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Ben Hogan: An American Life
James Dodson
0767908635
May 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Ben Hogan is widely credited with ushering in the modern era of golf. His legendary practice sessions, intense perfectionism and iron determination helped turn a lazy gentleman's game into a high-stakes, competitive sport. Yet Hogan's unprecedented achievements on the golf course were often overshadowed by his fierce demeanor and public reticence, which fueled wild speculations about every aspect of his guarded life and gave birth to countless myths and misrepresentations. Dodson (Final Rounds) resurrects the flesh-and-blood man from the ashes of apocrypha, providing the most intimate and richly textured portrait of the famous golfer to date. Although reverential, Dodson doesn't shy away from the darker aspects of the Hogan story, exposing a vulnerable and pathologically obsessive man whose dogged resolve and...


Fundamentals of Hogan
David Leadbetter
0385502109
November 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
In the late 1950s, the great Ben Hogan consolidated his considerable knowledge of the golf swing into a small volume called Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf. Nearly half a century later, it remains the cornerstone of every intrepid hacker's instructional library, and one of the bestselling sports books of all time. But there was always something missing from its pages: photos. As marvelous as artist Anthony Ravielli's accompanying drawings of Hogan were, they weren't the same as seeing the Wee Icemon himself in action.

Surprise! Ravielli modeled those drawings on several rolls of film he took of Hogan, and those photos, recently discovered, are the heart of The Fundamentals of Hogan. For golfers, they are like finding a piece of the true cross; there has never been a more perfect swing than...



Hogan
Curt Sampson
0553061941
June 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
The great Ben Hogan cast a long and complex shadow. A complicated and misunderstood man, he was so consumed with the solitary pursuit of excellence that the camaraderie of his game passed him by. Yet, he was utterly revered--for his consistency, his perseverance, his dedication, his mystery, and his courage. He was the one golfer his fellow golfers held in awe. Curt Sampson does a fine job of hacking through the rough of the Hogan mystique in search of the enigma who held the world at arm's length. His biography of Bantam Ben is as probing as it is solid; it aims for the man, and finds the bottom of the cup.

Review

"A superb and insightful portrait of the most elusive and complex champion in golf history . . . worth every damn cent you're asked to pay for it." ...



Perfect Mile: Three Athletes, One Goal, and Less than Four Minutes to Achieve It
Neal Bascomb
0618562095
April 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The attempt by three men in the 1950s to become the first to run the mile in less than four minutes is a classic 20th-century sports story. Bascomb's excellent account captures all of the human drama and competitive excitement of this legendary racing event. It helps that the story and its characters are so engaging to begin with. The three rivals span the globe: England's Roger Bannister, who combines the rigors of athletic training with the "grueling life of a medical student"; Australia's John Landy, "driven by a demand to push himself to the limit"; and Wes Santee from the U.S., a brilliant strategic runner who became the "victim" of the "[h]ypocrisy and unchecked power" of the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU). Although Bannister broke the record before Landy, Landy soon broke Bannister's record, and the climax...


I Remember Ben Hogan: Personal Recollections and Revelations of Golf's Most Famous Legend from the People Who Knew Him Best
Mike Towle
158182078X
March 2000
Hardcover
·
 
The Joint Forces Journal
More than 100 original stories and keen observations have been offered for this book, making it a golf enthusiast's dream.

Book Description
A beautiful hardcover book and collector's item, "I Remember Ben Hogan" is an oral history of an amazing golf legend. Many people were touched by Ben Hogan although few were truly able to connect with him. To a select few, he was a shy, sly mentor, able and willing to reveal golf-swing secrets with a grip and a rare grin. Author Mike Towle uncovers more than 100 original stories regarding golf's most famous legend.

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Eternal Summer: Palmer, Nicklaus, and Hogan in 1960, Golf's Golden Year
Curt Sampson
0375753680
October 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Sampson ( Texas Golf Legends ) makes a convincing case that 1960 was a watershed for the pro links game. It was the year when the aging Ben Hogan, almost literally on his last legs (he had been badly mangled in an auto crash), was barely hanging on to his past glory; rising star Arnold Palmer was starting to draw the crowds of fans who eventually turned into Arnie's Army; and 20-year-old Jackie Nicklaus was just making his presence known. Even more significant, however, was the increasing interest of major corporations in associating themselves with events on the pro tour and in promising larger and larger purses, a trend that did indeed change the game forever. Photos not seen by PW. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title....


Good Bounces and Bad Lies: The Autobiography of Ben Wright
Ben Wright
0803298544
May 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
You've got to give this to former CBS golf analyst Ben Wright: he can sure tell a story, and the further he shoves his soft-spiked foot into his mouth, the better the stories. His anecdotal autobiography flits back and forth between idolatry and wickedness, and at times his pen has no governor at all. Case in point: Wright idolized Ben Hogan. He even went AWOL from the British army in 1953 "shamelessly, though without a trace of guilt," he admits, because it was the only way he could get off base to see Hogan win the Open at Carnoustie. (It's hard to quarrel with that.) After teeing up several tales that firmly ensconce Hogan on his pedestal, Wright finally veers off this way: "These stories illustrate the kind of perfection, dedication and respect with which Gary McCord"--Wright's fellow CBS analyst, and a pretty funny guy...


Golf's Greatest Eighteen: Today's Top Golf Writers Debate and Rank the Sport's Greatest Champions
David Mackintosh
0071413677
May 2004
Paperback
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SportsIllustrated.com
...a fascinating new book about the modern game's best players. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Jack Nicklaus, June 2003
"This is a wonderful tribute to the finest players from all eras." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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In Search of the Greatest Golf Swing: Chasing the Legend of Mike Austin, the Man Who Launched the World's Longest Drive and Taught Me to Hit Like a Pro
Philip Reed
078671624X
October 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
Ostensibly about retooling his golf swing, Reed's account develops in surprising ways that are incidental to the conventions of the golf instructional. Dreaming of walloping a 300-yard drive, Reed seeks out Mike Austin, a long-ball specialist who, in 1974, set a record for the longest shot in professional tournament competition. Reed concedes that Austin (who was in his early 90s when Reed met him in 2001) seemed to be a man of self-aggrandizing habits: every story about his life was over the top, his every swing tip the greatest discovery ever made. But enough about Austin did check out to convince Reed to relax and enjoy his swing guru's bombastic ways and drill-sergeant delivery. As he adjusts his swing according to the barked instructions delivered by Austin from his Barcalounger, Reed perceives a genuine friendship...


Good Bounces and Bad Lies
Ben Wright
1886947228
August 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
You've got to give this to former CBS golf analyst Ben Wright: he can sure tell a story, and the further he shoves his soft-spiked foot into his mouth, the better the stories. His anecdotal autobiography flits back and forth between idolatry and wickedness, and at times his pen has no governor at all. Case in point: Wright idolized Ben Hogan. He even went AWOL from the British army in 1953 "shamelessly, though without a trace of guilt," he admits, because it was the only way he could get off base to see Hogan win the Open at Carnoustie. (It's hard to quarrel with that.) After teeing up several tales that firmly ensconce Hogan on his pedestal, Wright finally veers off this way: "These stories illustrate the kind of perfection, dedication and respect with which Gary McCord"--Wright's fellow CBS analyst, and a pretty funny guy...

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