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Growing up Guggenheim: A Personal History of a Family Enterprise
Peter Lawson-Johnston
1932236570
June 2006
Hardcover
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William J. vanden Heuvel, former U.S. Ambassador, European Office of the United Nations
[A] tour de force, an enthralling story told with a directness that combines candor, humor, insight, and reflection.

Review
"Growing up Guggenheim is a tour de force, an enthralling story told with a directness that combines candor, humor, insight and reflection. Peter Lawson-Johnston has proven the brilliant shrewdness that led Harry Guggenheim to pick him, an unheralded cousin, to lead a new generation of an extraordinary family. The author's talent has ennobled the entire clan Guggenheim and has enriched the worlds of art and business with an entrepreneurial energy and commitment that presents a magnificent challenge to those who succeed to his responsibilities." - William J. vanden Heuvel, former U.S....


Like Family
Paula McLain
0316909092
May 2004
Paperback
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Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul: 101 Stories of Changes, Choices and Growing up for Kids (Ages 9-13)
Jack Canfield
1558748008
October 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Inspired by the many readers of Chicken Soup for the Kid's Soul (one of many in the Chicken Soup for the Soul series), the authors decided to reach out to young people at that incredibly confusing, exciting chapter of life, the preteen years. Readers between the ages of 9 and 12 (give or take a year) sometimes felt that the book for kids was too young, while the edition for teens (Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul) was too old. In this warm, supportive anthology of true stories by and about preteens, the very issues that seem so complicated and insurmountable are addressed with intelligence and openness. Divorce, violence, death, friendships, school, family, attitudes, changes, dreams... preteens have a lot to offer and a lot to learn on these subjects. Many of the brief essays, cartoons, quotations, and...


EB
Bert Kemp
0595091091
Mar 2000
Paperback
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Publisher Comments
USA Today: "EB, a third-person memoir is Bert Kemp's evocative coming-of-age story, an honest narrative painting a vivid picture that those who have never set foot in Brooklyn can easily envision." Other positive reviews: NY Daily News, Darien Times. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

EB is a love-song to a time and a place. A wonderful place of neighborhoods and parishes and consistency and constancy; a place of well-used front stoops, second-home candy stores and club-like saloons; a place of time honored values and life-long friendships; a contrarily sophisticated but endearingly innocent place; the biggest small town in America...Brooklyn, NY. At a magical moment in time...the 1940s and '50s."...an evocative coming-of-age...



When I Grow Up
Mercer Mayer
0375826327
June 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Little Critter’s sister dreams about all the wonderful things she’s going to do when she grows up. She imagines being a great ballet dancer, a world-famous doctor, a race-car driver, and more!


A Generation at Risk
Paul R. Amato
0674003985
Sept 2000
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This important and disturbing book by two sociology professors at the University of Nebraska and Pennsylvania State University, respectively, carefully examines how parents' socioeconomic resources, gender roles, and degree of marital happiness affect their children's lives. Like David Popenoe's Life Without Father (LJ 2/1/96), it strikes a resounding note of alarm at recent trends in American family life. The work is based on the results of a finely drawn 15-year study of a nationwide sampling of married couples and their adult offspring. There are no glittering generalizations here; Amato and Booth provide rich contextual detail and easily readable tables as they consider, for example, the effect of maternal employment on daughters' social integration (largely positive). Divorce proneness and marital unhappiness...


Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America
Firoozeh Dumas
0812968379
January 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This lighthearted memoir chronicles the author's move from Iran to America in 1971 at age seven, the antics of her extended family and her eventual marriage to a Frenchman. The best parts will make readers laugh out loud, as when she arrives in Newport Beach, Calif., "a place where one's tan is a legitimate topic of conversation." She is particularly good making gentle fun of her father, who loves Disneyland and once competed on the game show Bowling for Dollars. Many of the book's jokes, though, are groan inducing, as in, "the only culture that my father was interested in was the kind in yogurt." And the book is off-kilter structurally. After beginning with a string of amusing anecdotes from her family's first years stateside, one five-page chapter lurches from seventh grade in California to an ever so brief...


A Generation at Risk
Paul R. Amato
0674292839
Nov 1997
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
This important and disturbing book by two sociology professors at the University of Nebraska and Pennsylvania State University, respectively, carefully examines how parents' socioeconomic resources, gender roles, and degree of marital happiness affect their children's lives. Like David Popenoe's Life Without Father (LJ 2/1/96), it strikes a resounding note of alarm at recent trends in American family life. The work is based on the results of a finely drawn 15-year study of a nationwide sampling of married couples and their adult offspring. There are no glittering generalizations here; Amato and Booth provide rich contextual detail and easily readable tables as they consider, for example, the effect of maternal employment on daughters' social integration (largely positive). Divorce proneness and marital unhappiness...


It's Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel
Jamie Lee Curtis
0060080957
September 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The creative team behind Today I Feel Silly amiably addresses the challenges of being a five-year-old—especially the pesky problem of learning self-control. In the story's wry opening, the narrator observes, "It's hard to be five. I'm little no more. Good old days are gone. 'Bye one, two, three, four." Among the trials he faces are controlling his temper when dealing with his younger brother ("My mind says do one thing, my mouth says another"), avoiding dirt and starting school ("School seems so scary. School seems so strange. I'm only five. My whole world's going to change"). Curtis's singsong verse also focuses on some of the pluses of being five: though his brother is strapped into a stroller, the hero can walk by himself ("It's fun to be five! Big changes are here! My body's my car, and I'm licensed to...


Small Town Memories
Jack Hopple
0759659451
Dec 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
This story of growing up in the 30's and 40's in two Midwestern towns is told with humor, insight and at times, pathos. It is a socially significant account of family life during the Depression and civilian life during WWII.


The Three Questions
Retold by Jon J. Muth
0439199964
April 2002
Hardcover
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Book Review
Nikolai is a boy who believes that if he can find the answers to his three questions, he will always know how to be a good person. His friends--a heron, a monkey, and a dog--try to help, but to no avail, so he asks Leo, the wise old turtle. "When is the best time to do things? Who is the most important one? What is the right thing to do?" Leo doesn't answer directly, but by the end of Nikolai's visit, the boy has discovered the answers himself.

Award-winning illustrator Jon J Muth's lovely watercolors are the most appealing aspect of this book about compassion and living in the moment. The simple Zen-based profundity of the boy's philosophical exploration may escape young readers, but they will enjoy the tale of a child who, in doing good deeds (for a panda and her baby, no less!), finds inner peace. Muth based...



Hite Report on the Family
Shere Hite
0802134513
May 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Hite's latest sex report, based on some 3000 questionnaires completed by children and adults in 16 countries (50% from the U.S.), focuses on the child's developing psychosexual identity and the impact of this process on adulthood. Her guiding theme is that the patriarchal family is outmoded, sexist and authoritarian and suppresses openness between children and parents about the body. Unlike critics who decry a breakdown of the traditional nuclear family, Hite argues that the rise of diverse new family structures signals a democratizing of the family and a growing concern for women's and children's rights. Her respondents' testimonies, organized around specific themes, touch on all manner of taboo subjects (e.g., the link between childhood spankings and adult sadomasochistic fantasies; parents' erotic feelings for...


Where the Red Fern Grows
Wilson Rawls
0440412676
September 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
Author Wilson Rawls spent his boyhood much like the character of this book, Billy Colman, roaming the Ozarks of northeastern Oklahoma with his bluetick hound. A straightforward, shoot-from-the-hip storyteller with a searingly honest voice, Rawls is well-loved for this powerful 1961 classic and the award-winning novel Summer of the Monkeys. In Where the Red Fern Grows, Billy and his precious coonhound pups romp relentlessly through the Ozarks, trying to "tree" the elusive raccoon. In time, the inseparable trio wins the coveted gold cup in the annual coon-hunt contest, captures the wily ghost coon, and bravely fights with a mountain lion. When the victory over the mountain lion turns to tragedy, Billy grieves, but learns the beautiful old Native American legend of the sacred red fern that grows over the graves of...


Never Good Enough
Carol Cannon
0816311455
Mar 1993
Paperback
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Growing Up
Russell Baker
0451168380
January 1992
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
Russell Baker is the 1979 Pulitzer Prize winner for Distinguished Commentary and a columnist for The New York Times. This book traces his youth in the mountains of rural Virginia. When Baker was only five, his father died. His mother, strong-willed and matriarchal, never looked back. After all, she had three children to raise. These were depression years, and Mrs. Baker moved her fledgling family to Baltimore. Baker's mother was determined her children would succeed, and we know her regimen worked for Russell. He did everything from delivering papers to hustling subscriptions for the Saturday Evening Post. As is often the case, early hardships made the man. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From the Publisher
7 1.5-hour cassettes --This text...


Growing Up with the Town
Dorothy Schwieder
0877458049
Feb 2002
Hardcover
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Glenda Riley, Alexander M. Bracken Professor of History at Ball State University and past president of the Western History Association
“Schwieder has combined scholarship and her love of region to produce a truly wonderful book.”

Nancy Tystad Koupal, South Dakota State Historical Society
“Interweaving the story of her family with the history of her hometown, (she)creates a colorful tapestry of small-town life.”

See all Editorial Reviews


No More Diapers for Ducky
Bernette Ford
190541708X
March 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
No more diapers for me! That’s what toddlers will proudly proclaim after they hear this appealing tale of a lovable duck who takes the big step. When Piggy can’t come out to play because he’s busy sitting on the potty, Ducky realizes it’s time to grow up, too. A sweet and subtle story, with two huggable animals that children will embrace.
 
 
Bernette Ford is the author of the forthcoming First Snow, and co-author of Bright Eyes, Brown Skin. Sam Williams has illustrated numerous picture books for children, including Cold Little Duck, Duck, Duck by Lisa Westberg-Peters and Little Red by Sarah Ferguson, The Duchess of York.
 



Meeting the Professor
Alexander Blackburn
0895872943
Oct 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
In Meeting the Professor, Alexander Blackburn tells the story of growing up as the son of William Blackburn, the legendary professor of English at Duke University. Before his death in 1972, William Blackburn formed strong mentor-protégé relationships with such students as William Styron, Reynolds Price, Fred Chappell, and Guy Davenport, to name only a few. Styron would later describe William Blackburn as "unquestionably a glorious teacher." Through Alexander Blackburn's compassionate look at the "presence and influence of the unique and noble figures" of his parents, we also gain insight into his own struggles to become a writer and teacher.

About the Author
Alexander Blackburn received his B.A. from Yale University and his Ph.D. from Cambridge University. He taught...


Family Farm
Kathleetn F. Hupalo
0967162424
Mar 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Kathleeen Fixsen Hupalo's short stories chronicle what it was like growing up female on the Family Farm in the late 1940's, 1950's, and early 1960's. In a well-crafted autobiography, Hupalo invites us to share a time which has vanished in history, as she reaches back to explore social and human issues still with us today.

About the Author
Kathleen Fixsen Hupalo lives in St. Paul, Minnesota, with her family and the family cats. Hupalo left the Family Farm in 1963 when she was awarded a scholarship in journalism from the University of Minnesota. Hupalo became a college drop-out in 1964, but, eventually, returned to the University from which she received a four-year degree in sociology and, later, a law degree. Hupalo loves the movies and live theater. She is an avid Minnesota...


Leo the Late Bloomer
Robert Kraus
006443348X
March 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Antic illustrations add a comic edge to a sweetly reassuring tale about a tiger cub who eventually catches up to his more accomplished animal friends. Ages 4-8. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description

Leo isn't reading, or writing, or drawing, or even speaking, and his father is concerned. But Leo's mother isn't. She knows her son will do all those things, and more, when he's ready. 'Reassuring for other late bloomers, this book is illustrated with beguiling pictures.' -- Saturday Review.

See all Editorial Reviews


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