rumination on the meaning of life and the meaning of death."

Stanley Fish, author of How Milton Works
"Beautifully written, unflinching in its contemplation of the abyss, and yet finally hopeful in its acceptance of human finitude."

See all Editorial Reviews

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