Book Finder
    
 
> Biographies & Autobiography > Famous People Biographies A-Z > Young Neil Biography
 

Shakey: Neil Young's Biography
James McDonough
0679750967
May 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Cantankerous and secretive, Neil Young has banished authors from his inner sanctum--until now. In Shakey, Jimmy McDonough distills more than 300 interviews (including guarded yet revealing interrogations of Young himself) into the definitive biography: the skyrocket success, willful disasters, health horrors and triumphs, stunning comebacks, and highly colorful scuffles with equally impossible characters like Stephen Stills, David Crosby, and the incompetent yet brilliant musicians of Crazy Horse. Young is not quite the noble soul some thought--he's an astounding control freak. But he is never less than fascinating. "As ruthless as I may seem to be," Young tells McDonough, "you gotta do what ya gotta do. Just like a f-----' vampire. Heh heh heh." --Tim Appelo --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable...


Neil Young Nation
Kevin Chong
1553651162
November 2005
Paperback
·
 
Amazon.ca
While some may be forgiven for assuming that Neil Young Nation is yet another in a crowd of Neil Young biographies, this is neither among those officially sanctioned (Shakey, Don't Be Denied) nor an unauthorized facts-be-damned waste of paper. Never having met with or spoken to the man whose name forms the title (and not wanting to, for fear his role model might be a jerk on such an occasion), Kevin Chong has written a Neil Young book that is less a biography than a memoir: upon turning 29, after spending three years creating a manuscript (for a different book) that no publisher wanted, Chong decided to stop writing fiction, and looked to Neil Young--a man who has succeeded on his own terms--for inspiration on what to do next.

Chong hatched a plan to take a road trip with three friends (Geoff, Dave,...



Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
Neil Howe
0375707190
September 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Building on the concepts they first developed in Generations and 13th Gen, Neil Howe and William Strauss now take on Generation Y, or, as they call them, the Millennials. Unlike their rather distressing portrait of the more reactive Generation X (the 13th Gen), or the negative stereotypes that abound about today's kids, this is all good news. According to Howe and Strauss, this group is poised to become the next great generation, one that will provide a more positive, group-oriented, can-do ethos. Huge in size as well as future impact, they're making a sharp break from Gen-X trends and a direct reversal of boomer youth behavior. Why? Because, as a nation, we've devoted more concern and attention their way than to any generation in, well, generations.

Using their trademark paradigm, which places each generation as part of...



Neil Young
Alexis Petridis
1560252650
May 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Because the subjects of the publisher's "Kill Your Idols" series are "unafraid of experimentation," "hold nothing sacred," and "inspire skepticism of idol-making in their listeners" (for the most part), they are perhaps more magnetic than popular music's traditional gods and goddesses. These anti-idols may not have directly sprung from the pelvis of Elvis, but they are related to the Velvet One. Here, original research is not the point (rabid fans have frayed these musicians' yarns anyway); the authors relied on each performer's standard biography, documentaries, liner notes, and other sources to relate a condensed chronology of career and personal highs and lows. Rather, this is a chance for a "professional" fan (read: a music critic) to express his opinions on the roles that pompousness, vision, and circumstance...


Neil Armstrong: Young Pilot (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)
Montrew Dunham
0689809956
August 1996
Paperback
·
 
Card catalog description
Presents the childhood of the astronaut who became the first man to walk on the moon.


Perfect Mile: Three Athletes, One Goal, and Less than Four Minutes to Achieve It
Neal Bascomb
0618562095
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The attempt by three men in the 1950s to become the first to run the mile in less than four minutes is a classic 20th-century sports story. Bascomb's excellent account captures all of the human drama and competitive excitement of this legendary racing event. It helps that the story and its characters are so engaging to begin with. The three rivals span the globe: England's Roger Bannister, who combines the rigors of athletic training with the "grueling life of a medical student"; Australia's John Landy, "driven by a demand to push himself to the limit"; and Wes Santee from the U.S., a brilliant strategic runner who became the "victim" of the "[h]ypocrisy and unchecked power" of the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU). Although Bannister broke the record before Landy, Landy soon broke Bannister's record, and the climax...


Chance Meeting: Intertwined Lives of American Writers and Artists, 1854-1967
Rachel Cohen
0641686943

Hardcover
·
 


Killing Bono
Neil McCormick
0743482484
October 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The author of this exuberant rock memoir went to school with the members of super-group U2 and stayed friends with Bono (ne Paul Hewson) as he rose from garage-band front-man to rock colossus to world dignitary thanks to his stumping for debt relief for the world's poorest countries. But the book is less about the distant figure of Bono than about McCormick's feverish quest to emulate his success in a series of bands; he spent 10 thrilling, agonizing years on the brink of making it. The result is a funny, jaundiced celebration of rock 'n' roll fantasy and reality, chronicling the music, the debauchery, the search for band mates who can play an instrument, the philistinism of major label A&R reps, the wasted talents of the wannabes they crush, the seething resentment toward those who make it and the...


Windblown World: The Journals of Jack Kerouac 1947-1954
Jack Kerouac
0670033413
October 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Much of Kerouac's reputation rests on his first two novels, and these selections from a series of spiral notebooks into which the fledgling author constantly poured story ideas and private thoughts offer an intimate perspective on those novels' development. Anybody who's ever started a novel will grasp Kerouac's obsession with his daily word count and the periodic frustration and self-doubt. "I know that I should never have been a writer," Kerouac laments at one dark moment; in another, he wonders, "Why doesn't God appear to tell me I'm on the right track?" Historian Brinkley, author most recently of a book on John Kerry (Tour of Duty), addresses this religious devotion in an introduction that effectively establishes the historical context, clarifying, too, just how much time Kerouac really spent refining the...


Pollyanna
Eleanor H. Porter
0140366822
February 1996
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
It would have been easy to gush through this five hanky classic, but Hannah Gordon presents a realistic, yet warm and human, interpretation of each of the various dour and happy characters. Her narrative style reminds me of the late Elizabeth Montgomery of BEWITCHED as she describes the effect a glad orphan girl has on her maiden aunt's vinegary universe. The book is full of tears and laughter, and Gordon evokes them with small catches in her voice, trembling hesitations and sudden babbles of enthusiasm. She doesn't hit a false note anywhere, a master at her craft. D.W. An AUDIOFILE Earphones Award winner. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Midwest Book Review
The unabridged classic story of an orphaned girl who lives...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.