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Wisdom of Our Fathers: Lessons and Letters from Daughters and Sons
Tim Russert
1400064805
May 23, 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Surprised by the overwhelming and heartfelt reception to Big Russ and Me(2004), Russert follows that memoir of his relationship with his father with a collection of letters he received recounting relationships between fathers and their sons and daughters. Russert, host of NBC's Meet the Press, received 60,000 letters and e-mails from readers with their own touching memories of filial love. Interspersed throughout, Russert recollects moments as a son and as a father, as well as conversations with famous figures, including Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and news reporter Maria Shriver, about their fathers. But the contributors are decidedly ordinary Americans, many with recollections that highlight generational differences of a time when fathers were less than demonstrative. Many recall taciturn fathers...


Up We Grew
Pamela Bone
0522851185
Aug 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
Award-winning journalist Pamela Bone explores how individuals are tempered and transformed by the process of growing up through her own experience as a daughter, sister, and mother. This inspirational look at childhood explores such issues as why some children in difficult circumstances seem blessed with resilience while others struggle to cope with life and whether Australian children are less resilient than they used to be. The author's perspective is augmented by contributions from such prominent Australians as Natasha Stott Despoja, Max Gillies, Mark Latham, Michael Leunig, and Johanna Murray-Smith.


Night
Elie Wiesel
0374500010
January 2006
Paperback
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Amazon.com
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

The New York Times
"A slim volume of terrifying power"

See all Editorial Reviews


The Glass Castle : A Memoir (Alex Awards (Awards))
Jeannette Walls
0743247531
March 1, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
Jeannette Walls's father always called her "Mountain Goat" and there's perhaps no more apt nickname for a girl who navigated a sheer and towering cliff of childhood both daily and stoically. In The Glass Castle, Walls chronicles her upbringing at the hands of eccentric, nomadic parents--Rose Mary, her frustrated-artist mother, and Rex, her brilliant, alcoholic father. To call the elder Walls's childrearing style laissez faire would be putting it mildly. As Rose Mary and Rex, motivated by whims and paranoia, uprooted their kids time and again, the youngsters (Walls, her brother and two sisters) were left largely to their own devices. But while Rex and Rose Mary firmly believed children learned best from their own mistakes, they themselves never seemed to do so, repeating the same disastrous patterns that eventually landed...


Dictionary of Literary Biography 22 American Writers for Children 1900-60
John Cech
0810311461
Oct 1983
Hardcover
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A Child Called "It": One Child's Courage to Survive
Dave Pelzer
1558743669
September 1, 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
David J. Pelzer's mother, Catherine Roerva, was, he writes in this ghastly, fascinating memoir, a devoted den mother to the Cub Scouts in her care, and somewhat nurturant to her children--but not to David, whom she referred to as "an It." This book is a brief, horrifying account of the bizarre tortures she inflicted on him, told from the point of view of the author as a young boy being starved, stabbed, smashed face-first into mirrors, forced to eat the contents of his sibling's diapers and a spoonful of ammonia, and burned over a gas stove by a maniacal, alcoholic mom. Sometimes she claimed he had violated some rule--no walking on the grass at school!--but mostly it was pure sadism. Inexplicably, his father didn't protect him; only an alert schoolteacher saved David. One wants to learn more about his ordeal and its...


Dictionary of Literary Biography 42 American Writers for Children 1900
Glenn E. Estes
0810317206
Oct 1985
Hardcover
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The Glass Castle
Jeannette Walls
074324754X
January 2006
Paperback
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Book Review
Jeannette Walls's father always called her "Mountain Goat" and there's perhaps no more apt nickname for a girl who navigated a sheer and towering cliff of childhood both daily and stoically. In The Glass Castle, Walls chronicles her upbringing at the hands of eccentric, nomadic parents--Rose Mary, her frustrated-artist mother, and Rex, her brilliant, alcoholic father. To call the elder Walls's childrearing style laissez faire would be putting it mildly. As Rose Mary and Rex, motivated by whims and paranoia, uprooted their kids time and again, the youngsters (Walls, her brother and two sisters) were left largely to their own devices. But while Rex and Rose Mary firmly believed children learned best from their own mistakes, they themselves never seemed to do so, repeating the same disastrous patterns that eventually landed...


Secret Daughter : A Mixed-Race Daughter and the Mother Who Gave Her Away
June Cross
067088555X
May 18, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Using her 1997 Emmy Award– winning documentary, Secret Daughter, as inspiration for her memoir of the same name, Cross, a TV producer and journalism professor at Columbia University, narrates her life as the daughter of a white woman and a well-known black vaudevillian (Jimmy Cross) who was handed over to a black couple for rearing. Several elements fight for the center of this memoir: the emotional roller coaster of life spent between her bourgeois adoptive black family in Atlantic City and her Hollywood show business biological mother (who usually introduced her daughter as a niece or having been adopted); her undergraduate difficulties at the Harvard Crimson, "a club of smart-assed white boys and prefeminist women, more butch than liberated"; and life in the '60s ("It was the season of Angela Davis's...


My Life in France
Julia Child
1400043468
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. With Julia Child's death in 2004 at age 91, her grandnephew Prud'homme (The Cell Game) completed this playful memoir of the famous chef's first, formative sojourn in France with her new husband, Paul Child, in 1949. The couple met during WWII in Ceylon, working for the OSS, and soon after moved to Paris, where Paul worked for the U.S. Information Service. Child describes herself as a "rather loud and unserious Californian," 36, six-foot-two and without a word of French, while Paul was 10 years older, an urbane, well-traveled Bostonian. Startled to find the French amenable and the food delicious, Child enrolled at the Cordon Bleu and toiled with increasing zeal under the rigorous tutelage of éminence grise Chef Bugnard. "Jackdaw Julie," as Paul called her, collected every manner of...


Dictionary of Literary Biography 52 American Writersfor Children 1960
Glenn E. Estes
0810317303
Aug 1986
Hardcover
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The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family
Dave Pelzer
1558745157
August 1, 1997
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Following A Child Called It (Health Communications, 1995), which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and appears frequently on high school reading lists, this is the second in a planned trilogy from motivational author and speaker Pelzer. Here he tells his story from the time he left his abusive mother and alcoholic father, through his experiences in five foster homes and juvenile detention, and how he eventually made it into the Air Force. He was a defiant, rebellious boy who, despite his background and personality, managed to endear himself to many guardians, social workers, and teachers. Pelzer writes in an honest, sometimes rambling, style; he is never bitter, and his story will find many sympathetic readers. However, he leaves many questions unanswered (which may appear in the third book), dealing with his...


Dearest Chums and Partners
Hugh T. Keenan
0820314803
Aug 1993
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Between 1890, when the last of his four sons and two daughters moved away from their childhood home in West End, Ga., and his death, Joel Chandler Harris (1848-1908) conducted a voluminous correspondence with his children. Keenan, an English professor at Georgia State, has compiled 280 of these invariably supportive, affectionate and often wise letters. Gossipy, occasionally coy, and laden with domestic minutiae, they trace Harris's growing interest in Roman Catholicism and provide a broad portrait of his Southern life. The portrait, however, is not always a flattering one. Best known as the author of the "Uncle Remus" tales, Harris often used the Uncle Remus dialect when writing to his daughters, and his patronizing comments about "negroes"--"that happy-go-lucky, thoughtless race"--testify to his disturbing...


Children's Voices from the Trail
Rosemary Gudmundson Palmer
0870623133
June 2002
Hardcover
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Color of Water
James McBride
159448192X
February 2006
Paperback
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Enrique's Journey
Sonia Nazario
1400062055
February 21, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Soon to be turned into an HBO dramatic series, Nazario's account of a 17-year-old boy's harrowing attempt to find his mother in America won two Pulitzer Prizes when it first came out in the Los Angeles Times. Greatly expanded with fresh research, the story also makes a gripping book, one that viscerally conveys the experience of illegal immigration from Central America. Enrique's mother, Lourdes, left him in Honduras when he was five years old because she could barely afford to feed him and his sister, much less send them to school. Her plan was to sneak into the United States for a few years, work hard, send and save money, then move back to Honduras to be with her children. But 12 years later, she was still living in the U.S. and wiring money home. That's when Enrique became one of the...


Death from Child Abuse... and No One Heard
Eve Krupinski
0930507045
June 2002
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
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Child Welfare League of America, Inc.
Highly recommended for professionals, parents, and anyone who cares about children.

Kempe Children's Center
Read this book and then get involved...

See all Editorial Reviews


A Man Named Dave: A Story of Triumph and Forgiveness
Dave Pelzer
0452281903
September 1, 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
The third tale in David Pelzer's autobiographical trilogy, A Man Named Dave is an inspiring story of terror, recovery, and hope experienced by the author throughout his life. Known for his work as a child abuse advocate, Pelzer has been commended by several U.S. presidents and international agencies, and his previous memoirs of growing up as an abused child (A Child Called "It" and The Lost Boy) have touched thousands of lives. He provides living proof that we can "stop the cycle" and lead fulfilling, rewarding lives full of healthy relationships. Ultimately triumphant, this book will have you living through the eyes of a terrified child, a struggling young man, and an adult finally forgiving his dying father--reading with tissues nearby is recommended. Ending with a touching conversation between the author and his own son,...


Nathan's Journey
Helen Barclay
0975541706
Dec 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Nathan’s Journey is the story of a young boy’s struggle with autism. At age three when he was first diagnosed, Nathan was unable to communicate. The book traces Nathan’s progress through special needs school to a time when he becomes class president and plays basketball for a local team. Nathan’s Journey was written for school-aged children to help them understand why an autistic sibling or friend is different. Adults will also find the book uplifting and filled with valuable information about helping an autistic child. Over fifty color photographs of Nathan, his family, and his classmates enhance the story.


Laura Ingalls Wilder: A Biography
William T. Anderson
0064461033
May 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
According to PW, this straightforward chronology "simply shadows and underscores" Wilder's tuniversally acclaimed writings. Ages 8-12. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 4-7-- This biography of the quintessential pioneer girl who lived the ``Little House'' stories and later captured them for posterity in her books is substantial in length and content. Like the subject's enduring series, it not only chronicles growing up on the frontier, but also pictures a way of life that has long since vanished. Many more people and events from Wilder's childhood and mature years appear here than in other juvenile accounts. Quotations from her works are woven into the text. Anderson brings credentials to the work, yet falters when discussing...


Let Me Hear Your Voice : A Family's Triumph over Autism
Catherine Maurice
0449906647
July 19, 1994
Paperback
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From Kirkus Reviews
A vivid and uplifting story of how a family pulled not one but two children out of the torments of autism--and into a normal life. Maurice is the pseudonym for a mother of three whose courage and determination overrode the pessimistic prognosis that ``autism is incurable.'' She was already pregnant with her third child when her one-year-old daughter, Anne-Marie, was diagnosed as autistic. Maurice and her husband cast about to find not merely a relief from symptoms but a cure, finally adopting the form of behavior modification found successful in carefully controlled studies by O. Ivar Lovaas, a California-based researcher. The program involved a daily regimen of repetitious training, the resetting of patterns of behavior that had gone awry, and the replacement of sympathy by discipline, interrupting the child's...


My Sad is All Gone a Familys Triumph Over Violent Autism
Thelma Wheatley
0976057603
Oct 2004
Paperback
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Temple Grandin, author of Thinking in Pictures (New York: Doubleday, 1995)
"essential reading for anybody who needs to learn about pharmacological treatments for severe rage in teenagers and adults with autism."

Community Living Mississauga
A powerful compassionate book, offering searing insight into the education of autistic children . . . and into the world of psychiatry.

See all Editorial Reviews


Very Hungry Caterpillar
Eric Carle
0399226907
March 1994
Board Book
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Book Review Reviews
"In the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf." So begins Eric Carle's modern classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. More than 12 million copies of this book have been sold in its original, full-sized edition, and the beloved tale of science and gluttony has been translated into 20 languages. This five-by-four-inch miniature edition is truly tiny, with tiny type, but it is a nice size for small hands to hold and flip through the pictures. Despite its diminished state, the book is complete in every detail, following the ravenous caterpillar's path as he eats his way through one apple (and the pages of the book itself) on Monday, two pears on Tuesday, three plums on Wednesday, and so on, through cherry pie and sausage--until he is really fat and has a stomachache. And no doubt you know what happens next! Kids...


Honoring Our Ancestors: Stories and Pictures by Fourteen Artists
Harriet Rohmer (Editor)
0892391588
April 1999
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 2-6A collection of illustrated essays on the theme of family/ethnic pride. The artists who contributed to the book were asked to name ancestors who influenced their lives. While many of the respondents chose family members, others selected people whom they felt were their spiritual ancestors. The artists discuss who they selected and why, and explain the context of the illustration that they created to honor that person. A biographical sketch with the artists photograph and a photo or representative drawing of the ancestor are also included. The contributors come from a variety of backgrounds, and each has a distinctive style. None of the explanatory text is particularly dramatic or compelling; its the illustrations that provide most of the appeal. The artwork is highly accessible, although most...


Maus : A Survivor's Tale : My Father Bleeds History/Here My Troubles Began/Boxed [BOX SET]
Art Spiegelman
0679748407
October 19, 1993
Paperback
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Book Description
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.

Inside Flap Copy
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.


War Orphan In San Francisco
Phyllis Helene Mattson
0976165600
Jan 2005
Paperback
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Iris Posner, President One Thousand Children
"War Orphan in San Francisco," an important edition to the Holocaust literature as well as the American historical record.

Book Description
In March of 1940, as a result of Hitler’s plans to eradicate Jews, 10-year-old Lizzi left Vienna by joining a small transport of children seeking refuge in America. Two weeks later she began her new life in San Francisco, getting a new name, Phyllis, and having to learn a new language. Her family is scattered on three continents, but linked by letters. This coming-of-age story is told through the letters in a poignant memoir. Phyllis wrote her parents details of her new life as she grew into adolescence and became an American, while they tried to parent her long-distance. During the next six years she...

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