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His Holiness the Dalai Lama
Deborah Hart Strober
047168001X
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The Strobers, who have written oral biographies of John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, use the same techniques here for an oral biography of Tibet's famous spiritual leader. They begin by offering brief profiles of the 54 interviewees, ranging from Western Buddhist VIPs like Robert Thurman, Jeffrey Hopkins and Lama Surya Das (an American convert from Judaism) to Tibetan lamas and monks, including Venerable Lama Thubten Zoba Rinpoche and Lama Lobsang Thamcho Nyima. (Refreshingly, this volume doesn't pander to Hollywood celebrities; Richard Gere is the only famous entertainer interviewed, and he has some genuinely insightful things to say.) The authors arrange the interviewees' snippets thematically, beginning with the lama's basic appeal and personal character before moving through his life...


Freedom in Exile: The Autobiography of the Dalai Lama
Dalai Lama
0060987014
August 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
The Dalai Lama's autobiography should leave no one in doubt of his humility and genuine compassion. Written without the slightest hint of pretense, the exiled leader of Tibet recounts his life, from the time he was whisked away from his home in 1939 at the age of 4, to his treacherous escape from Tibet in 1959, to his winning of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. The backdrop of the story is the 1950 Chinese invasion of Tibet. He calmly relates details of imprisonment, torture, rape, famine, ecological disaster, and genocide that under four decades of Chinese rule have left 1.25 million Tibetans dead and the Tibetan natural and religious landscapes decimated. Yet the Dalai Lama's story is strangely one of hope. This man who prays for four hours a day harbors no ill will toward the Chinese and sees the potential for good...


The Dalai Lama
Claude B. Levenson
0195656504
Feb 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Based partly on personal interviews, this is the story of the Dalai Lama's prodigious life--of how a lively child from a modest peasant family came to be recognized as the fourteenth reincarnation of the Buddha of Infinite Compassion. The book also portrays a vivid and important civilization
based on an exuberant and sophisticated Buddhist tradition.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


The Dalai Lama: A Biography
Patricia Cronin M. Marcello
0313322074
February 2003
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 10 Up-This biography of the exiled Tibetan leader makes up in depth of detail what it lacks in objectivity. Drawing extensively from the Dalai Lama's own published memoirs and many other accounts of his life and the situation in Tibet, Marcello's lengthy, strictly chronological account begins with the subject's birth, selection for the position, education, and career, concluding with a short chapter on his present life. The author clearly supports the Dalai Lama's position against Chinese occupation of Tibet; the Chinese position is mentioned in several scattered places but not explained. She often reports individuals' positions and feelings without attribution, though all of the direct quotations are footnoted. The writing style is fairly clear, but dry. Illustrations are limited to a two-page...


Scar Tissue
Anthony Kiedis
1401307450
October 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
For a musician who has spent the better half of his life either intoxicated or on a drug high, Kiedis, the lead singer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, has produced a surprisingly detailed account of his life. Raised in the 1960s and '70s by a drug dealer father who first introduced his preteen son to drugs by mashing them into bananas, the high school delinquent and UCLA dropout seemed destined for a life of rabble-rousing until his high school band—cofounded by close friends Michael "Flea" Balzary and Hillel Slovak—took off and became one of the most popular groups of the 1990s. Though he peppers his book with little known facts (for instance, the author narrowly missed being named Clark Gable Kiedis), the punk-funk rocker dedicates too few pages to his introspective music-writing process and too many...


Kundun
Mary Craig
1887178910
Sept 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
The Dalai Lama isn't the only religious icon in his family. He has two brothers who are also tulkas, or reincarnated religious leaders, and his parents and other siblings became revered by dint of their relationships to him. Mary Craig chronicles this intriguing web of familial, religious, and national loyalties that bind these people to a destiny unsought and unshakable.

Craig presents this god-king and his family in plain, human terms: from poor peasant upbringing, to tedious and isolated education, to bewilderment at the utter complexity of the political affairs he and his family are fated to confront. In Kundun, you enter the daily life of this family to experience the simple beauty of Tibetan culture, the trauma of brutal oppression and exile, and the protracted hope of redemption through nonviolent...



Buddha
Karen Armstrong
0143034367
September 2004
Paperback
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Book Review's Best of 2001
Books on Buddhism may overflow the shelves, but the life story of the Buddha himself has remained obscure despite over 2,500 years of influence on millions of people around the world. In an attempt to rectify this, and to make the Buddha and Buddhism accessible to Westerners, the beloved scholar and author of such sweeping religious studies as A History of God has written a readable, sophisticated, and somewhat unconventional biography of one of the most influential people of all time. Buddha himself fought against the cult of personality, and the Buddhist scriptures were faithful, giving few details of his life and personality. Karen Armstrong mines these early scriptures, as well as later biographies, then fleshes the story out with an explanation of the cultural landscape of the 6th century B.C., creating a...


An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World
Pankaj Mishra
0312425090
October 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Mishra (The Romantics) offers an ambitious "book-length essay" that combines an overview of the life, times and teachings of the Buddha with personal anecdotes and extended multidisciplinary forays into realms such as ancient and modern history, philosophy, politics and literary criticism. If Mishra's approach is broad, it is also deep and often effective. For example, his close reading of early Indian scriptures and his historical-political examination of the Buddha's society bring to life a "half-mythical antiquity" that, in turn, helps the reader see the Buddha's teachings afresh: not as generic spiritual truisms but rather as specific responses to particular religious and social conditions. Yet the book fails to anchor its broad perspective in a strong central thesis. While it follows the chronology of the...


Third Eye
T. Lobsang Rampa
0345340388
June 1986
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
T. Lobsang Rampa was preordained to be a Tibetan priest, a sign from the stars that could not be ignored. When he left his wealthy home to enter the monastery, his heart was filled with trepidation, with only a slight knowledge of the rigorous spiritual training and physical ordeal that awaited him . . . .
This is his story, a hauntingly beautiful and deeply inspiring journey of awakening within Chakpori Lamasery, the temple of Tibetan medicine. It is a moving tale of passage through the mystic arts of astral projection, crystal gazing, aura deciphering, meditation, and more, a spiritual guide of enlightenment and discovery through the opening of the all-powerful, the all-knowing . . . .
"Fascinates the reader!" -- Miami Herald

Inside Flap Copy
T. Lobsang Rampa...


Scar Tissue
Anthony Kiedis
1401301010
October 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
For a musician who has spent the better half of his life either intoxicated or on a drug high, Kiedis, the lead singer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, has produced a surprisingly detailed account of his life. Raised in the 1960s and '70s by a drug dealer father who first introduced his preteen son to drugs by mashing them into bananas, the high school delinquent and UCLA dropout seemed destined for a life of rabble-rousing until his high school band—cofounded by close friends Michael "Flea" Balzary and Hillel Slovak—took off and became one of the most popular groups of the 1990s. Though he peppers his book with little known facts (for instance, the author narrowly missed being named Clark Gable Kiedis), the punk-funk rocker dedicates too few pages to his introspective music-writing process and too many...


Wisdom of Forgiveness
Dalai Lama
1594480923
August 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"Do you hate the Chinese?" Chan asked the Dalai Lama when they first met in India in 1972. It was a live question, since Chan hailed from the country that had forced the Tibetan spiritual leader into exile and subjugated the Tibetan people. The Dalai Lama replied immediately with the English word "no," then stated through an interpreter that he had forgiven the Chinese and did not blame China's people. Drawing on Buddhist principles, this book loosely discusses His Holiness's ideas on forgiveness, though Chan presents them gently through stories, not didactically as a step-by-step how-to manual. For example, one chapter arises in the context of the Dalai Lama's travels in war-torn Belfast, where he spoke about forgiveness to the families of victims of terrorist attacks. To research this book, Chan traveled with...


Seven Years in Tibet
Heinrich Harrer
0874778883
September 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
Originally published in 1953, this adventure classic recounts Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer's 1943 escape from a British internment camp in India, his daring trek across the Himalayas, and his happy sojourn in Tibet, then, as now, a remote land little visited by foreigners. Warmly welcomed, he eventually became tutor to the Dalai Lama, teenaged god-king of the theocratic nation. The author's vivid descriptions of Tibetan rites and customs capture its unique traditions before the Chinese invasion in 1950, which prompted Harrer's departure. A 1996 epilogue details the genocidal havoc wrought over the past half-century. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From AudioFile
In this fascinating memoir Pigott-Smith's intonations reveal practically...


Socrates, Buddha, Confucius, Jesus: From The Great Philosophers, Volume I
Karl Jaspers
0156835800
March 1966
Paperback
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Amazon.com
Arguably the four most influential individuals in human history, Socrates, the Buddha, Confucius and Jesus have cast shadows on history that are nearly inescapable even today. Who were they, what were their doctrines, and what was their influence? These are some of the questions that the 20th-century philosopher Karl Jaspers explores in this short excerpt from his larger volume, Great Philosophers.

Book Description
A part of JaspersÂ’s planned universal history of philosophy, focusing on the four paradigmatic individuals who have exerted a historical influence of incomparable scope and depth. Edited by Hannah Arendt; Index. Translated by Ralph Manheim.

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