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John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court
R. Kent Newmyer
0807127019
Jan 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In this comprehensive scholarly study of the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1801 to 1835, Newmyer (Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story) succeeds at "locat[ing] Marshall and his jurisprudence in the broader historical context." Newmyer, a professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, cites three principal sources for Marshall's constitutional thinking: his experience as a Revolutionary soldier, his law career steeped in the common law tradition, and his upbringing among the landowning elite in Virginia. These formative influences, Newmyer contends, created in the fourth chief justice a belief system centered on the primacy of the federal union and respect for property rights. As a judge, Marshall (1755-1835) believed in but did not always practice nonpolitical interpretation of the...


John Marshall: Definer of a Nation
Jean Edward Smith
080505510X
March 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
It's taken for granted today that the Supreme Court has final say on how the Constitution is interpreted, but this principle--hotly debated in the republic's early years -- was established by John Marshall (1755-1835), the fourth Chief Justice. Historian Smith's definitive biography, detailed and lucid, is a model of scholarly writing for the general public. The author claims our admiration for the justice and sparks affection for the man: warm, gregarious, fond of drink, a Federalist with the common touch, a seasoned political infighter who remained on good terms with his opponents.

From Publishers Weekly
The most famous chief justice of the U. S. has been dead for 161 years, but his life and work continue to fascinate legal scholars, political scientists and biographers. Smith,...


John Marshall Harlan
Tinsley E. Yarbrough
0195060903
Jan 1992
Hardcover
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Book Description
When David Souter was nominated by President Bush to the Supreme Court, he cited John Marshall Harlan as his model. It was an interesting choice. Admired by conservatives and deeply respected by his liberal brethren, Harlan was a man, as Justice William Brennan lamented, whose "massive
scholarship" has never been fully recognized. In addition, he was the second Harlan to sit on the Court, following his grandfather--also named John Marshall Harlan. But while his grandfather was an outspoken supporter of reconstruction on a conservative court, the younger Harlan emerged as a critic
of the Warren Court's liberal expansion of civil liberties.
Now, in the first biography of this important but neglected jurist, Tinsley Yarbrough provides a detailed account of Harlan's life, from his privileged childhood to...


The Failure of the Founding Fathers: Jefferson, Marshall, and the Rise of Presidential Democracy
Bruce A. Ackerman
0674018664
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Focusing on the electoral crisis of 1801, Yale constitutional scholar Ackerman advances a bold new interpretation of early American history. The election is noted for the electoral tie between two Republicans, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. Jefferson won, of course, but Ackerman's focus is less on the tie than on the sound Republican thrashing of Federalist John Adams. The fracas, he says, revealed a serious flaw in the framework for presidential elections: it couldn't easily accommodate party politics, which the framers had abhorred. The tempestuous jockeying of 1801, the author says, "marks the birth-agony of the plebiscitarian presidency";that is, having soundly defeated the Federalists, a president claimed for the first time that the people had given him a mandate for broad change. In sketching the...


Reconciliation Road
John Douglas Marshall
0295979496
Apr 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Marshall, a conscientious objector during Vietnam, tells of his quest to salvage the tarnished professional reputation of his grandfather, a prominent military historian. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


What Kind of Nation: Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, and the Epic Struggle to Create a United States
James F. Simon
0684848716
February 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Simon (a former Time editor, now a law professor at NYU) examines the decades of conflict between the states' rights views of Thomas Jefferson and the federalist beliefs of John Marshall. In 1801, at the end of Adams's presidency, Marshall accepted the Supreme Court chief justice's position and Jefferson became the nation's third president. That set the stage for years of competition between the two philosophies of government, especially the two visions of the judiciary, represented by the principal antagonists of Simon's history. Simon deftly explains how Jefferson and Marshall maintained a faeade of civility in their public pronouncements while unleashing blistering mutual vituperation privately. Ultimately, as Simon demonstrates, Marshall prevailed. His technique was subtlety itself. In his opinion in Marbury...


Livin' the Blues
Frank Marshall Davis
0299135004
Dec 1992
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
The memoirs of Frank Marshall Davis (1905-87) offer a fascinating view of early 20th - century America from the perspective of a gifted African American writer. Struggling against the restrictions of racisim, Davis, in his fight for self-esteem, developed a powerful voice as a journalist and a poet. Davis, the journalist, wrote for several major African American newspapers, serving as an advocate for the black voice in both art and society. Davis, the poet, published four volumes of poetry. His love of language and his poetic voice shine through in this creative representation of his life as a blues narrative. Woven into his life story is a vivid portrayal of African American cultural history of the 1930s and 1940s. Using the language of the jazz age, Davis integrates the history of jazz with his own developing...


The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Rule of Law
Charles F. Hobson
0700610316
January 1996
Textbook Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This biography of John Marshall's life and thought revises the revisionism. Early biographies of Marshall (chief justice of the Untied States, 1801-1835) tended to be blindly respectful. Then came the four-volume biography by Albert J. Beveridge that appeared between 1916 and 1919. Beveridge popularized Marshall as an intelligent bumpkin, whose willful ignorance of legal precedent allowed him to practice creative jurisprudence. Hobson believes otherwise. The premise of this book is that Marshall had a masterful understanding of precedent. Hobson makes a convincing case, aided by his editorship, beginning in 1979, of Marshall's papers. (To date, eight volumes of those papers have been published.) Hobson gained additional insight into Marshall's times and thought by serving as editor of James Madison's papers. The...


Livin' the Blues
Frank Marshall Davis
0299135047
Jan 2003
Paperback
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From Library Journal
The memoirs of Frank Marshall Davis (1905-87) offer a fascinating view of early 20th - century America from the perspective of a gifted African American writer. Struggling against the restrictions of racisim, Davis, in his fight for self-esteem, developed a powerful voice as a journalist and a poet. Davis, the journalist, wrote for several major African American newspapers, serving as an advocate for the black voice in both art and society. Davis, the poet, published four volumes of poetry. His love of language and his poetic voice shine through in this creative representation of his life as a blues narrative. Woven into his life story is a vivid portrayal of African American cultural history of the 1930s and 1940s. Using the language of the jazz age, Davis integrates the history of jazz with his own developing...


Man Called Peter: The Story of Peter Marshall
Catherine Marshall
0800793110
December 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Filled with humor, wisdom and loving detail, the powerful story of Peter Marshall's life has touched the hearts and minds of millions of people. It is a book about love‹the love between a dynamic man and his God, and the tender love between a man and the woman he married. It is also the gripping adventure of a poor Scottish immigrant who became chaplain of the United States Senate and one of the most revered men in America. A Man Called Peter became the number-one best-seller when it was published in 1951, and around the world lives were changed by reading of the chaplain's remarkable faith. In the foreword to this book, Peter's son writes, "Even when [Dad's] words were preached 'secondhand'. . . in the movie version of A Man Called Peter, they had an amazing effect on people." Through Peter¹s story and...


John Marshall and International Law
Frances Howell Rudko
0313279322
Oct 1991
Hardcover
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Review
“Practicing attorney Rudko makes extensive use of primary and secondary sources to show that Marshall had significant practical experience in international law for 20 years prior to his appointment as Chief Justice in 1801. Rudko focuses on Marshall's intellectual and political initiation to the law of nations as an attorney in Virginia litigating claims of British creditors, as a US negotiator in France, and briefly as a Federalist Representative and Secretary of State asserting US neutrality. Marshall early demonstrated a commitment to applying legal principles to politically vital issues of national sovereignty. More complete biographies--A.J. Beveridge's The Life of John Marshall (4v., 1916-19) and F.N. Stites's John Marshall, Defender of the Constitution (CH, Apr '81)--provide less detail about these matters than...


Accidental Genius: How John Cassavetes Invented the Independent Film
Marshall Fine
1401352499
January 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
To most film junkies, the late actor and director John Cassavetes (Faces, A Woman Under the Influence) is an independent film icon. To everyone else, he's either the evil husband in Rosemary's Baby or the guy who directed wife Gena Rowlands in Gloria. And that is Fine's motivation: "I wanted to write the book that I longed to read...the one that explained to a mainstream audience why they should know and care about the work of John Cassavetes." The good news is, the book is not an impenetrable academic tome. Rather than engage in esoteric film criticism, Fine gives us a blow-by-blow account of how Cassavetes's fierce will led to the birth of independent film. The director's desire to go against the grain is highlighted throughout, such as when he told higher ups at the Actors Studio: "Screw you. I don't want any...


A Chief Justice's Progress
David Scott Robarge
0313308586
Feb 2000
Hardcover
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Choice
"Robarge has provided a valuable service by recounting John Marshall's biography...a superb job."

Review
“Robarge has provided a valuable service by recounting John Marshall's biography up to the year he became chief justice of the US Supreme Court...Robarge does a superb job.”–Choice
“Working from the premise that a book focusing of John Marhsall's life before his service on the U.S. Supreme Court fills a gap in the voluminous literature on the man and the court he headed, the author has sought to fill this opening...This is a scholar's book in it's writing style, its historiographical context, and its extensive documentation, and, as such, it is a welcome contribution to the literature.”–The Historian
“[a] valuable illumination of...


Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman--and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America
Alan Pell Crawford
0743264673
February 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
Unwise Passions traces the trajectory of aristocrat Nancy Randolph's tempestuous life, beginning with her privileged birth in 1774, continuing through a series of scandals that eventually sent her North, and concluding with her death in 1837. But this engaging, accessible biography also serves as group portrait of the Virginia aristocracy--and of its declining fortunes, as the colonial oligarchy was supplanted by an unrulier democracy. When she was only 18, Nancy was accused of having borne a child to her own sister's husband, Richard Randolph, who then allegedly murdered the newborn. Defended by Revolutionary legend Patrick Henry, Richard and Nancy were acquitted, and she returned to live with him and her sister. But the rumors persisted, and Richard's sudden death in 1796 only made them uglier. Many of the ...


The Gazer Within
Larry Levis
0472097180
Feb 2001
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
This posthumous collection of essays, reviews, and interviews reveals the poet's refreshing and affectionate take on his life and work. The "soiled brims and stained hat bands" of his early years living on a ranch in Fresno, CA, give way to academic life and studies with Donald Justice and Philip Levine; one memoir finds him driving Zbigniew Herbert around in Los Angeles in the early Seventies, and, in an interview, he dwells on "place" and poetic process. The essay "Oaxaca and the Politics of Looking" is not as archly political as the title might suggest. To Levis, writing is the enterprise of an individual working in a social medium that does not need shrill defenses or hyperanalytic insights. His notions of poetry and the poetic self whether dead center or tucked in around the edges are clear and mindful. His...


The Doula Book: How a Trained Labor Companion Can Help You Have a Shorter, Easier, and Healthier Birth
Marshall H. Klaus
0738206091
October 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
World-wide renowned authorities on birthing and bonding, Klaus and Kennell (Bonding) team up once again in this new work, focusing on the role of the doula, a Greek word that means "woman caregiver." Today, the authors explain, doula has come to mean an experienced labor companion who provides parents-to-be with emotional and physical support during labor, delivery and, to some extent, postpartum. The three authors (Phyllis Klaus teaches psychotherapy at the Erikson Institute in California) describe how a doula can help the birthing process, detailing studies that indicate doula-supported births result in a major reduction in the length of labor, a greater than 50% drop in cesarean sections, a decrease in a mother's need for pain medication and fewer feeding problems for babies after birth. Over the past decade,...


John Locke
John Marshall
0521466873
Sept 1994
Paperback
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Review
"John Marshall's sophisticated new intellectual biography, which draws on unpublished manuscripts and relatively neglected works as well as Locke's better known writings, goes a long way toward making sense of this brilliant but complex thinker. Rather than search for a deeper, underlying consistency in Locke's thought, Marshall explores how Locke came to change his mind so dramatically over the course of his life in response to changing political circumstances, new personal contacts, and (perhaps above all) through his own process of intellectual inquiry....This is an impressive book." Tim Harris, Brown University, Journal of Modern History

"...[an] erudite, carefully developed study....this is an important work in the history of social, political, and philosophical thought." Journal of Church and State

"Anyone...



The Faiths of Our Fathers: What America's Founders Really Believed
Alf J. Mapp
0742531155
November 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
In The Faiths of Our Fathers, widely acclaimed historian Alf Mapp, Jr. cuts through the historical uncertainty to accurately portray the religious beliefs of 11 of America's founding fathers, including John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison. Visit our website for sample chapters!


The Papers of John Marshall: Vol. XI: Correspondence,Papers,and Selected Judicial Opinions,April 1827 - December 1830
Charles F. Hobson (Editor)
0807827487
August 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
At the close of 1830 John Marshall (1755-1835) had passed his seventy-fifth year and completed his third decade as chief justice of the United States. The preceding four years had been among the busiest of his long and active life. Between April 1827 and December 1830, Chief Justice Marshall delivered numerous circuit court opinions as well as six Supreme Court opinions that addressed issues of constitutional law. His travels on judicial business regularly took him from his Richmond home to Washington and to Raleigh. Marshall attended a convention on internal improvements in Charlottesville in July 1828, and he served as a delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention in Richmond from October 1829 to mid-January 1830.

Continuing the acclaimed annotated edition of the papers of John Marshall, this volume sheds...



The Correspondence of Alfred Marshall, Economist
John K. Whitaker
0521558867
Feb 1996
Hardcover
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Review
"... Whitaker has produced an exceptional resource not only for Marshall scholars, but for ecnomists and historians generally. We are in his debt." E. Roy Weintraub, Journal of Economic Literature

Book Description
This is the third of a three-volume work constituting a comprehensive, scholarly edition of the correspondence of the English economist, Alfred Marshall (1842 1924), one of the leading figures in the development of economics and the founder of the Cambridge School of Economics. The edition fills a long-standing gap in the history of economic thought with hitherto unpublished material. Students will find it a basic resource for understanding the development of economics and other social sciences in the period since 1870. In particular, it provides much new information about...

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