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Albert Camus
Herbert R. Lottman
3927258067
July 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
When Albert Camus died in a car crash in January 1960 he was only 46 years old - already a winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature and a world figure - author of the enigmatic The Stranger, the fable called The Plague, but also of the combative The Rebel - which attacked the 'politically correct' among his contemporaries. Thanks to his early literary achievement, his work for the underground newspaper Combat and his editorship of that daily in its Post-Liberation incarnation, Camus' voice seemed the conscience of postwar France. But it was a very personal voice that rejected the conventional wisdom, rejected ideologies that called for killing in the cause of justice. His call for personal responsibility will seem equally applicable today, when Camus' voice is silent and has not been replaced. The secrecy which...


The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt
Albert Camus
0679733841
January 1992
Paperback
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Review
"The Rebel is a piece of reasoning in the great tradition of French logic....But what is so exhilarating about Camus's essay is that here is the voice of a man of unshakable decency." -- Atlantic

"Camus's book is one of the extremely few that express the contemporary hour...yet profoundly transcend it." -- New Republic

Review
"The Rebel is a piece of reasoning in the great tradition of French logic....But what is so exhilarating about Camus's essay is that here is the voice of a man of unshakable decency." -- Atlantic

"Camus's book is one of the extremely few that express the contemporary hour...yet profoundly transcend it." -- New Republic

See all Editorial Reviews


Albert Camus: A Life
Olivier Todd
0679428550
November 1997
Hardcover
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Book Review
Olivier Todd's biography of Albert Camus matches its subject's depth by portraying the man as well as the moralist. Born in Algeria and raised in poverty by an illiterate mother, Camus never forgot where he came from. He made his name in Nazi-occupied Paris--publicly as the author of The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus, covertly as a member of the Resistance and editor of its newspaper, Combat--but he longed for the North African sun of his youth. During the years of crisis when Algeria struggled to break free from France, Camus alienated both colonialists and revolutionaries by supporting full equality for Arabs but denouncing terrorism. "I believe in justice," he told an Algerian heckler at a 1957 meeting he addressed in Stockholm after winning the Nobel Prize. "But I will defend my mother before...


Albert Camus: A Life
Olivier Todd
0786707399
February 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Olivier Todd's biography of Albert Camus matches its subject's depth by portraying the man as well as the moralist. Born in Algeria and raised in poverty by an illiterate mother, Camus never forgot where he came from. He made his name in Nazi-occupied Paris--publicly as the author of The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus, covertly as a member of the Resistance and editor of its newspaper, Combat--but he longed for the North African sun of his youth. During the years of crisis when Algeria struggled to break free from France, Camus alienated both colonialists and revolutionaries by supporting full equality for Arabs but denouncing terrorism. "I believe in justice," he told an Algerian heckler at a 1957 meeting he addressed in Stockholm after winning the Nobel Prize. "But I will defend my mother before...


Albert Camus and the Minister
Howard E. Mumma
1557252467
May 2000
Paperback
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From Library Journal
A half-century ago, the existentialist philosopher Albert Camus went to a Parisian church to hear an outstanding organist but returned on subsequent Sundays to hear the sermons of a visiting American minister. In the book's first half, the minister, Mumma, recollects his friendship with Camus and the philosopher's developing interest in Christianity. Mumma gives impressionistic, anecdotal accounts of Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre, as well as Camus's memories of Simone Weil. Most striking is Camus's requestDwhich Mumma deniedDfor a private re-baptism. Mumma offers the reader a first-person account of existentialism and a generic, mainstream Christian response. In the second half, Mumma offers touching vignettes from his life and ministry, concluding with reflections on life's purpose. While this book does not address...


Albert Camus in New York
Herbert R. Lottman
3927258407
August 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
"If it had not actually taken place I should have been tempted, when writing a biography of Albert Camus, to invent his visit to my birthplace city" says Lottman in his foreword to Albert Camus in New York, specially published to introduce the monumental biography. Lottman continues: "The timing of the actual event - for it did happen - is touched with irony. By then Camus was a hero in Paris, a still young and brilliant author of eminently readable yet challenging works, perhaps more widely known as editor-in-chief of Combat, a daily newspaper born of the wartime Resistance. Now, as front-page editorialist of a paper and a movement pledged to change France, Albert Camus was seen as a moral guide for the postwar. He was also a very likeable hero, looking even younger than his years, dapper in his Humphrey Bogart...


Correspondence, 1932-1960
Albert Camus
0803214979
May 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
As a philosophy teacher, mentor, and friend, Jean Grenier (1898–1971) had an enormous influence on the young Albert Camus (1913–1960), who, in fact, acknowledged that Grenier’s Les Iles had touched the very core of his sensibility and provided him with both a "terrain for reflection, and a format" that he would later use for his own essays. Their correspondence, beginning when the seventeen-year-old Camus was Grenier’s student at the Grand Lycée of Algiers, documents the younger man’s struggle to become a writer and find his own voice, a period in which he turned frequently to his mentor for advice, comfort, and direction. The letters cover a period of almost thirty years, from 1932 to Camus’s untimely death in 1960. Because Camus destroyed the earlier correspondence he received, the...


Albert Camus (Bloom's Biocritiques Series)
Harold Bloom (Editor)
0791073815
April 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Dying at the young age of 46, Albert Camus nevertheless seems to have completed a life's work. The Myth of Sisyphus, critics suggest, is his one work that may transcend being a period-piece. Learn more about Camus with this text, which includes an extensive biography of the author, literary criticism, a list of works by and about the author, and more. This series is edited by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University; Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Professor of English, New York University Graduate School; preeminent literary critic of our time. The lives of the greatest writers of the world are explored in the new series Bloom’s BioCritiques. In addition to a lengthy biography, each book includes an extensive critical analysis of the writer’s work, as well as critical views by...


Colonial and Anti-Colonial DisCourses: Albert Camus and Algeria (an Intertextual Dialogue with Mouloud Mammeri, Mouloud Feraoun, and Mohammed Dib)
Ena C. Vulor
0761818162
December 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
Colonial and Anti-colonial Discourses: Albert Camus and Algeria underscores the relationship between literature, history and politics. The comparative historical-cultural analysis of the works of Albert Camus, Mouloud Mammeri, Mouloud Feraoun, and Mohammed Dib provides not only interesting perspective from which to re-evaluate Camus' fiction, but also an extremely valuable insight into the colonial history and politics of Algeria. The author examines the ideological parameters - colonial history, French assimilationist practices, politics of citizenship, etc. - that provide a generative context for the birth of Algerian Literature in French. The work's strength and contribution to scholarship, particularly, to the growing field of post-colonial cultural critique, lie in its attempt to read the fictions of Camus from...


Existential Fiction of Ayi Kwei Armah, Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre
Tommie Lee Jackson
0761803769
January 1996
Textbook Hardcover
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Book Description
Existentialism is a philosophy that flourishes in extreme situations. Identified with the period of the French Resistance when Frenchmen were held as political prisoners by the Germans, existentialism, with its call for an uncompromised allegiance to a leftist system of values, served to boost the sagging morale of French political prisoners who had witnessed during the Occupation the subversion of their nation's democratic principles by German totalitarianism. The author finds in post-independence Ghana another example of an extreme situation which has given rise to the existentialist patterns in the novels of the Ghanaian author Ayi Kwei Armah. The identification of a crisis situation in post-independence Ghana, comparable to that created by the German occupation of France during World War II, serves largely as the...

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