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Cigars, Whiskey and Winning
Al Kaltman
0735201633
Apr 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
"Ulysses S. Grant was a perceptive and surprisingly modern manager," writes Al Kaltman. "A pragmatist who learned from his own and others' successes and failures, he brought new dimensions to strategic planning. He was adept at seizing and exploiting opportunities as they presented themselves, and he boldly shattered paradigms long before the term paradigm had made its way into the management jargon."

Kaltman uses Grant's military career, beginning with his enrollment at West Point through his early successes in the Civil War to his eventual command of the entire Union Army, to illustrate 250 basic principles of business success, from "Bureaucrats do the dumbest things" to "You can't stop the clock." In an afterword, Kaltman considers how President Grant failed to live up to the principles of teamwork and planning that...



Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
0914427679
May 1992
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Grant was sick and broke when he began work on his Memoirs. Driven by financial worries and a desire to provide for his wife, he wrote diligently during a year of deteriorating health. He vowed he would finish the work before he died. One week after its completion, he lay dead at the age of 63. Publication of the Memoirs came at a time when the public was being treated to a spate of wartime reminiscences, many of them defensive in nature, seeking to refight battles or attack old enemies. Grant's penetrating and stately work reveals a nobility of spirit and an innate grasp of the important fact, which he rarely displayed in private life. He writes in his preface that he took up the task "with a sincere desire to avoid doing injustice to anyone, whether on the National or the Confederate side."


Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
0140437010
January 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In 1862, a prominent Republican visited President Lincoln and called General Ulysses S. Grant an incompetent drunk who created unnecessary political problems. Lincoln, frustrated with all his generals but this one, famously replied: "I can't spare this man; he fights." Indeed, Lincoln had gone through a series of unheroic generals before settling on Grant to lead the Union's Army of the Potomac. Grant's success at marshaling the industrial might of the North eventually pounded the South into submission. This memoir, finished as its author was dying of throat cancer in 1885, is widely admired for its clear and straightforward prose. The volume was an enormously popular hit upon publication (by Mark Twain, no less), and today Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant ranks among the finest pieces of military...


Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War
Charles Bracelen Flood
0374166005
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The lives of Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman are classic underdog stories. Both of these "obscure failures" experienced more disappointment than success prior to the start of the Civil War. By 1861, they had each resigned from the U.S. Army and failed in several civilian pursuits between them, including farming, real estate, retail, and banking. Further, Grant was known as a drunk and Sherman was labeled insane. But once they threw themselves into the war effort, their best traits and talents began to reveal themselves. Even their motives were similar--both men joined the war not to eradicate slavery but to hold the Union together, believing that secession was equal to treason. This dual biography gracefully reveals how the two men grew to be "as brothers," why their partnership proved essential to victory for the...


Ulysses S. Grant
Michael Korda
0060590157
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This little book will inevitably be compared with Josiah Bunting's similarly short biography of one of the world's greatest military figures. The marriage of author and subject works well, although Korda (Horse People: Scenes from the Riding Life, etc.) doesn't have much new to say about Lincoln's favorite general. That's not surprising, since everyone now writes about Grant in the shadow of Edmund Wilson, who gave new fame to Grant's memoirs, and William McFeely, who has written the best full biography to date. Even so, Korda freshly characterizes his man without psychologizing an unpromising subject. Grant was, after all, unyieldingly stolid and tight-lipped. While his qualities of directness and taciturnity made him a great general, they didn't yield up a fascinating man or a great president. Korda does about...


Ulysses S, Grant: Memoirs and Selected Letters (Library of America)
Ulysses S. Grant
0940450585
October 1990
Textbook Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
While the complete writings of this pair of Civil Warriors would fill several shelves, the material contained in this two-volume boxed set offers a good selection of their letters and personal reminiscences. Though both of these men are certainly not the most inspirational figures of American history, as two of the paladins of the Union Army, however, Grant and Sherman offer firsthand insights into the waging of the war that cannot be found elsewhere. As historical documents, the significance of these papers is obvious, but the texts also score high points for the quality of the writing itself; Sherman's reflections were hailed by Mark Twain as "a model narrative that will last as long as the language lasts." The hub of the material, of course, focuses on the war years, but Sherman's volume also contains memoirs of...


American Presidents Eminent Lives Boxed Set
Paul Johnson
0060844760
Nov 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description

Eminent Lives
In American Political History

A perfect gift for your favorite history huff, or for your own collection, this set from the acclaimed Eminent Lives series is a must for anyone interested in the story of America.

George Washington: The Founding Father

Celebrated journalist and historian Paul Johnson paints a vivid portrait of George Washington as a young entrepreneur, masterly commander-in-chief, patient Constitution maker, and wise president.

Thomas Jefferson: Author of America

Internationally renowned writer and political commentator Christopher Hitchens explores the life of Thomas Jefferson within the context of America's evolution, bringing him to life as both a man of his time and as a visionary who could see beyond it.

Ulysses S. Grant: The Unlikely Hero

Legendary editor...



Grant
Jean Edward Smith
0684849275
April 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Hiram Ulysses Grant--mistakenly enrolled in the United States Military Academy as Ulysses Simpson Grant, and so known ever since--was a failure in many of the things to which he turned his hand. An indifferent, somewhat undisciplined cadet who showed talent for mathematics and painting, he served with unexpected distinction in the U.S. war against Mexico, then repeatedly went broke as a real-estate speculator, freighter, and farmer. His reputation was restored in the Civil War, in which he fulfilled a homespun philosophy of battle: "Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can and as often as you can, and keep moving on." Given to dark moods and the solace of the bottle (although far less so than his political foes made him out to be), Grant was ferocious in war, but...


A Victor, Not a Butcher
Edward H. Bonekemper, III
089526062X
May 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In line with the recent rise in the Union military leader’s stock among historians, this engaging if reverential study pegs Grant as the greatest general of the Civil War. Historian Bonekemper (How Robert E. Lee Lost the Civil War) contends that Grant relied whenever possible on maneuver, distraction and stealth rather than brute force, and that his brilliantly successful campaigns were marked by comparatively modest body counts. Even the bloody war of attrition against Lee in 1864, the main count in the "butcher" indictment, was a strategically sound approach, he says, with its carnage less the fault of Grant than of inept subordinates who squandered the opportunities created by his flanking maneuvers. The author’s celebration of Grant dovetails with his disparagement of Lee, whom he feels lacked...


Ulysses S. Grant (American Presidents Series)
Josiah Bunting
0805069496
September 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This study is among the best in the notable series of short presidential biographies presided over by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. While recent biographers have taken a more sympathetic view of Grant than formerly, Bunting goes further to show that Grant possessed that rarest quality among American presidents: nobility of character. He acknowledges Grant's youthful tippling and the defects of his presidency. But as a veteran military officer himself, Bunting (An Education for Our Time) captures Grant's brilliance as a strategist, his quiet compassion, his firm judgment and his humanity as the Union's principal military leader. Then, where other historians hold Grant's administration responsible for many of the failures of Reconstruction, Bunting believes Grant was in his era "the central force in the achievement of...


Grant: As Military Commander
James Marshall-Cornwall
1566199131
July 1995
Hardcover
·
 


Eminent Lives
Michael Korda
0060878754
Feb 2006
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Tsoutsouvas offers a fitting voice for this collection of minibiographies of American presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Ulysses S. Grant. His narration is professorial without feeling remote, and his precise inflections and seasoned cadences work well to enliven the drier historical information. In George Washington: The Founding Father, Tsoutsouvas delivers a straightforward rendition of Johnson's historical portrait. Tsoutsouvas's clear-voiced narration of Washington's career as land surveyor, morally heroic commander, Constitution maker reminds listeners why Washington still matters, not only for shaping the executive office but the republic as a whole. Hitchens's treatment of the nation's third president in Thomas Jefferson: Author of America, paints a vivid picture of early American life and...


Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
0306810611
Oct 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In 1862, a prominent Republican visited President Lincoln and called General Ulysses S. Grant an incompetent drunk who created unnecessary political problems. Lincoln, frustrated with all his generals but this one, famously replied: "I can't spare this man; he fights." Indeed, Lincoln had gone through a series of unheroic generals before settling on Grant to lead the Union's Army of the Potomac. Grant's success at marshaling the industrial might of the North eventually pounded the South into submission. This memoir, finished as its author was dying of throat cancer in 1885, is widely admired for its clear and straightforward prose. The volume was an enormously popular hit upon publication (by Mark Twain, no less), and today Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant ranks among the finest pieces of military...


Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant (The Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading Series)
Ulysses S. Grant
0760749906
August 2004
Paperback
·
 


Ulysses S. Grant
Edward G. Longacre
030681269X
July 2006
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
A fresh new look at General Grant's great battlefield victories, before and during the Civil War, and the effect that his conflicted personality had on his military career Despite his reputation for rash decisions, brutal tactics, and intemperate behavior, Ulysses S. Grant was the only Union general who could win the war for Lincoln. Grant's aggressive strategies, swift movements and uncompromising battlefield attacks were praised in the North, feared in the South, and reviled by many of his own associates and staff. General Grant is, perhaps, one of the most controversial, enigmatic, and misunderstood generals in our nation's history. In this new biography of Grant, acclaimed Civil War historian, Edward G. Longacre, examines Grant's early life, military training at West Point, and his later military career for...


Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War
Written and Read by Charles Bracelen Flood
0060857412
September 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
The lives of Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman are classic underdog stories. Both of these "obscure failures" experienced more disappointment than success prior to the start of the Civil War. By 1861, they had each resigned from the U.S. Army and failed in several civilian pursuits between them, including farming, real estate, retail, and banking. Further, Grant was known as a drunk and Sherman was labeled insane. But once they threw themselves into the war effort, their best traits and talents began to reveal themselves. Even their motives were similar--both men joined the war not to eradicate slavery but to hold the Union together, believing that secession was equal to treason. This dual biography gracefully reveals how the two men grew to be "as brothers," why their partnership proved essential to victory for the...


Ulysses S. Grant
Geoffrey Perret
037575220X
Nov 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Ulysses S. Grant worked with Red Cloud, chief of the Lakota Sioux, to create an arguably more humane Indian policy--"no president could have done more," argues Geoffrey Perret, whose reassessment of Grant as a politician is his biography's finest achievement. Not that he scants his subject's military genius; the relentless, aggressive campaigns that won the Civil War are skillfully outlined and analyzed. Grant emerges in this nuanced portrait as a quintessential American: he is depicted as a restless rover perpetually in search of "movement, drama, adventure." Firmly situated in his time, he nonetheless seems a strikingly modern man. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
Often dismissed as a butcher...


Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant, Vol. 2
Ulysses S. Grant
1595401253
September 2004
Paperback
·
 
Download Description
Man proposes and God disposes. There are but few important events in the affairs of men brought about by their own choice. Although frequently urged by friends to write my memoirs I had determined never to do so, nor to write anything for publication. At the age of nearly sixty-two I received an injury from a fall, which confined me closely to the house while it did not apparently affect my general health. This made study a pleasant pastime. Shortly after, the rascality of a business partner developed itself by the announcement of a failure. This was followed soon after by universal depression of all securities, which seemed to threaten the extinction of a good part of the income still retained, and for which I am indebted to the kindly act of friends. At this juncture the editor of the Century Magazine asked...

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