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Babe Ruth
Paul Mercer
0760734704
May 2003
Paperback
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Babe Ruth
Wayne Stewart
0313335966
July 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
This brief but readable biography tells the story of the most recognized figure in baseball--Babe Ruth. Besides vividly describing the highlights of Ruth's career, author Wayne Stewart examines the unprecedented impact Ruth had on the nature and future of the game. Ruth's ability to hit the long ball and the flamboyance of his off-field persona infused the game with a new excitement that rescued baseball from the negative effects of the 1919 "Black Sox" scandal. Making extensive use of interviews conducted by the author with members of Ruth's family and with players who knew Ruth, this biography is an engaging exploration of how Ruth helped shape modern baseball.

About the Author
WAYNE STEWART has now written 20 books and countless magazine articles. He was born and raised in...


Big Bam: The Life and Times of Babe Ruth
Leigh Montville
0385514379
May 2, 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
In this day of overamped salaries, statistics, and physiques, it's useful to be reminded of the singular talent and impact Babe Ruth brought to baseball during his career (1914-35). He owned most of the hitting records for decades, including single-season and career home runs--and all this during the "dead ball" era. Even now, the baseball fan can only be awed by what Ruth accomplished, not to mention the adulation he engendered. And if Robert Creamer's highly readable Babe (1974) is still the benchmark biography, Montville (Ted Williams, 2004) brings fresh observations to his subject, one being that Ruth probably suffered from attention-deficit disorder, which accounts for his inexhaustible energy for everything from baseball to food to alcohol to sex, not necessarily in that order. And in his vivid account...


Babe Ruth and the Ice Cream Mess (Ready-to-Read Childhood of Famous Americans Series: Level 2)
Dan Gutman
068985529X
March 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
CRASH! Young George (Babe) Ruth sends his friends' baseball right through a kitchen window. George runs in fear all the way to his father's tavern, where he finds a dollar. That's enough money to buy ice cream for all his friends to make up for the lost ball! So he takes it. Even as a boy Babe Ruth was generous. But sometimes, it got him into big trouble....

Card catalog description
Seven-year-old George "Babe" Ruth, who would grow up to become a baseball legend, steals a dollar from his father's saloon to buy ice cream for his friends.


Girl Who Struck out Babe Ruth
Jean L. Patrick
1575054558
January 2000
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 2-3-Jackie Mitchell always dreamed of being a great baseball pitcher, and at age 17 she signed a contract to play with the Chattanooga Lookouts. Her chance to prove herself came on April 2, 1931, during an Exhibition game against the New York Yankees when she pitched against Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, striking both out before walking Tony Lazzeri. She was then pulled from the game, which the Yankees finally won. Unfortunately, the commissioner of baseball canceled the teen's contract shortly after, claiming that the game was "too tough for women." An author's note and an afterword give additional background information about women in baseball and about Mitchell's career. Realistic, pale colored-pencil sketches break up the text, but don't really add anything to the story. Still, the easy format and...


Babe Ruth Saves Baseball!
Frank Murphy
0375830480
February 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
Gr. 1-3. Grinning broadly as he looms monumentally over everyone in Walz's exuberant cartoons, Babe Ruth cuts a truly heroic figure for Murphy's easy-to-read tribute to the greatest ball player of them all. The author also adds some dimension to the Babe's oft-told tale, suggesting that Ruth's true greatness rests not so much in his statistical totals as in the way that his character and exciting style of play redeemed baseball in the wake of the Black Sox scandal of 1919. It's a cogently made argument--and the lighthearted tone in which Murphy delivers it may make this more appealing than the overheated melodrama of Robert Burleigh's Home Run (1998). A solid hit for the Step into Reading series. John Peters
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to...


Babe Ruth: One of Baseball's Greatest (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)
Guernsey Van Riper
0020421303
October 1986
Paperback
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Card catalog description
A biography of the well-loved baseball personality who set many records and made home runs a common part of the game.


Babe: The Legend Comes to Life
Robert W. Creamer
067176070X
April 1992
Paperback
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From AudioFile
This book does far more than tell the facts and myths of Babe Ruth's life. It chronicles a time when baseball was played only on grass and a western road trip for East Coast teams meant a train ride to St. Louis. Although Tom Parker is probably not a baseball fanÐÐI'm guessing from a few minor pronunciation gaffs and misreadings of statsÐÐhe does a fine job bringing the Babe to life. His tenor voice is well suited for the mostly male cast. His pacing and continuity are good on this long program. P.B.J. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Review
Sports IllustratedThe best biography ever written about an American sports figure.

See all Editorial Reviews


Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig
Jonathan Eig
0743245911
March 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
Lou Gehrig started his professional baseball career at a time when players began to be seen as national celebrities. Though this suited charismatic men such as Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio, Gehrig avoided the spotlight and preferred to speak with his bat. Best known for playing in 2,130 consecutive games as well as his courage in battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a disease that now bears his name), the Iron Horse that emerges from this book is surprisingly naïve and insecure. He would cry in the clubhouse after disappointing performances, was painfully shy around women (much to the amusement of some of his teammates), and particularly devoted to his German-immigrant mother all his life. Even after earning the league MVP award he still feared the Yankees would let him go. Against the advice of Ruth and others, he...


Love Me, Hate Me: Barry Bonds and the Making of an Antihero
Jeff Pearlman
0060797525
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Pearlman, former staff writer with Sports Illustrated and Newsday, delivers a fully realized, if hardly appealing, portrait of baseball slugger Barry Bonds, who has perplexed teammates, fans, and the press for years with sometimes-indifferent play, an almost-joyful cruelty toward seemingly everyone (except kids), and a near-total disregard for the rules of the game, if allegations of his use of performance-enhancing drugs are true. At the same time, Pearlman's Barry Bonds is a man of astonishing talent and, on occasion, humanity. Bonds' career is fully traced here--from his pampered boyhood as the son of another gifted but troubled player (Bobby Bonds) through his successes at Arizona State, through his years as a superstar with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants, including his pursuit of Hank...


Great Moments in Baseball History (Matt Christopher Sports Series for Kids)
Matt Christopher
0316141305
April 1996
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5?The prolific writer of juvenile sports fiction takes a crack at nonfiction. He describes nine dramatic moments from baseball's historical past, featuring the likes of Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Reggie Jackson, and Jim Abbott. These accounts depict the courageous aspects as well as the spectacular, including Dave Dravecky's comeback after cancer surgery, and the hobbled Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run in the 1988 World Series. Christopher tends to drift to his fictional roots as a number of the stories are laced with manufactured feelings, thoughts, and quotes. He also tends to generalize: "As the crowd in Fenway Park watched Ted Williams run off the field for the last time, they told each other, 'There goes the greatest hitter that ever lived.' " While his portrayals of these moments are...

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