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Payne Stewart: The Authorized Biography
Tracey Stewart
0805424792
May 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The problem with most authorized biographies is just that--they're authorized. They praise, adore, defend, excuse, inspire, whitewash, and love their subjects, which, in the end, conspires to keep the reader at a distance. Tracey Stewart's homage to her late husband Payne Stewart does all of that. It rarely allows a closer view than that available from where she witnessed most of his stirring final round victory in the 1999 U.S. Open: on TV.

Which is too bad, because the sartorially splendid golfer was more interesting and complex than that. Despite his deep family and religious convictions--when he played, he wore a bracelet with initials that stood for "What Would Jesus Do?"--he was certainly no saint; his early reputation as a hell-raiser was matched by a palpable whiff of arrogance later on. His...



Payne Stewart Story
Larry Guest
0740722212
March 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
When he died in a bizarre plane crash in 1999, U.S. Open golf champion Payne Stewart became a sports icon. Already famous for his colorful knickers and charming cockiness, Stewart had parlayed his golfing talent into a brilliant career. The tragic timing of his death at the height of his career focused the spotlight on him even more.In The Payne Stewart Story, author Larry Guest covers the golfing great's career, from his start as an unpopular player dubbed "Tinkerbelle" to his standing as one of golf's most respected professionals. For this book, Guest drew on his 20-year friendship with Stewart and more than 100 hours of taped interviews with some 30 people, including Payne's wife, Tracey, and his friend and fellow PGA Tour player Larry Rinker. Full of surprises, the book details Payne's harmonica playing, his...


Payne Stewart the Authorized Biography
Tracey Stewart
0802727670
Sept 2000
Large Print Hardcover
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Book Review
The problem with most authorized biographies is just that--they're authorized. They praise, adore, defend, excuse, inspire, whitewash, and love their subjects, which, in the end, conspires to keep the reader at a distance. Tracey Stewart's homage to her late husband Payne Stewart does all of that. It rarely allows a closer view than that available from where she witnessed most of his stirring final round victory in the 1999 U.S. Open: on TV.

Which is too bad, because the sartorially splendid golfer was more interesting and complex than that. Despite his deep family and religious convictions--when he played, he wore a bracelet with initials that stood for "What Would Jesus Do?"--he was certainly no saint; his early reputation as a hell-raiser was matched by a palpable whiff of arrogance later on. His...



I Remember Payne Stewart: Personal Memories of Golf's Most Dapper Champion by the People Who Knew Him Best
Michael Arkush
1581820828
April 2000
Hardcover
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My First Cousin Once Removed: Money, Madness, and the Family of Robert Lowell
Sarah Payne Payne Stuart
0060930365
October 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
The "first cousin" of this compelling, disconcertingly funny memoir is Robert Lowell--scion of two old New England families (the Winslows, his mother's side, go back even further than the Lowells), widely considered America's greatest poet during the 1960s, anti-Vietnam war activist, and incurable manic depressive. Lowell has been biographied before, notably by Ian Hamilton and Paul Mariani, but no other "life study" contains a particle of the intimacy, fondness, dismay, and above all humor that Sarah Payne Stuart brings to the subject. Stuart places "Bobby" in a loose-knit Winslow family tapestry, and reveals the back of the tapestry: the droll stories about Lowell's icy, chic mother and eccentric, rich Aunt Sarah, who disinherited him when he fathered a child out of wedlock; the excruciating holidays and bizarre Brahmin...


Payne at Pinehurst: A Memorable U.S. Open in the Sandhills of Carolina
Bill Chastain
0312330103
June 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
One year after blowing a sizable, final-round lead to lose the U.S. Open by a single stroke, Payne Stewart made a remarkable comeback in 1999 and won the coveted tournament in memorable fashion on the No. 2 course at Pinehurst Country Club in North Carolina. But only a few months later, Stewart died in a plane crash after his chartered jet inexplicably lost cabin pressure. Chastain (The Steve Spurrier Story) recounts the story of this final victory and the talented golfer who was perhaps more famous for his signature knickers and tam-o'-shanters than his many professional achievements. Along with chapters on Donald Ross, the prolific architect who designed Pinehurst No. 2, and the history of the U.S. Open, Chastain describes the circumstances leading up to the 1999 showdown and follows one unknown club...

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