Book Finder
    
 
> Biographies & Autobiography > Famous People Biographies A-Z > Arendt Hannah Biography
 

Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
Hannah Arendt
0140187650
January 1994
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
While living in Argentina in 1960, Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann was kidnapped and smuggled to Israel where he was put on trial for crimes against humanity. The New Yorker magazine sent Hannah Arendt to cover the trial. While covering the technical aspects of the trial, Arendt also explored the wider themes inherent in the trial, such as the nature of justice, the behavior of the Jewish leadership during the Nazi Régime, and, most controversially, the nature of Evil itself.

Far from being evil incarnate, as the prosecution painted Eichmann, Arendt maintains that he was an average man, a petty bureaucrat interested only in furthering his career, and the evil he did came from the seductive power of the totalitarian state and an unthinking adherence to the Nazi cause. Indeed, Eichmann's only defense during the...



Hannah Arendt
Julia Kristeva
0231121024
May 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Julia Kristeva's Hannah Arendt brings together two of the best minds in 20th-century philosophy; two who are especially noteworthy because they are visionary women in a field long dominated by men. Appropriately, the book is, in part, a tribute to Arendt, one of a series of looks at female genius. Kristeva brings her considerable scholarly arsenal, which includes linguistics, literary criticism, philosophy, feminism, aesthetics, cultural studies, and psychoanalysis. In particular, her psychoanalytic bent makes for an incisive look at Arendt because she was "gripped from the start by that unique passion in which life and thought are one.... [She] consistently put life--both life itself and life as a concept to be analyzed--at the center of her work."

Arendt is certainly one of the 20th century's brightest intellectual...



Rahel Varnhagen
Hannah Arendt
0156761009
Oct 1974
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
·
 
Book Description
Rahel Varnhagen (1777-1833) lived during the crucial period of assimilation in Germany, when it seemed imperative for Jews to escape their Jewishness.


Hannah Arendt
Julia Kristeva
0231121032
May 2003
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Julia Kristeva's Hannah Arendt brings together two of the best minds in 20th-century philosophy; two who are especially noteworthy because they are visionary women in a field long dominated by men. Appropriately, the book is, in part, a tribute to Arendt, one of a series of looks at female genius. Kristeva brings her considerable scholarly arsenal, which includes linguistics, literary criticism, philosophy, feminism, aesthetics, cultural studies, and psychoanalysis. In particular, her psychoanalytic bent makes for an incisive look at Arendt because she was "gripped from the start by that unique passion in which life and thought are one.... [She] consistently put life--both life itself and life as a concept to be analyzed--at the center of her work."

Arendt is certainly one of the 20th century's brightest intellectual...



Hannah Arendt
Phillip Birger Hansen
0804721459
May 1993
Hardcover
·
 


Hannah Arendt
Phillip Birger Hansen
0804721467
May 1993
Paperback
·
 


Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger
Elzbieta Ettinger
0300064071
Aug 1995
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In 1924, Hannah Arendt, then an 18-year-old assimilated German Jew, fell in love with future Nazi Martin Heidegger, her 35-year-old married philosophy professor at the University of Marburg. Insecure, vulnerable Arendt, whose father died when she was seven, idealized Heidegger, who found in their four-year love affair a passionate physical and spiritual bond. Heidegger joined the Nazi Party and openly declared his support for Hitler in 1933; later that year, Arendt fled Germany and severed her ties with Heidegger. She went on to condemn fascism in The Origins of Totalitarianism, yet in 1950, encouraged by her second husband, Heinrich Bluecher, a German ex-communist and an admirer of Heidegger's philosophy, she resumed a friendship with her erstwhile lover, swallowing his lies that he was a helpless victim of...


Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger
Elzbieta Ettinger
0300072546
Oct 1997
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In 1924, Hannah Arendt, then an 18-year-old assimilated German Jew, fell in love with future Nazi Martin Heidegger, her 35-year-old married philosophy professor at the University of Marburg. Insecure, vulnerable Arendt, whose father died when she was seven, idealized Heidegger, who found in their four-year love affair a passionate physical and spiritual bond. Heidegger joined the Nazi Party and openly declared his support for Hitler in 1933; later that year, Arendt fled Germany and severed her ties with Heidegger. She went on to condemn fascism in The Origins of Totalitarianism, yet in 1950, encouraged by her second husband, Heinrich Bluecher, a German ex-communist and an admirer of Heidegger's philosophy, she resumed a friendship with her erstwhile lover, swallowing his lies that he was a helpless victim of...


Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World
Elisabeth Young-Bruehl
0300105886
September 2004
Paperback
·
 
Review
This highly acclaimed, prize-winning biography of one of the foremost political philosophers of the twentieth century is here reissued in a trade paperback edition for a new generation of readers. In a new preface the author offers an account of writings by and about Arendt that have appeared since the book’s 1982 publication, providing a reassessment of her subject’s life and achievement.


Until the Final Hour: Hitler's Last Secretary
Traudl Junge
1559707569
May 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Like her infamous employer, author Junge struggled with unfulfilled artistic dreams: she traveled to Berlin in 1942 to pursue a career as a dancer and ended up taking dictation for Adolf Hitler. "There were very few days when I didn’t see Hitler, talk to him, work with him or share meals with him," she remembers. Junge’s account, undoubtedly a primer on the so-called "banality of evil," is a detailed, efficient and humorless memoir of the three years she spent as Hitler’s secretary. Her tale—full of trivial tidbits and, often interchangeably, chilling observations—draws a picture of a man at once astonishingly uninspired, quixotic and devoted to his cause. It also documents how the Fuhrer served as a father figure to Junge, whose own parents were divorced. She reveals that her post-war...


Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
Hannah Arendt
0844659770
January 1983
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
While living in Argentina in 1960, Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann was kidnapped and smuggled to Israel where he was put on trial for crimes against humanity. The New Yorker magazine sent Hannah Arendt to cover the trial. While covering the technical aspects of the trial, Arendt also explored the wider themes inherent in the trial, such as the nature of justice, the behavior of the Jewish leadership during the Nazi Régime, and, most controversially, the nature of Evil itself.

Far from being evil incarnate, as the prosecution painted Eichmann, Arendt maintains that he was an average man, a petty bureaucrat interested only in furthering his career, and the evil he did came from the seductive power of the totalitarian state and an unthinking adherence to the Nazi cause. Indeed, Eichmann's only defense during the...



Within Four Walls: The Correspondence between Hannah Arendt and Heinrich Blucher, 1936-1968
Hannah Arendt
0151003033
December 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In the 1930s Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was a Zionist activist and Heinrich Bl cher (1899-1970) was a Communist. Each had escaped Nazi Germany to Paris, where they met, and then moved on together to New York City, where they spent their married life until Bl cher's death. Various editions of Arendt's letters are currently available (exchanges with Heidegger, Karl Jaspers, Hermann Broch and others), but this very fine collection is special because of Arendt's relaxed and unconstrained relationship with her husband. In these letters one senses that Arendt is most fully herself, for better and for worse, than in her other, more formal or otherwise strained relationships (Heidegger was her lover in the 1920s). She and Bl cher speak their minds freely. Their letters contain a few recurring themes that amount to ongoing...


Visible Spaces
Dagmar Barnouw
0801862833
Jan 2000
Paperback
·
 
Review
"This book opens up new and interesting sources for the assessment of Hannah Arendt's writings." -- Elisabeth-Christine Mulsch, German Studies Review
"Barnouw demonstrates an impressive amount of familiarity with Arendt and the departure point of all her thinking; as a German Jew -- and a woman, Barnouw constantly reminds us -- Arendt would remain indebted to the German intellectual culture in which she was educated while witnessing the Holocaust at the same time." -- Kristina R. Sazaki, Seminar
"An independent and critical study by a German intellectual. It is an important contribution to a new German-Jewish dialogue." -- Klaus L. Berghahn, Telos

Book Description
Hannah Arendt still makes people angry. Her writings on the modern German-Jewish experience are deliberately...


Rahel Varnhagen
Hannah Arendt
080186335X
Feb 2000
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Thanks to the diligent researches of Liliane Weissberg, the editor of this new edition... we now finally have the first complete text [of Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess], including the annotations that Arendt herself had been unable to supply because of her abrupt departure from Germany in 1933. For the first time we can find our way through the book's thick forest of quotations and other literary and historical allusions..." -- Amos Elon, New York Review of Books
"Reading Rahel Varnhagen today, I am startled to see that it is neither Jewishness nor womanness that holds my attention. What is striking now are the extraordinary similarities between Rahel's period and our own, and how much a creature of the time she seems to be... Seen against the disturbed and disturbing climate of a time, then as now, in which...


Three Women in Dark Times: Edith Stein, Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil
Sylvie Courtine-Denamy
0801487587
August 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The darkness of the decade 1933-1943 was at least partially illumined by the energetic syntheses of thought and action that Courtine-Denamy (Hannah Arendt) skillfully examines in the three remarkable women of this book's subtitle. What animates the comparison are stark differences overlaid on basic similarities: all three were Jews and philosophers, all were imperiled by the Nazi menace. But by 1943 Stein had become a Carmelite nun and perished in Auschwitz; Weil had allied with the French Resistance and died of malnutrition in London; and Arendt had emigrated to New York, where she called for a Jewish army in Palestine. Weil, whose passions split between politics and religion, serves as linchpin for comparisons with the cloistered nun Stein and the fervently Zionist, eminently unmystical Arendt. Stein, the...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.