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Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism
Temple Grandin
0307275655
January 2006
Paperback
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Review
“I hardly know what to say about this remarkable book. . . It provides a way to understand the many kinds of sentience, human and animal, that adorn the earth.” –Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of The Hidden Life of Dogs

"There are innumerable astounding facets to this remarkable book. . . . Displaying uncanny powers of observation . . . [Temple Grandin] charts the differences between her life and the lives of those who think in words." –The Philadelphia Inquirer

“A uniquely fascinating view not just of autism but of animal–and human–thinking and feeling, [providing] insights that can only be called wisdom.”
–Deborah Tannen, author of You Just Don’t Understand

Book Description
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Darkness Visible
William Styron
0679736395
Jan 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
In 1985 William Styron fell victim to a crippling and almost suicidal depression, the same illness that took the lives of Randall Jarrell, Primo Levi and Virginia Woolf. That Styron survived his descent into madness is something of a miracle. That he manages to convey its tortuous progression and his eventual recovery with such candor and precision makes Darkness Visible a rare feat of literature, a book that will arouse a shock of recognition even in those readers who have been spared the suffering it describes.

From Publishers Weekly
A meditation on Styron's ( Sophie's Choice ) serious depression at the age of 60, this essay evokes with detachment and dignity the months-long turmoil whose symptoms included the novelist's "dank joylessness," insomnia, physical aversion to alcohol...


Bone Lady: Life as a Forensic Anthropologist
Mary H. Manhein
014029192X
July 2000
Paperback
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From Kirkus Reviews
A subtly creepy collection of stories culled from the experiences of a leading forensic anthropologist. Manhein describes her role as an expert witness as the laying out of her analysis to the jury without a lot of unexplained scientific jargonthe exact technique she employs in this account. While one of her goals seems to be teaching the public about the field of forensic anthropology, she never loses sight of her main intention, the spinning of a good story. The result is a rare, effective blend of entertainment and education. As we follow Manhein into the Louisiana bayou, where she digs up the levee to claim a five-year-old corpse, into industrial fires where victims bodies lie unrecovered, into cemeteries both old, newly discovered, and improvised, under houses, and into the forest to examine the bones of...


Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Louise W. Knight
0226446999
November 2005
Hardcover
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Review
Alan Wolfe New York Times Book Review : "Knight's decision to focus on Addams' early years is a stroke of genius. We know a great deal about Jane Addams the public figure. We know relatively little about how she made the transition from the 19th century to the 20th. In Knight's book, Jane Addams comes to life. . . . Citizen is written neither to make money nor to gain academic tenure; it is a gift, meant to enlighten and improve. Jane Addams would have understood."-Alan Wolfe, New York Times Book Review

Book Description
Jane Addams was the first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Now Citizen, Louise W. Knight's masterful biography, reveals Addams's early development as a political activist and social philosopher.  In this book we...


Iris and Her Friends: A Memoir of Memory and Desire
John Bayley
1402895755

Hardcover
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The Soul of Money
Lynne Twist
0393050971
Sept 2003
Hardcover
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Rachel Naomi Remens, author of Kitchen Table Wisdom
Everyone will get value out of Lynne's message.

Vicki Robin, author of Your Money or Your Life
Lynne's wisdom is the precise healing message about money needed in this time.

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Jung
Deirdre Bair
0316159387
Nov 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Jung's shade would be content with Bair's biography, which in bulk and detail suggests that there is little more to say. Lucid and persuasive, the National Book Award-winning biographer of Beckett strikes a balance between damage control and deification, for Jung's ambition, arrogance and lack of generosity tend now to obscure his originality as a thinker and his impact on theories about why we dream and how we think. While Bair provides perhaps more about almost every aspect of his youth, maturity, rivalries, renown and old age than we care to know, it takes an author's note and two long endnotes to realize how much censorship the Jung heirs still insist upon. Bair was, for example, denied access to the diaries of Jung and his mother, which were deemed "too private," and to the thousand letters between Jung and...


Memories, Dreams, Reflections
C. G. Jung
0679723951
January 1963
Paperback
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Book Description
An autobiography put together from conversations, writings and lectures with Jung's cooperation, at the end of his life.

Language Notes
Text: English, German (translation)

See all Editorial Reviews


In the Arms of Africa
Roy Richard Grinker
0226309045
Nov 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
Colin Turnbull (1924-94) made his reputation with two bestselling works of popular anthropology that tell diametrically opposed tales. The Forest People (1962) holds up the central African Pygmies as examples of the human capacity for communal goodness and love, while The Mountain People (1973) argues that Uganda's Ik tribe, threatened by a killing famine, had cast aside those qualities in favor of soulless individualism. Turnbull's life was as controversial and rife with contradictions as his books, fellow anthropologist Roy Richard Grinker reveals in this absorbing biography. Born in England, Turnbull roamed the world and eventually made his home in America. Product of a conventional, privileged upbringing, he saw himself as a champion for the world's oppressed. He infused anthropology with a passion some deemed...


The Master Plan: Himmler's Scholars and the Holocaust
Heather Pringle
0786868864
February 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Considering the thousands of volumes covering every aspect of the Nazis, it's becoming increasingly difficult to say anything new about their dreadful era. Nevertheless, Pringle (The Mummy Congress), a contributing editor to Discover magazine, gamely steps up to the plate—and has produced a fascinating volume detailing the Nazis' crackpot theories about prehistory and the Indiana Jones–style lengths they went to prove them. Employing a team of researchers, Pringle investigates Heinrich Himmler's private think tank, the Ahnenerbe, which dispatched scholars to the most inhospitable and distant parts of the world to discover evidence of ancient Aryan conquests and the Germans' racial superiority. Some believed their own bizarre garbage; others perverted the facts for personal advancement or prostituted...


John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics
Richard Parker
0374281688
February 2005
Hardcover
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From Amazon.ca
John Kenneth Galbraith has led an extraordinary life. The world's most famous living economist started teaching at Harvard when he was just 25 years old and has sold seven million copies of his four dozen books. One reviewer said Galbraith wrote "history that reads like a poem." During World War II, at age 32, he was named "tsar" of consumer-price controls in the United States, and he later advised three American presidents and served as ambassador to India. Now in his 90s, Galbraith is still active and has received 50 honorary degrees. All this was accomplished by a Canadian born in a tiny Ontario farming hamlet, whose major at an obscure agricultural college wasn't even economics but animal husbandry. Such an irony is typical of Galbraith's renowned iconoclasm, writes Richard Parker in his 820-page biography John...


Love at Goon Park: Harry Harlow and the Science of Affection
Deborah Blum
0641664834

Textbook Hardcover
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God's Beloved
Michael O'Laughlin
1570755612
Oct 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
More than most writers, the Catholic priest Henri Nouwen earned the adjective "beloved" with his penetratingly honest meditations on the Christian life. In this book, Nouwen's Harvard teaching assistant seeks not just to celebrate his friend but also to understand the roots of his spiritual journey. O'Laughlin has a keen sense of Nouwen's uniqueness: "Henri was not living out, nor was he presenting to the world, a universally applicable spiritual program, perhaps because there is no 'universally applicable' spiritual program." He sketches Nouwen's biography, including his childhood in the Netherlands, his frustrating experiences teaching at Yale and Harvard and his final years caring for disabled adults at a religious community in Canada. But the book is less concerned with chronology than sorting out the...


Jung: A Biography
Deirdre Bair
0641712715

Hardcover
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Analyzing Freud

0811216039
Jan 2005
Paperback
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Christine Froula, The Women's Review of Books
This rich trove forms an illuminating supplement to H.D.'s poems and autobiographical writings....will be consulted and cited for decades.

Robert Gottlieb, New York Times Book Review
A fascinating production....Susan Stanford Friedman proves herself to be an excellent editor—scrupulous and thorough.

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The Making of Dr. Phil
Sophia Dembling
047146726X
Jan 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
The first biography of Dr. Phil McGraw and his rise to fame
Millions look to Dr. Phil for advice on everything from relationships to life. But Dr. Phil is more than just a pop psychologist. He's also an amazing businessman who has started and run a number of flourishing ventures. In The Making of Dr. Phil, award-winning journalists Sophia Dembling and Lisa Gutierrez take readers inside the world of Dr. Phil and his media and self-help empire. From his early days as a young athlete and student pilot, to his failed first marriage and decision to study psychology, The Making of Dr. Phil captures the courageous rise of one of today's most well-known celebrities. Full of exclusive interviews, this comprehensive portrait explores Dr. Phil's true motivations and inner drives. It also reveals the full dimension of his...


Songs of the Gorilla Nation: My Journey through Autism
Dawn Prince-Hughes
1400082153
March 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In this affecting, thoughtful memoir, Prince-Hughes explores how working with gorillas helped her escape the feelings of isolation she encountered as a sufferer of Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism characterized by difficulties processing stimuli, sensory sensitivity and social awkwardness. Her description of the course of her condition is both delightfully quixotic and terribly sad. Prince-Hughes's addictions to the smells of purple irises and tin Band-Aid boxes seem harmless enough, but her inability to emotionally connect to other people has terrible consequences. In high school, she is beaten and harshly abused. Trying to cope, she develops a drinking problem, spends months homeless and takes a job as a strip club dancer to make ends meet. A lifeline comes after a trip to the zoo, where the author...

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