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The Great Depression: 1920-1940 (History SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1411404254
July 2005
Paperback
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Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
Mildred D. Taylor
0140384510
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
In all Mildred D. Taylor's unforgettable novels she recounts "not only the joy of growing up in a large and supportive family, but my own feelings of being faced with segregation and bigotry." Her Newbery Medal-winning Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry tells the story of one African American family, fighting to stay together and strong in the face of brutal racist attacks, illness, poverty, and betrayal in the Deep South of the 1930s. Nine-year-old Cassie Logan, growing up protected by her loving family, has never had reason to suspect that any white person could consider her inferior or wish her harm. But during the course of one devastating year when her community begins to be ripped apart by angry night riders threatening African Americans, she and her three brothers come to understand why the land they own means so...


Helping Your Child Cope with Depression and Suicidal Thoughts (The Jossey-Bass Psychology Series)

0787908444


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Book Description
Support for Parents Whose Children are Depressed Contrary to popular belief, young children do get seriously depressed, and many try to kill themselves. In Helping Your Child Cope with Depression and Suicidal Thoughts the authors, Shamoo and Patros, show parents: how to learn to talk, listen, and communicate effectively with a depressed child; what situations can cause a child or adolescent to wish to commit suicide; what signs to watch for; myths and misinformation about suicide; how to determine the risk of suicide; and How to intervene.

From the Inside Flap
No five-year-old child would try to kill himself, right?Contrary to popular belief, young children do get seriously depressed, and many try to kill themselves. Each day more than one thousand teenagers try to kill...


Why Am I Still Depressed Recognizing and Managing the Ups and Downs of Bipolar II and Soft Bipolar Disorder

0071462376


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Book Description
The only guide written specifically for the millions who suffer from "soft" bipolar disorder. People with "soft" bipolar disorder, also known as Bipolar II, have frequent episodes of depression along with anxiety, irritability, and restless sleep. Why Am I Still Depressed? helps you discover if you or someone you love may have a nonmanic form of bipolar disorder and shows how to work with doctors to safely treat the condition. Dr. Jim Phelps, a psychiatrist who specializes in treating bipolar disorder, examines the advantages and potential hazards of taking antidepressant medications and explores a range of treatment options, including exercise, research-tested psychotherapies, and medication approaches, from principle to practice.

From the Back Cover

Tried...



Bud, Not Buddy
Christopher Paul Curtis
0440413281
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
"It's funny how ideas are, in a lot of ways they're just like seeds. Both of them start real, real small and then... woop, zoop, sloop... before you can say Jack Robinson, they've gone and grown a lot bigger than you ever thought they could." So figures scrappy 10-year-old philosopher Bud--"not Buddy"--Caldwell, an orphan on the run from abusive foster homes and Hoovervilles in 1930s Michigan. And the idea that's planted itself in his head is that Herman E. Calloway, standup-bass player for the Dusky Devastators of the Depression, is his father.

Guided only by a flier for one of Calloway's shows--a small, blue poster that had mysteriously upset his mother shortly before she died--Bud sets off to track down his supposed dad, a man he's never laid eyes on. And, being 10, Bud-not-Buddy gets into all sorts of trouble along...



Morning Has Broken: A Couple's Journey through Depression
Emme Aronson
0451218078
January 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
World-famous model and television personality Emme and her husband, Phillip, had a happy marriage, a healthy baby girl, and a bright future together. Then Phillip was beset by a painful infection-and soon found himself battling the crippling effects of clinical depression. Told in the voices of both Phillip and Emme, this is the true unflinching story of a couple who endured the ravages of a lifethreatening depression together, and emerged stronger and more in love than ever before. It is the story of Phillip, who suffered for years until, through ECT, he found relief. And it is the story of Emme, who put her blossoming career on hold to care for him, supporting him and remaining by his side even during the most difficult times. But most of all, it is a story of hope for those who suffer from clinical depression, as...


The Grapes of Wrath
John Steinbeck
0142000663
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
When The Grapes of Wrath was published in 1939, America, still recovering from the Great Depression, came face to face with itself in a startling, lyrical way. John Steinbeck gathered the country's recent shames and devastations--the Hoovervilles, the desperate, dirty children, the dissolution of kin, the oppressive labor conditions--in the Joad family. Then he set them down on a westward-running road, local dialect and all, for the world to acknowledge. For this marvel of observation and perception, he won the Pulitzer in 1940.

The prize must have come, at least in part, because alongside the poverty and dispossession, Steinbeck chronicled the Joads' refusal, even inability, to let go of their faltering but unmistakable hold on human dignity. Witnessing their degeneration from Oklahoma farmers to a diminished band of...



I DONT WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT: OVERCOMING THE SECRET LEGACY OF MALE DEPRESSION

0684835398


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Book Review
When Terrence Real was studying to be a therapist, he accepted the notion that women suffered depression at rates several times that of men. Now he believes that conventional wisdom is wrong, that there has been a great cultural cover-up of depression in men. Real is convinced of the existence of a mental illness that is passed from fathers to sons in the form of rage, workaholism, distanced relationships from loved ones, and self-destructive behaviors ranging from stupid choices at work and in love to drug and alcohol abuse. Men reading I Don't Want to Talk About It will probably recognize themselves in every chapter, while women will recognize their partners--and, of course, both sexes will see their fathers in a new light.

From Publishers Weekly
Hidden male...


Down Came the Rain: My Journey Through Postpartum Depression
Brooke Shields
1401301894
May 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In 1980, when she was 15, Shields starred in The Blue Lagoon. In the movie, her character accidentally becomes pregnant, and when her son is born, he intuitively finds his way to her breast as Shields looks on with love and contentment. The irony of this scene isn't lost on the grown-up Shields, who not only did not become pregnant accidentally—numerous IVF cycles and a miscarriage preceded the 2003 birth of her daughter—but suffered a devastating aftermath to that birth. "I was in a bizarre state of mind," Shields describes, "experiencing feelings that ranged from embarrassment to stoicism to melancholy to shock, practically at once. I didn't feel at all joyful." Shields assumed she'd bounce back in a few days, after resting from her difficult labor. Instead, her feelings intensified: "This was...


An Unquiet Mind
Kay Redfield Jamison
0679763309
Jan 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
In Touched with Fire, Kay Redfield Jamison, a psychiatrist, turned a mirror on the creativity so often associated with mental illness. In this book she turns that mirror on herself. With breathtaking honesty she tells of her own manic depression, the bitter costs of her illness, and its paradoxical benefits: "There is a particular kind of pain, elation, loneliness and terror involved in this kind of madness.... It will never end, for madness carves its own reality." This is one of the best scientific autobiographies ever written, a combination of clarity, truth, and insight into human character. "We are all, as Byron put it, differently organized," Jamison writes. "We each move within the restraints of our temperament and live up only partially to its possibilities." Jamison's ability to live...


Waking Up: Climbing Through the Darkness
Terry L. Wise, Harold S. Kushner (Foreword)
0934793085
December 2003
Paperback
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(Bernie Siegel, MD, best selling author of Love, Medicine & Miracles)
Waking Up is a brave woman's story which can help those who want to survive.

(Harvard Medical School, Lyn M. Duncan, MD, Professor)
I have recommended Waking Up for the reading list at Harvard Medical School and the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital.

See all Editorial Reviews


Undoing Depression: What Therapy Doesn't Teach You and Medication Can't Give You
Richard O'Connor
0425166791
January 1999
Paperback
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Book Description
...treats depression as a learned behavior that can be unlearned through thinking differently and incorporating coping skills into daily life.


Change Your Brain, Change Your Life: The Breakthrough Program For Conquering Anxiety, Depression, Obsessiveness, Anger, And Impulsiveness
Daniel G. Amen M.D.
0812929985
January 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
In this age of do-it-yourself health care (heck, if the doctor only sees you for 10 minutes each visit, what other options are there?), Change Your Brain, Change Your Life fits in perfectly. Filled with "brain prescriptions" (among them cognitive exercises and nutritional advice) that are geared toward readers who've experienced anxiety, depression, impulsiveness, excessive anger or worry, and obsessive behavior, Change Your Brain, Change Your Life milks the mind-body connection for all it's worth.

Written by a psychiatrist and neuroscientist who has also authored a book on attention deficit disorder, Change Your Brain contains dozens of brain scans of patients with various neurological problems, from caffeine, nicotine, and heroin addiction to manic-depression to epilepsy. These scans, often showing large gaps in...



Healing for Damaged Emotions
David A. Seamands
0896939383
Oct 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
Preface Early in my pastoral experience, I discovered that I was failing to help two groups of people through the regular ministries of the church. Their problems were not being solved by the preaching of the Word, commitment to Christ, the filling of the Spirit, prayer, or the Sacraments. I saw one group being driven into futility and loss of confidence in God's power. While they desperately prayed, their prayers about personal problems didn't seem to be answered. They tried every Christian discipline, but with no result. As they played the same old cracked record of their defeats, the needle would get stuck in repetitive emotional patterns. While they kept up the outward observances of praying and paying and professing, they were going deeper and deeper into disillusionment and despair. I...


Self-Coaching: How to Heal Anxiety and Depression
Joseph J. Luciani
0471387371
January 2001
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Cognitive behavioral therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts and our interpretations of events greatly influence our moods. Therapists teach clients to listen to their negative internal dialogs and to use less depressive "self-talk." Clients may also be given "homework" in the form of relaxation exercises for anxiety or gradual acclimatization to frightening situations. The emphasis is on changing thoughts and actions, not on understanding their origins. Getting Your Life Back and Self-Coaching are both based on this approach. The latter, by clinical psychologist Luciani, advises readers to identify themselves as specific personality types (e.g., "Worrywarts," "Hedgehogs," "Perfectionists") and then gives specific instructions on how to change these thought patterns. The title by Wright and Basco, a...


Feeling Good
David D. Burns
0380810336
Jan 1999
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
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Los Angeles Times
"A book to read and re-read!"

-- Los Angeles Times
"A book to read and re-read!" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Christmas after All: The Great Depression Diary of Minnie Swift, Indianapolis, IN, 1932 (Dear America Series)
Kathryn Lasky
0439219434
November 2001
Hardcover
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Book Review
To 11-year-old Minnie Swift, Christmas, 1932, is not going to be the time of bounty she's used to. Instead, it has become the "Time of the Dwindling." The Great Depression has changed everything: Minnie's father is working fewer and fewer hours, her hungry family eats more and more aspic and "rumor of pork" (high up on the Vomitron, a zero-to-ten scale Minnie and her brother have invented to determine the vileness of their meager dinners), and a tiny orphan girl has joined their family from Heart's Bend, Texas. Minnie finds a worthy outlet in her daily journal, in which she records the sometimes troubling, sometimes exhilarating experiences of one winter month in Indianapolis during the depression. Nothing can subdue Minnie's lively spirit, although the disappearance of her father challenges her sorely.

Kathryn...



The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide: What You and Your Family Need to Know
David J. Miklowitz
1572305258
January 24, 2002
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Hard on the heels of Fuller Torrey and Michael B. Knable's excellent Surviving Manic Depression: A Manual on Bipolar Disorder for Patients, Families and Providers (LJ 1/02) comes another strong title. Both books cover the origins, symptoms, and treatments for bipolar disorder, with emphasis on current medications. The main difference between the two books is that the current title by Miklowitz (psychology, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder) is intended for patients. It spends a good deal of time on issues exclusive to the sufferer how to come to terms with the diagnosis, whom to confide in, and how to recognize one's own mood swings. More concise in its treatment of the issues just mentioned, Torrey and Knable's title is addressed to a more general audience, spends more time reviewing the scientific evidence...


Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness
Joshua Wolf Shenk
0618551166
September 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Abe the Emancipator, argues Washington Monthly contributor Shenk, struggled with persistent clinical depression. The first major bout came in his 20s, and the disease dogged him for the rest of his life. That Lincoln suffered from "melancholy" isn't new. Shenk's innovation is in saying, first, that this knowledge can be illuminated by today's understanding of depression and, second, that our understanding of depression can be illuminated by the knowledge that depression was actually a source of Lincoln's greatness. Lincoln's strategies for dealing with it are worth noting today: at least once, he took a popular pill known as the "blue mass"—essentially mercury—and also once purchased cocaine. Further, Lincoln's famed sense of humor, suggests Shenk, may have been compensatory, and he also took refuge...


The Blue Day Book
Bradley Trevor Greive
0740704818
May 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Blue Day Book is a wonderful collection of amusing, poignant animal photos and inspirational text designed to lift the spirits of anyone who's got the blues. No one who has lips will be able to read it without smiling; it's guaranteed.The fact is, we all have our bad days-they are an intrinsic part of being human. As prescribed by The Blue Day Book in its delightful photo and text messages, the solution is to see each incident in perspective, recognize that our feelings of failure and loss are not unique, acknowledge the absurdities of our existence, and glory in the potential we all have. In less than 100 sentences, The Blue Day Book conveys this message with great compassion and humor. Its vehicle is charming black-and-white photographs of animals that are strangely human and completely free of judgment or...


The Defining Moment : FDR's Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope
Jonathan Alter
0743246004
May 2, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Newsweek senior editor Alter attempts to explore FDR's famous first "hundred days" in office, when the president laid the foundation for national recovery from the Great Depression. Eventually, Alter succeeds in providing a brief consideration of those key months. But exposition dominates: the early chapters recite Roosevelt's biography up until his White House candidacy (the well-known tale of privilege, marriage, adultery and polio). Then Alter chronicles the 1932 election and explores the postelection transition. Only about 130 pages deal with the 100 days commencing March [4], 1933, that the title calls FDR's "defining moment." Alter attaches much weight to a few throwaway phrases in a thrown-away draft of an early presidential speech—one that could, through a particular set of glasses, appear to show...


Essays on the Great Depression
Ben S. Bernanke
0691118205
January 2004
Paperback
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Mark Toma, Financial History Review
Not only is [Bernanke] technically proficient but his ability to place his results in a larger macroeconomic context is unparalleled.

Review
Mark Toma Financial History Review : Not only is [Bernanke] technically proficient but his ability to place his results in a larger macroeconomic context is unparalleled.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Worst Hard Time : The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
Timothy Egan
061834697X
December 14, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Egan tells an extraordinary tale in this visceral account of how America's great, grassy plains turned to dust, and how the ferocious plains winds stirred up an endless series of "black blizzards" that were like a biblical plague: "Dust clouds boiled up, ten thousand feet or more in the sky, and rolled like moving mountains" in what became known as the Dust Bowl. But the plague was man-made, as Egan shows: the plains weren't suited to farming, and plowing up the grass to plant wheat, along with a confluence of economic disaster—the Depression—and natural disaster—eight years of drought—resulted in an ecological and human catastrophe that Egan details with stunning specificity. He grounds his tale in portraits of the people who settled the plains: hardy Americans and...


River Rising
Dorothy Garlock
0446693944
May 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Set in Depression-era Missouri, Garlock's latest novel picks up where The Edge of Town left off, once again presenting the down-home charm and familiar characters that have made her books so popular. April Asbury, a lovely young nurse, has just arrived in town when her car breaks down and she meets Joe Jones, a "natural-born flirt" who offers to help her. April is plucky, pretty and smart, and Joe soon finds himself falling for her, though he struggles to shed his playboy image. Meanwhile, the town doctor, Todd Forbes, wades into troublesome romantic territory when he falls for a woman of color, and Shirley, the wife of the late rapist Ron Poole, goes off the deep end after discovering her husband's sordid history. When a flood wreaks havoc on the town, things come to a head, and many get their comeuppance....


Remembering Garrett: One Family's Battle with a Child's Depression
Gordon H. Smith
0786717629
March 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Oregon Senator Gordon Smith the ’s son, Garrett, battled learning disabilities and clinical depression for most of his life. At the age of twenty-two, while attending the University of Utah, this popular young man took his own life. As parents, Smith and his wife Sharon, who had adopted Garrett as a newborn, were heartbroken. And, as a senator, Smith was forced to question whether he had the strength or even the desire to carry on in politics.

For the first time, Smith candidly retraces his son the ’s life leading up to his suicide. He chronicles the crippling sadness he and his wife faced in the aftermath; and how, with the help of faith and those around him, he not only returned to politics, but became a fearless advocate of suicide prevention. His moving speech on the Senate floor upon the passage...


Manic-Depressive Illness
Frederick K. Goodwin M.D., Kay Redfield Jamison
0195039343
January 15, 1990
Hardcover
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Book Description
National Institute of Mental Health. Major, comprehensive and interpretive review and reference for psychiatrists. DNLM: 1. Bipolar Disorder.

Book Info
National Institute of Mental Health. Major, comprehensive and interpretive review and reference for psychiatrists. DNLM: 1. Bipolar Disorder.


His Bright Light
Danielle Steel
0385334672
Feb 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Like Kurt Cobain, Nick Traina lived for punk rock (his bands made two CDs, Gift Before I Go and 17 Reasons), succumbed to heroin addiction, and died of suicide. His mom, Danielle Steel, takes us through her 19 twister-like years with Nick in a memoir more affecting than her potboiler novels. Like his AWOL addict father, Nick had good looks, bad behavior, and a yen for the feminine. Five days before he died, he phoned a woman he saw in a centerfold and had a new girlfriend by nightfall. But his fun was ever haunted by manic depression. At age 11, he was a bed wetter who ate all the Tylenol and Sudafed in the house. He first considered suicide at 13, as Steel learned by reading his diaries after his death.

There is tension in this story--one doctor told Steel if she could get Nick to live to 30, he'd probably live a normal...



When Bad Things Happen to Good People
Harold S. Kushner
1400034728
August 24, 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
Rarely does a book come along that tackles a perennially difficult human issue with such clarity and intelligence. Harold Kushner, a Jewish rabbi facing his own child's fatal illness, deftly guides us through the inadequacies of the traditional answers to the problem of evil, then provides a uniquely practical and compassionate answer that has appealed to millions of readers across all religious creeds. Remarkable for its intensely relevant real-life examples and its fluid prose, this book cannot go unread by anyone who has ever been troubled by the question, "Why me?" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
When Bad Things Happen to Good People by Harold S. Kushner. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, this book features Rabbi...


Loving Someone With Bipolar Disorder
Julie A. Fast, John D. Preston
1572243422
February 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
Julie Fast and John Preston have written a ground breaking book for couples who want to prevent manic depressive disorder from hijacking their relationship. Fast, a health writer diagnosed with bipolar illness and clinical psychologist Preston are ideal companions. Their innovative ideas will be welcomed by exhausted partners of "bipolar individuals"--whose illness can cause them to alternate between manic and depressed behavior. Once medication has been prescribed, the key is studying the specific ways your partner is effected. This allows couples to develop pro-active strategies for treating and stabilizing mood swings and symptoms, before they develop into full-blown crises. The techniques emphasize prevention, rather than putting out fires. These include understanding the difference between the person and the disease...

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