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Leonard Cohen
David Sheppard
1560252707
July 2000
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Because the subjects of the publisher's "Kill Your Idols" series are "unafraid of experimentation," "hold nothing sacred," and "inspire skepticism of idol-making in their listeners" (for the most part), they are perhaps more magnetic than popular music's traditional gods and goddesses. These anti-idols may not have directly sprung from the pelvis of Elvis, but they are related to the Velvet One. Here, original research is not the point (rabid fans have frayed these musicians' yarns anyway); the authors relied on each performer's standard biography, documentaries, liner notes, and other sources to relate a condensed chronology of career and personal highs and lows. Rather, this is a chance for a "professional" fan (read: a music critic) to express his opinions on the roles that pompousness, vision, and circumstance...


Hydra and the Bananas of Leonard Cohen: A Midlife Crisis in the Sun
Roger Green
0465027598
September 2003
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
A British poet turns 53, moves to a Greek island, becomes obsessed with the island's most famous ex-resident-singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen-and writes a book about it all. It's an eclectic mixture of memoir, diary, scrapbook and philosophical ramblings. Green, the poet, finds himself living next door to a garden full of banana trees owned by 1970s pop star Cohen (referred to only by the initial "L."). Inexplicably, Green becomes powerfully attracted to the bananas and their absent owner. He begins to see bananas everywhere: in the Old Testament (did Adam and Eve clothe themselves in banana leaves?), in Robbe-Grillet poems, on the cover of L.'s album I'm Your Man. He even goes so far as to befriend some of L.'s old acquaintances on the island, including a fellow poet and L.'s former lover, Suzanne, who is, alas,...


The Song of Leonard Cohen: Portrait of a Poet, a Friendship, and a Film
Harry Rasky
0889627428
June 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
A memoir of the author's 1981 documentary, The Song of Leonard Cohen. Harry Rasky filmed the wild trip that was the 1979Field Commander Cohen tour. Now he has delved into his personal archives and diaries upon which the film is based, and has woven them into this moving, powerful text. He includes outrageous and intimate interludes with the great Canadian singer-songwriter, including how he and Leonard were mistaken for Bader-Meinhof terrorists by soldiers with machine guns at a German Burger King Included also are Rasky's never-before-published Bob Dylan Diaries, based on his notes and observations during the filming of a never-completed documentary.

About the Author
Harry Rasky, a producer, director and writer, received 200+ prizes for his work, including the Venice Film...


Dylan and Cohen: Poets of Rock and Roll
David Boucher
0826459811
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen are widely acknowledged as the great pop poets of the 1960s, transforming the popular song into a medium for questionng the personal, social, and political norms of their times. They emerged at a time when the music industry was transforming the revolutionary sound of black music into something bland, homogenous, and fit for mass consumption. For many members of their generation, Dylan and Cohen were able to articulate what they were feeling and could not express: anti-establishement anger, angst, and despondency. Dylan and Cohen is a fascinating political, psychological and artistic profile of these two iconic writers and performers. With reference to both biographical details and lyrics. David Boucher explores their similarities and differences, tracing the development of religious...


Machers and Rockers: Chess Records and the Business of Rock & Roll (Enterprise Series)
Rich Cohen
039305280X
September 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In a postscript to his dynamic history of Chess Records, Cohen (Tough Jews) confesses that its tale is one he's been telling since adolescence, "using whatever was at hand to make the case: not only does this song rock, it also has something big to tell us." Cohen's book has something big to say too—about how the unlikely marriage of the shtetl and the plantation produced Chicago blues and rock and roll. The music that exploded into the living rooms of America and the world might have remained in the juke joints of the South if not for "record men" like Leonard Chess, whose label is rivaled only by Atlantic for its influence. Sensing an audience where the big labels didn't, Chess carted unvarnished recordings of artists like Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley and Chuck Berry in the trunk of his Cadillac, getting them...


Favorite Game
Daniel James Cohen
1400033624
October 2003
Paperback
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Review
"He is a writer of terrific energy and color, a Rabelaisian comic and a visualizer of memorable scenes." --The Observer

“Is there any Canadian novel as compelling and as good as at capturing youthful anxieties as J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye? Absolutely. . . . Leonard Cohen’s first novel, The Favorite Game.” –Globe & Mail

The Favorite Game is a morally brave book, intimate and unflinching. . . . Leonard Cohen sustains the highest level of poetic craftsmanship throughout.” –Paul Quarrington

“It is the kind of book that becomes a law unto itself, simply because there is nothing with which to compare it.” –Calgary Albertan

Review
"He is a...


The Record Men: The Chess Brothers and the Birth of Rock & Roll (Enterprise)
Rich Cohen
0393327507
October 2005
Paperback
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Jason Berry, Chicago Tribune
Cohen does a great job of capturing the intensity of upstart record men like Chess.

David Ulin, Washington Post
It's a great story, and Cohen is ideally suited to tell it….[He] writes with the jagged rhythms of the street.

See all Editorial Reviews


Memoirs of a Bastard Angel
Harold Norse
1560253851
May 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Norse ( Beat Hotels ) immerses the reader in bohemian and gay subcultures in this freewheeling, name-dropping autobiography. In the early, slightly acrimonious chapters, W. H. Auden steals his lover, Chester Kallman, who became Auden's lifelong companion. Norse dispenses an abundance of stories: he read James Baldwin's first novel in an early draft; he shared a cabin with Tennessee Williams in Massachusetts; William Carlos Williams was a mentor of sorts; Jackson Pollock and Dylan Thomas were his drinking buddies. He spent time in Paris with William Burroughs; lived in Rome; practiced Buddhist meditation in Spain; made the Venice, Calif., "scene" in the late 1960s. Among the friends and acquaintances here are Anais Nin, Ezra Pound, Charles Bukowski, Paul Bowles and John Cage. Yet some of this memoir's most...

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