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Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay
Nancy Milford
0375760814
September 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review's Best of 2001
Fans of Zelda, Nancy Milford's groundbreaking (and bestselling) biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald's tortured wife and muse, have been waiting impatiently since 1970 for Milford's promised follow-up about poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950). It's finally here, and they will not be disappointed. Milford's vivid narrative limns an electric personality with psychological acuity while capturing the freewheeling atmosphere of America in the turbulent years following World War I. After "Renascence" was published (when she was only 20) and she moved to Greenwich Village, Millay was the queen of bohemia, taking lovers with zest and voicing the reckless gaiety of a generation in her famous lyric, "My candle burns at both ends; / It will not last the night; / But, ah, my foes, and, oh, my friends-- / It gives a...


Edna St. Vincent Millay: Selected Poems
Edna St. Vincent Millay
1931082359
July 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
A lively selection by J. D. McClatchy, the distinguished poet, critic, and editor, casts Millay's career in a new light. Here are familiar favorites alongside neglected gems: translations, a verse play, songs from her opera libretto The King's Henchman, and the complete sonnet sequence Fatal Interview.

About the Author
J. D. McClatchy, editor, has written several books of poems and essays. He is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and since 1991 has edited The Yale Review. He also edited The Library of America's Poems and Other Writings by Longfellow (2000).


Bobbed Hair and Bathtub Gin: Writers Running Wild in the Twenties
Marion Meade
0156030594
June 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This light, engaging book spends the years from 1920 to 1930 with Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Dorothy Parker and Edna Ferber. Without directly tying them together by any theme (other than that they were all "blessed with the gift of laughter"), Meade moves easily among the women, bringing to life four very different individuals and the worlds they moved in, although Ferber suffers somewhat from being surrounded by more colorful contemporaries. Parker, appropriately enough, is introduced with the words "[I]t couldn't be worse" (she was being canned by Vanity Fair) while Millay is evoked with the offhand observation, "[S]leeping with the boy from Vanity Fair was probably a bad idea. But Vincent did it anyway." The emphasis is on the personalities and personal lives of the women, but Meade (Dorothy...


What Lips My Lips Have Kissed: The Loves and Love Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay
Daniel Mark Epstein
0805071814
September 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review's Best of 2001
Poet, playwright, and translator Daniel Mark Epstein certainly has the right background to understand and evaluate poet, playwright, and translator Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950)--though Millay didn't write biographies. Readers of Epstein's Sister Aimee and Nat King Cole will recognize the intense personal engagement the author brings to his task. He's not afraid to express an almost physical fascination for his subjects, which is especially appropriate for the flamboyant Millay, who insisted on the right to take as many lovers as she pleased and to write about them in some of the greatest erotic poetry in American verse. Epstein focuses on that poetry, deciphering the affairs that fueled it and elucidating the boldly iconoclastic, almost cynical acceptance of love's fleeting nature that informs it. (Of...


Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay
Nancy Milford
039457589X
September 2001
Textbook Hardcover
·
 
Book Review's Best of 2001
Fans of Zelda, Nancy Milford's groundbreaking (and bestselling) biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald's tortured wife and muse, have been waiting impatiently since 1970 for Milford's promised follow-up about poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950). It's finally here, and they will not be disappointed. Milford's vivid narrative limns an electric personality with psychological acuity while capturing the freewheeling atmosphere of America in the turbulent years following World War I. After "Renascence" was published (when she was only 20) and she moved to Greenwich Village, Millay was the queen of bohemia, taking lovers with zest and voicing the reckless gaiety of a generation in her famous lyric, "My candle burns at both ends; / It will not last the night; / But, ah, my foes, and, oh, my friends-- / It gives a...


Edna St. Vincent Millay
Nancy Milford
8477652171
April 2004
Hardcover
·
 


Edmund Wilson: A Life in Literature
Lewis M. Dabney
0374113122
August 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Dabney, who edited The Sixties, the last volume of Wilson's posthumous journals, brings a deep familiarity with his subject to this critical biography. Wilson (1895–1972) was mid–20th-century America's most influential literary critic, and Dabney meticulously unfolds the circumstances behind the writing of his most significant books while tracing the evolution of Wilson's thought. Wilson was equally skilled at criticism and reportage, and fairly successful at fiction—including the scandalously erotic (for the 1940s) novel Memoirs of Hecate County—and Dabney confidently sorts out these varied writings and their part in Wilson's legacy. Biographical details are generally filtered through the literary perspective, but the life story does get a thorough if sometimes slow rendering. The account...


Bobbed Hair and Bathtub Gin: Writers Running Wild in the Twenties
Marion Meade
0385502427
May 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This light, engaging book spends the years from 1920 to 1930 with Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Dorothy Parker and Edna Ferber. Without directly tying them together by any theme (other than that they were all "blessed with the gift of laughter"), Meade moves easily among the women, bringing to life four very different individuals and the worlds they moved in, although Ferber suffers somewhat from being surrounded by more colorful contemporaries. Parker, appropriately enough, is introduced with the words "[I]t couldn't be worse" (she was being canned by Vanity Fair) while Millay is evoked with the offhand observation, "[S]leeping with the boy from Vanity Fair was probably a bad idea. But Vincent did it anyway." The emphasis is on the personalities and personal lives of the women, but Meade (Dorothy...


Bobbed Hair and Bathtub Gin: Writers Running Wild in the Twenties
Marion Meade
0786128771
December 2004
Audio
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This light, engaging book spends the years from 1920 to 1930 with Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Dorothy Parker and Edna Ferber. Without directly tying them together by any theme (other than that they were all "blessed with the gift of laughter"), Meade moves easily among the women, bringing to life four very different individuals and the worlds they moved in, although Ferber suffers somewhat from being surrounded by more colorful contemporaries. Parker, appropriately enough, is introduced with the words "[I]t couldn't be worse" (she was being canned by Vanity Fair) while Millay is evoked with the offhand observation, "[S]leeping with the boy from Vanity Fair was probably a bad idea. But Vincent did it anyway." The emphasis is on the personalities and personal lives of the women, but Meade (Dorothy...


Bobbed Hair and Bathtub Gin: Writers Running Wild in the Twenties
Marion Meade
0786182989
December 2004
Compact Disc
·
 
From AudioFile
In this extraordinarily intriguing production, beautifully read by Lorna Raver, a certain melancholy underlies the antics and accomplishments of Dorothy Parker, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Zelda Fitzgerald, and Edna Ferber, all talented writers of the 1920s. Raver's sensitivity and insight into four very different artistic women broadens our knowledge and understanding of them. Her lyrical reading of Meade's description of autumn in New York City subtly suggests the early autumn to come in their personal lives and careers as well. Aptly sub-titled "Writers Running Wild in the Twenties," Meade's biography reveals both the commonality and separateness of four driven and sometimes reckless women: their lives, the people they loved, and those who did and did not love them back. L.C. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award ©...

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