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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Joyce
159308031X
August 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Two of Joyce's seminal books, now gathered in one volume. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a largely autobiographical story in which Stephen Dedalus grow into self-awareness and away from old ideas of family, national identity, and religion. Dubliners, Joyce's memorable short stories, is a group portrait of figures drawn from real-life inhabitants of his mother city.


James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity
Neil R. Davison
0521551811
May 1996
Hardcover
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Review
'In this thorough and original study Davison poses fundamental questions: what did Joyce know or believe about the Jews, where did he derive his ideas, and to what use did he put them, especially in Ulysses? ... At every turn this superb study introduces fresh perspectives on an important subject.' James Joyce Literary Supplement
'Unlike previous books on the topic, Davison's book refuses simply to portray Joyce as a 'philo-Semite' who had an unproblematic identification with Jews as fellow marginals ... James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity does show convincingly how, along with Irish Catholocism, Ulysses was saturated with counter-reference to European anti-Semitism and the Jewish diaspora. Joyce's encyclopaedic reading of 'the Jews' has regained its rightful place in the texture and sinew of his...


James Joyce, Vol. 1
Richard Ellmann
0195033817
October 1983
Paperback
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Book Review
Although several biographers have thrown themselves into the breach since this magisterial book first appeared in 1959, none have come close to matching the late Richard Ellmann's achievement. To be fair, Ellmann does have some distinct advantages. For starters, there's his deep mastery of the Irish milieu--demonstrated not only in this volume but in his books on Yeats and Wilde. He's also an admirable stylist himself--graceful, witty, and happily unintimidated by his brilliant subjects. But in addition, Ellmann seems to have an uncanny grasp on Joyce's personality: his reverence for the Irishman's literary accomplishment is always balanced by a kind of bemused affection for his faults. Whether Joyce is putting the finishing touches on Ulysses, falling down drunk in the streets of Trieste, or talking dirty...


James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity
Neil R. Davison
0521636205
Sept 1998
Paperback
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Review
'In this thorough and original study Davison poses fundamental questions: what did Joyce know or believe about the Jews, where did he derive his ideas, and to what use did he put them, especially in Ulysses? ... At every turn this superb study introduces fresh perspectives on an important subject.' James Joyce Literary Supplement
'Unlike previous books on the topic, Davison's book refuses simply to portray Joyce as a 'philo-Semite' who had an unproblematic identification with Jews as fellow marginals ... James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity does show convincingly how, along with Irish Catholocism, Ulysses was saturated with counter-reference to European anti-Semitism and the Jewish diaspora. Joyce's encyclopaedic reading of 'the Jews' has regained its rightful place in the texture and sinew of his...


Lucia Joyce: To Dance in the Wake
Carol Loeb Shloss
0641654502

Hardcover
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Dictionary of Literary Biography
Gale Group
0787646644
Aug 2001
Hardcover
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James Joyce
Brett Foster
0791073823
April 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
The aesthetic eminence of James Joyce's prose fiction is rivaled only by the works of Charles Dickens. Literary greats such as Shakespeare and Dante are viewed as his true precursors. Learn more about Joyce with this text, which includes an extensive biography, literary criticism, a list of works by and about the author, and more. This series is edited by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University; Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Professor of English, New York University Graduate School; preeminent literary critic of our time. The lives of the greatest writers of the world are explored in the new series Bloom’s BioCritiques. In addition to a lengthy biography, each book includes an extensive critical analysis of the writer’s work, as well as critical views by important literary critics...


Delicious Dips
Diane Morgan
0811842207
July 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
What is a dip, exactly? Liquid? Solid? Appetizer? Main course? The answer to all these questions is yes, according to this slim, stylish cookbook devoted to every possible manifestation of dip. Providing easy and satisfying recipes for lunch dips and dessert dips, seafood dips and tofu dips, this is the perfect volume for those who can’t help throwing yet another Super Bowl party or housewarming. Black Bean Salsa with Cilantro and Chiles is spicy and colorful, perfect with a big bowl of nachos, while Goat Cheese, Chive, and Pistachio Spread is smooth and sophisticated, classy on a toasted baguette. Several of the dips would work well as sauces for meat, fish or veggies: Balsamic Roasted Tomato Spread with Garlic Olive Oil is delicious on eggplant, as the author suggests, and Fire-Roasted Corn and Sweet Red...


From the Land of Green Ghosts: A Burmese Odyssey
Pascal Khoo Thwe
0060505230
December 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Khoo Thwe, born in 1967, debuts with a remarkable portrait of his childhood in Phekhon, "the only Catholic town in Burma," among the Padaung people, a subtribe of the Karenni "known for what outsiders call our `giraffe women' because of their necks being elongated by rings." Modernity seeps into Phekhon slowly-only in 1977 did the locals learn, along with news of Elvis's death, that Americans had landed on the moon. The Catholic and animist fables that the author and his 10 siblings live by would be the emblems of a fairy tale life were it not for the violence and economic crises of the dictatorship of General U Ne Win. Khoo Thwe enters Mandalay University during the years when thousands of student activists were killed or imprisoned by the government. A charismatic student organizer, he is forced in 1988 to flee...


The Making of a Writer: The Journals of Gail Godwin, 1961-1963
Gail Godwin
1400064325
January 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Godwin, whose latest novel, Queen of the Underworld (reviewed on p. 33), is appearing at the same time as these journals, has kept an almost daily account of her thoughts and doings for more than 50 years. She offers a remarkable picture of determination and tenacity, amid often crippling self-doubts, as she struggled to launch a literary career. After a brief failed marriage and an abortive stab at journalism in Miami, she set off for Europe, staying briefly in Oslo, Copenhagen and the Canary Islands, before settling for two years in London, in a meaningless (for her) job at the U.S. Travel Service. Everywhere she attracted, and was attracted to, men, and each time her restless spirit, her ambitions as a writer and her unwillingness to be tied down broke up the relationships. Her entries also...


Married to Genius
Jeffrey Meyers
1904915094
April 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Biographer Meyers delves into the married lives of nine novelists-Tolstoy, Shaw, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Mansfield, Lawrence, Hemingway and Fitzgerald-bypassing the daily bric-a-brac of marriage to focus on the artists' intertwined commitments to their spouses and their craft, often drawing parallels between the fiction written and the lives lived. Meyers suggests marriage for his subjects was a "strengthening bond... deeply valuable to an artist engaged in psychic survival and in creating order out of chaos," but it is clear that even the happiest marriages came at a price. Meyers uses the diaries, letters and fiction of his subjects and their peers to cover the legendary aspects of their biographies (Conrad's estrangement, Woolf's mental fragility, Fitzgerald's alcoholism, Hemingway's machismo) in satisfying,...


Pucker Factor 10: Memoir of a U. S. Army Helicopter Pilot in Vietnam
James Joyce
0786415576
April 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
"In 1963…there was no way I could have known, sitting in a classroom on that beautiful campus in Ohio, that by raising my hand I would be going to war in Vietnam and that I would see things, hear things and do things that most people cannot imagine."—James Joyce. The author was drawn into the United States Army through ROTC, and went through training to fly helicopters in combat over Vietnam. His experiences are notable because he flew both Huey "Slicks" and Huey "Gunships": the former on defense as he flew troops into battle, and the latter on offense as he took the battle to the enemy. Through this book, the author relives his experiences flying and fighting, with special attention given to his and other pilots’ day-to-day lives—such as the smoke bombing of Disneyland, the nickname given to a...


Were It Not for Grace: Stories from Women after God's Own Heart
As Told by Leslie Montgomery
1596003839
April 2005
Compact Disc
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From AudioFile
This intelligently read collection of essays about how 12 high-profile women connect with God starts out with the inspiring story of Condoleezza Rice. Based on interviews by the author, the stories of Dr. Rice, Laura Bush, Beth Moore, and nine others are told mainly through extended interview quotes, which are seamlessly blended into lessons that have both secular and religious implications. The splendid writing and exceptional narration let these lives unfold so unpretentiously that they will stir the soul even before the facts of each life are comprehended. Together the stories offer a fully developed picture of how these women became who they are, in their own intimate words and without "high-sell" lessons on the value of faith in God. T.W. © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile,...

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