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Cobb: A Biography
Al Stump
1565121449
March 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
Not long before his death, Ty Cobb, as complex and haunted a human being as ever stepped onto a diamond, tapped a young writer named Al Stump to collaborate with him on his autobiography. The result, My Life in Baseball: The True Record, never came close to reaching first base; with Cobb (holder of the game's highest lifetime batting average and lowest lifetime reputation) calling the signals, it was an antiseptic whitewash, as false as its titular claim would have you believe otherwise. Hidden between the lines was the living hell that Cobb--reclusive, bitter, ravaged with cancer, in great pain, and shunned by the baseball community--put Stump through to make sure his demon-filled story was properly sanitized.

Some 30 years later, Stump brilliantly wrought his revenge with the best tool a writer can wield: absolute...



TY Cobb
Charles C. C. Alexander
0195035984
January 1984
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Ty Cobb was one of the most famous baseball players who every lived. The author puts Cobb into the context of his times, describing the very different game on the field then, and successfully probes Cobb's complex personality.

From the Publisher
10 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Baseball's Greatest Hitters: (Step into Reading Books Series: A Step 4 Book)
Sydelle A. Kramer
0375805834
March 2000
Paperback
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From Booklist
Gr. 2^-4. Kramer introduces young readers to five of baseball's greatest hitters--Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, and Hank Aaron. For each Hall of Famer, the author offers a biographical sketch and a chart of career statistics. He explains the players' strengths and weaknesses (both on and off the field) and provides play-by-play action for significant games. A final chapter briefly profiles six other batters. The illustrations, a mix of black-and-white and color photos and drawings, help to clarify the text and, combined with short chapters and large print, make for an attractive and nonthreatening layout. Similar to other beginning nonfiction titles in this Step into Reading series (for example, Kramer's To The Top! [1993]), this will be popular with baseball fans. Kay Weisman --This...


TY Cobb
Norman L. Macht
0791011720
January 1993
Hardcover
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Heroes of Baseball: The Men Who Made It America's Favorite Game
Robert Lipsyte
0689867417
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Lipsyte (The Contender) structures this lively history of the National Pastime as a collective biography of, as the subtitle states, "The Men Who Made It America's Favorite Game"—including some of its biggest stars, and a few lesser-known, but equally influential players. He begins with "Big Al" Spalding, a premier pitcher, team owner and sporting goods titan, who spearheaded the early campaign to elevate baseball from just a game into a virtuous and "uniquely American" pursuit. The author contrasts Ty Cobb's style of play ("mean") with Babe Ruth's ("larger-than-life") to chart changes in how the game is played—from "small ball" to an emphasis on Big Bats. Recent congressional hearings may lead some to quibble with his choice to include Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, but Lipsyte makes a persuasive case...


My Prison Without Bars
Pete Rose
1579549276
January 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
Pete Rose's My Prison Without Bars is written for a purpose: to make Pete Rose's case for the Hall of Fame. On paper, Rose's credentials seem unassailable. The all-time career hits leader, Rose owns seven Major League and twelve National League records from his 24 years in baseball.

The controversy comes down to Major League Baseball's Rule 21: "Any... employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible." In 1989 Rose was suspended from baseball after allegations that he gambled on the sport, allegations Rose denied. Thereafter, fans and sportswriters have speculated that baseball officials would re-instate Rose if only he admitted his guilt. In the book, Rose confesses--for the first time--that he did in fact...



TY Cobb (Baseball's All-Time Greatest Hitters)
Dan Holmes
0313328692
October 2004
Hardcover
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Review
“A fress and fair-handed look at the life of baseball's premier, violence-prone battsman.”–Foreword this Week

Book Description
When the National Baseball Hall of Fame inducted its first class of players in 1936, Ty Cobb received more votes than any other player-even more than did fellow inductee Babe Ruth. Cobb, known as the "Georgia Peach," was universally recognized as the best player from the "dead ball" era. He also had the reputation of being its most ferocious player. His fierce determination to succeed helped Cobb equal or surpass more offensive records than any other player, and his career average of .367 is still the highest of all time. Cobb's unyielding and often ferocious work ethic, though, made him many enemies, and his occasional episodes of violence...


The Ty Cobb Scrapbook
Marc Okkonen
0806928476
June 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
Relive the thrill of 24 years in the career of the fabled "Georgia Peach"--one of the greatest, most colorful, and simply larger-than-life baseball players who ever lived. Arranged in a visually exciting scrapbook format, packed with pictures and memorabilia that illustrate every significant date and more than 800 games, it takes you from April 26, 1904, when the 17-year-old Tyrus Raymond Cobb stepped up to the plate for the first time professionally, till his final turn on the field in 1928. The focus is on his playing, rather than on his oft-discussed personality and private life, with commentary culled from contemporary accounts that reveal how Cobb's swift throwing arm and fine batting skills contributed to every game. A generous sampling of photographs, cartoons, and ads from the period--many not seen since their...


Busting 'EM and Other Big League Stories
Ty Cobb
0786415991
February 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Published in 1914, Busting ’Em was the first of three books credited to Ty Cobb the author. Though in fact it was ghostwritten by John N. Wheeler, who also penned Mathewson’s Pitching in a Pinch, the book fascinates with its insights into Cobb as a public figure. The reader is presented Cobb’s explanation of the beating incident at Hilltop Park, the Baker spiking, and his contentious relationship with teammates. His thoughts—or those he sanctioned—of umpires, his contemporaries, crowds, and strategy are also shared. This book, long out of print and increasingly hard to find, is essential reading for those who would understand Cobb’s awareness of and investment in the shape of his public image.

About the Author
Ty Cobb played major league baseball...


Peach: Ty Cobb in His Time and Ours
Richard Bak
1587262576
May 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Although it has been more than 75 years since he last laced up his spikes, Ty Cobb remains arguably the greatest player in the long history of baseball. Certainly the Detroit Tigers outfielder remains the most controversial. He hit .367 over 24 seasons (1905-1928), won a dozen batting titles, and was the first man elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. But it was his blowtorch personality that set the "Georgia Peach" apart from all others.

From the Inside Flap
Timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Cobb's 1905 debut in the major leagues, and featuring 150 rarely seen photographs, Peach provides a balanced analysis of this baseball icon's life inside and outside the game, with particular emphasis on his treatment in pop culture and public memory.

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