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The White Tecumseh
Stanley P. Hirshson
0471283290
Aug 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
William T. Sherman was Ulysses S. Grant's staunchest ally in the Union Army; in 1862 he even dissuaded his friend from resigning. This opinionated work on the leader of the merciless March to the Sea takes issue with many previous biographies. According to Stanley Hirshon, Sherman was not a racist (at least, not by 19th-century standards), not a philanderer (though he liked to flirt), and not a bad general (though he lost a lot of battles). The author makes a persuasive case for these contentions in his strongly argued text. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal
Utilizing regimental histories, historian Hirshon offers a sympathetic yet excellent biography of one of the more noted Civil War generals, best remembered for burning Atlanta,...


Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh
Allan W. Eckert
055356174X
February 1993
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Though there are many biographies of the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh (1768-1813), this effort by historical novelist Eckert ( The Frontiersman ) may spark new interest--and controversy--with its "hidden dialogue" technique. After more than 25 years of research, the author felt free to recreate Tecumseh's conversations and thoughts in what proves to be an entertaining blend of fact and fiction. The orator and organizer's life was shaped by his tribe's tragic confrontation with westward-moving whites, who encroached on Native American lands along the Ohio River valley. His long struggle against this dispossession led Tecumseh to create a historic confederacy of tribes, but this crowning achievement was destroyed by his own brother at Tippecanoe in 1811. Eckert's dialogue is clunky, yet his colorful evocation of...


Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War
Charles Bracelen Flood
0374166005
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The lives of Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman are classic underdog stories. Both of these "obscure failures" experienced more disappointment than success prior to the start of the Civil War. By 1861, they had each resigned from the U.S. Army and failed in several civilian pursuits between them, including farming, real estate, retail, and banking. Further, Grant was known as a drunk and Sherman was labeled insane. But once they threw themselves into the war effort, their best traits and talents began to reveal themselves. Even their motives were similar--both men joined the war not to eradicate slavery but to hold the Union together, believing that secession was equal to treason. This dual biography gracefully reveals how the two men grew to be "as brothers," why their partnership proved essential to victory for the...


The White Tecumseh
Stanley P. Hirshson
0471175781
Apr 1997
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
William T. Sherman was Ulysses S. Grant's staunchest ally in the Union Army; in 1862 he even dissuaded his friend from resigning. This opinionated work on the leader of the merciless March to the Sea takes issue with many previous biographies. According to Stanley Hirshon, Sherman was not a racist (at least, not by 19th-century standards), not a philanderer (though he liked to flirt), and not a bad general (though he lost a lot of battles). The author makes a persuasive case for these contentions in his strongly argued text.

From Library Journal
Utilizing regimental histories, historian Hirshon offers a sympathetic yet excellent biography of one of the more noted Civil War generals, best remembered for burning Atlanta, cutting a swath of destruction across Georgia, then creating...


The Frontiersmen (The Winning of America Series), Vol. 1
Allan W. Eckert
0945084919
March 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River, victims of Indians who claimed the vast virgin territory and strove to turn back the growing tide of whites. These frontiersmen are the subjects of Allan Eckert's dramatic history. Against the background of such names as George Rogers Clark, Daniel Boone, Arthur St. Clair, Anthony Wayne, Simon Girty and William Henry Harrison, Eckert has recreated the life of one of...


Memoirs of General W.T. Sherman (Library of America)
William Tecumseh Sherman, Charles Royster (Editor)
0940450658
October 1, 1990
Hardcover
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Book Description
Hailed as a prophet of modern war and condemned as a harbinger of modern barbarism, Sherman is the most controversial general of the Civil War. "War is cruelty, you cannot refine it," he wrote in fury to the Confederate mayor of Atlanta, and his memoir is filled with dozens of such wartime exchanges and a fascinating, eerie account of the famous march through the Carolinas.

From the Publisher
The Library of America is an award-winning, nonprofit program dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as "the most important book-publishing project in the nation's history" (Newsweek), this acclaimed series is restoring America's literary heritage in "the finest-looking, longest-lasting...


Soul of Battle: From Ancient Times to the Present Day, how Three Great Liberators Who Vanquished Tyranny
Victor Davis Hanson
0385720599
April 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
On first glance, The Soul of Battle appears to be three different books: biographies of two well-known generals--Sherman and Patton--and one who is virtually unknown today, the ancient Greek leader Epaminondas. Yet Victor Davis Hanson, a classics professor and author of The Western Way of War, makes a compelling connection between these three men. They were "eccentrics, considered unbalanced or worse by their own superiors" who led democratic armies on missions of freedom. Epaminondas crushed Sparta's military dominance of Greece in a single winter, Sherman delivered a deathblow to the slaveholding South in the U.S. Civil War, and Patton was the general most feared by his Nazi enemies in the Second World War. Hanson disputes the conventional notion that soldiers fight only for their buddies, rather than abstract ideals. He...


GOD GAVE US THIS COUNTRY
Gilbert
0689116322


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From Publishers Weekly
We know him as Tecumseh, the Shawnee chief who organized Indian tribes in the Northwest Ordinance territory for a united effort to halt white encroachment, a heroic figure respected by friend and foe. Gilbert ( Westering Man: The Life of Joseph Walker ) gives a vivid, detailed account of nearly five decades of conflict on the Western frontier, an appalling story of violence. Following the life of Tekamthi, the author attempts to separate fact from folklore; after Tekamthi's death at Tippecanoe, he became a folk hero in the Middle West. Gilbert chronicles the origins of the U.S. Army and its disastrous record against the Indians; he notes that despite defeats, the Americans continued to advance, while the Indians' were Pyrrhic victories, and concludes that Tekamthi's resistance movement probably delayed the...


Sherman's Civil War: Selected Correspondence of William T. Sherman, 1860-1865 (Civil War America)
William T. Sherman, et al
0807824402
April 1999
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Sherman once remarked that his letters were "sought after like hot cakes." With this superb edition of more than 400 letters drawn from the general's vast personal and official correspondence, it is easy to see why. Sherman wrote much and wisely about war though too often hastily and even angrily about politics and society. The letters read like an epistolary novel, showing Sherman as a loving husband and ambitious military man who found his calling in war. Sherman's devotion to the Union echoes throughout, as does his racism and impatience with posturing politicians, bungling officers, intractable civilians, and anyone else he could not control. The letters show how the famous Grant-Sherman friendship formed, how Lincoln rose in esteem among military men, and how military policy shaped emancipation and...


Frontiersmen
Allan W. Eckert
0945084900
March 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River, victims of Indians who claimed the vast virgin territory and strove to turn back the growing tide of whites. These frontiersmen are the subjects of Allan Eckert's dramatic history. Against the background of such names as George Rogers Clark, Daniel Boone, Arthur St. Clair, Anthony Wayne, Simon Girty and William Henry Harrison, Eckert has recreated the life of one of...


Tecumseh and the Quest for Indian Leadership (Library of American Biography)
David Edmunds
0673393364
January 7, 1997
Textbook Binding
·
 


Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War
Written and Read by Charles Bracelen Flood
0060857412
September 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
The lives of Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman are classic underdog stories. Both of these "obscure failures" experienced more disappointment than success prior to the start of the Civil War. By 1861, they had each resigned from the U.S. Army and failed in several civilian pursuits between them, including farming, real estate, retail, and banking. Further, Grant was known as a drunk and Sherman was labeled insane. But once they threw themselves into the war effort, their best traits and talents began to reveal themselves. Even their motives were similar--both men joined the war not to eradicate slavery but to hold the Union together, believing that secession was equal to treason. This dual biography gracefully reveals how the two men grew to be "as brothers," why their partnership proved essential to victory for the...


Sherman: Soldier, Realist, American
B. H. Liddell Hart
0306805073
April 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
A vividly written, thorough work by Britain's celebrated military writer, first published in 1929. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Publisher
12 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.


Memoirs (The Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading Series)
William T. Sherman
0760773688
January 2006
Paperback
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Tecumseh
Susan Bivin Aller
0822506998
January 2004
Library Binding
·
 


Sherman: Merchant of Terror, Advocate of Peace
Charles Edmund Vetter
0882898604
February 1992
Hardcover
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Sherman's March: The First Full-Length Narration of General William T. Sherman's Devastating March Through Georgia and the Carolinas
Burke Davis
0394757637
April 1988
Paperback
·
 
Review
"A well-researched narrative. It captures the mood of the soldiers, and it graphically depicts the suffering that the army inflicted on those unfortunate persons who happened to be in its path."

-- Library Journal

Review
"A well-researched narrative. It captures the mood of the soldiers, and it graphically depicts the suffering that the army inflicted on those unfortunate persons who happened to be in its path."

-- Library Journal

See all Editorial Reviews


Citizen Sherman: : A Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Modern War Studies)
Michael Fellman
0679429662
July 10, 1995
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This is a study of William T. Sherman as a human being rather than a soldier. Fellman, who teaches history at Simon Fraser Univ., in Canada, utilizes Sherman's extensive correspondence to depict a man driven by anger. A frustrating childhood and an unhappy marriage, a foundered career in the pre-Civil War army and a succession of business failures left Sherman a seething cauldron of hostility that he unleashed on the South during the war. Yet Sherman's will kept his emotions in check most of the time. His harrowing of the Confederacy was a means to end a war he wished to be followed by a peace of reconciliation?albeit at the expense of blacks, whom Sherman detested. Postwar fame modified his contentiousness, but only in old age did he mellow significantly. Sherman's life and career highlight the fact that...


Sherman: A Soldier's Life
Lee B. Kennett
0060930748
August 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Resigning after the Mexican War from an army that offered too little scope for his ambitions, William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891) moved restlessly from jobs as banker to lawyer to educator. Returning to the Union uniform in 1861, he stood out from the beginning as a man of action, energy and something more. University of Georgia emeritus historian Kennett (Marching Through Georgia) makes a strong case in this well-balanced analytical biography that Sherman was a narcissistic personality, driven to avert criticism by constantly increasing his level of achievement. Fear that he could not deal with the pressures of independent command in Kentucky drove Sherman in 1861 into a spectacular attack of acute anxiety. Yet his limited performance in the final stages of the Vicksburg campaign and later at Chattanooga,...

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