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Gastronomy Of Italy

1862056625


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From Library Journal
Not quite the Italian Larousse Gastronomique, but a reasonably close contender. There are recipes, culinary and cultural history, techniques and ingredients, important names and places, cooking terms, and more. Cross-referencing is good, and the well-written, authoritative text is heavily illustrated with maps, diagrams, and color photographs. For all subject collections.-- JSCopyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist
In any contest to name America's favorite ethnic food, Italian surely wins hands down. Spaghetti, pizza, and Parmesan cheese are as much yearned for as comfort foods as hamburgers or apple pie. Genuine Italian cooking may be subtler and more refined than most Americans...


The Perfectionist
Rudolph Chelminski
1592401074
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. What could possibly possess a three-star French chef, a master of his difficult trade in a country that reveres cuisine, to commit suicide in 2003, just after wrapping up the daily lunch service? Readers discover the reasons in a book so knowledgeable and breezily entertaining that it's easy to forget, while chuckling or salivating, that it's also something of an elegy to Bernard Loiseau of La Cote d'Or. Chelminski has lived in Paris for more than 30 years as a journalist, covering gastronomy, among other things, and is on schmoozing (and freeloading) terms with almost every chef in France; he first met Loiseau in 1974 when the 23-year-old chef was already winning notice. A high school dropout, Loiseau was an extroverted workaholic, clubby in the kitchen though shy with women, and a bipolar...


Harvest for Hope
Jane Goodall
0446533629
November 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
World-renowned scientist and conservationist Jane Goodall earned her fame by studying chimpanzee feeding habits. But in Harvest for Hope, she scrutinizes human eating behaviors, and the colossal food industries that force-feed some cultures' self-destructive habits for mass consumption. It's an unsustainable lifestyle that Goodall argues must change immediately, beginning--not ironically--at a grassroots level.

Looping personal anecdotes from 40 years of global travels with stories from noble farmer Davids and corporate Goliaths, Goodall methodically builds her case for shopping organic and living modestly. Mustering a tender gumption, she details the vicious cycle of pesticide-ridden and genetically engineered crops which feed the unknowing majority of consumers; and also feed the antibiotic-treated animals...



Molecular Gastronomy
Herve This
023113312X
Jan 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Originally published in France, This's book documents the sensory phenomena of eating and uses basic physics to put to bed many culinary myths. In each short chapter This presents a piece of debatable conventional wisdom-such as whether it is better to make a stock by placing meat in already boiling water, or water before it is boiled-and gives its history, often quoting famous French chefs, before making scientific pronouncements. In the chapter on al dente pasta, for instance, This discusses pasta-making experiments, the science behind cooking it and whether it is better to use oil or butter to prevent it from sticking. Most of the discussions revolve around common practices and phenomenon-chilling wine, why spices are spicy, how to best cool a hot drink-but more than a few are either irrelevant or...


On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen
Harold McGee
0684800012
November 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
A classic tome of gastronomic science and lore, On Food and Cooking delivers an erudite discussion of table ingredients and their interactions with our bodies. Following the historical, literary, scientific and practical treatment of foodstuffs from dairy to meat to vegetables, McGee explains the nature of digestion and hunger before tackling basic ingredient components, cooking methods and utensils. He explains what happens when food spoils, why eggs are so nutritious and how alcohol makes us drunk. As fascinating as it is comprehensive, this is as practical, interesting and necessary for the cook as for the scholar. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Before antioxidants, extra-virgin olive oil and supermarket sushi...


Crave
Ludovic Lefebvre
0060012854
Apr 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Lefebvre, an intense young chef who trained in France before coming to the U.S. to cook at L'Orangerie in L.A., is passionate about the sensual cooking experience. His enthusiasm is infectious, and this volume stands as a convincing argument that cooking can be as exhilarating as surfing (which, he explains, is his second love), awakening the senses and making the cook feel more alive. His recipes, which range from basic to complex, are categorized by sense; there are chapters on sight, touch, smell, hearing and taste. Of course, Lefebvre explains, "there's a lot of crossover... what's the point of creating the most beautiful dish in the world if it has no flavor?" A simple Cream of Broccoli Soup in the sight chapter is an "exercise in preserving the color of vegetables." The smell chapter celebrates all that's...


A Revolution in Eating
James E. McWilliams
0231129920
July 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"[T]he way [colonial] Americans thought about food was integral to the way they thought about politics," McWilliams persuasively argues in this survey of the creation of American cuisine. The Texas State University–San Marcos history professor explores what the colonists ate and why, how that affected their emerging political and cultural values, how their farms and their rights intersected and how "food remained at the core of America's Revolution." At the root of American cuisine, McWilliams finds, is the immeasurable impact of Native American agricultural practices. He explores the effect of the staple crop peculiar to each area of colonial America upon the development of regional foodways, as well as upon their economic and social practices. With remarkable clarity, he delineates the technical aspects...


Insatiable: Tales from a Life of Delicious Excess
Gael Greene
0446576999
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
As the title of her longtime New York magazine column (which ran from 1968 to 2000) suggests, Greene was indeed an "Insatiable Critic" and not just where food was concerned. Her fun memoir spices up the standard chronicle of food supped and wine sipped with breathless descriptions of sexual trysts, travel tales and signature fashions. Greene's sensual appetite was voracious and her affairs as abundant and indulgent as her meals; her more famous lovers included Elvis Presley, Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds. With chapter titles like "Splendor in the Foie Gras" and "Bonfire of the Foodies," the book brims with vivid and gluttonously gossipy prose, though it's occasionally repetitive, especially regarding the recent growth of "foodie" culture. At heart a singular story of Greene's gustatory and personal...


The Unprejudiced Palate
Angelo M. Pellegrini
0812971558
Aug 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
Although he wrote it nearly 60 years ago, Pellegrini's treatise on food and life reads like a contemporary paean to the Italian culinary ideal. It is no surprise that the editor of this series of classic food writings chose Mario Batali to write a new introduction to Pellegrini, for the two share a nearly identical philosophy. Pellegrini immigrated to the U.S. from Italy and became a professor of English. At his Seattle home, he cultivated a garden and spread a gospel of simple, fresh cooking that wowed his academic colleagues. Disdaining the pretensions of the midcentury movement for processed, flavorless foods, Pellegrini was a lonely voice for using game, fresh herbs, home-canned tomatoes, and garden vegetables to create simple sauces for pasta. He relished the organ meats that repelled so many others, but he could not...


Like Water for Chocolate : A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies
Laura Esquivel
038542017X
February 1, 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Each chapter of screenwriter Esquivel's utterly charming interpretation of life in turn-of-the-century Mexico begins with a recipe--not surprisingly, since so much of the action of this exquisite first novel (a bestseller in Mexico) centers around the kitchen, the heart and soul of a traditional Mexican family. The youngest daughter of a well-born rancher, Tita has always known her destiny: to remain single and care for her aging mother. When she falls in love, her mother quickly scotches the liaison and tyrannically dictates that Tita's sister Rosaura must marry the luckless suitor, Pedro, in her place. But Tita has one weapon left--her cooking. Esquivel mischievously appropriates the techniques of magical realism to make Tita's contact with food sensual, instinctual and often explosive. Forced to make the cake...


Dishing: Great Dishes--and Dish--from America's Most Beloved Gossip Columnist
Liz Smith
0743251563
April 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Reading this memoir is like eating an entire bag of potato chips in one sitting: it's crisp, salty and probably bad for you, but what fun! As a follow-up to her bestselling Natural Blonde (2000), the columnist presents food gossip—timeless anecdotes of great meals and great appetites. An intimate of the Burton-Taylor ménage, Smith describes the two of them eating their way across several continents. She tells of fabulous food parties with former Texas governor. Ann Richards and Nora Ephron, two of her dearest friends. She writes whole chapters on foods like C.F.S. (chicken-fried steak), watermelon and eggplant. She writes about cocktails, etiquette and how to organize truly wonderful dinner parties. Homages to the unadorned Texan cooking she grew up on—biscuits, boiled greens, red-eye gravy,...


Slow Food
Carlo Petrini
0231128444
Apr 2003
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Slow Food, a group of 75,000 members that supports recognition of traditional foods and eating patterns (e.g., the family meal), is an important player in today's battle for the palates and stomachs of the world. As "The Official Slow Food Manifesto" states, "Slow Food is an idea that needs plenty of qualified supporters," but to find them, it's going to need more friendly material than this didactic screed. Italian journalist Petrini founded the group in 1989, changing the name of a previous organization from Arcigola to Arcigola Slow Food in response to the opening of a McDonald's in Rome's Piazza di Spagna, a development described in excruciating detail. Petrini's condescending tone ("When you see the word `flavorings' on the package, don't imagine that it always refers to natural substances") isn't helped by...


The Art of Eating: 50th Anniversary Edition
M. F. K. Fisher
0764542613
February 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
A collection of essays by one of America's best known food writers, that are often more autobiographical or historical than anecdotal musings on food preparation and consumption. The book includes culinary advice to World War II housewives plagued by food shortages, portraits of family members and friends (with all their idiosyncrasies) and notes on her studies at the University of Dijon, in France. Through each story she weaves her love of food and passion for cooking, and illustrates that our three basic needs as human beings--love, food and security--are so intermingled that it is difficult to think of one without the others. The book won the 1989 James Beard Cookbook Award. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Nation's Restaurant News, Michael...


American Pie
Pascale Le Draoulec
0060957328
Apr 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
Is there any dish more American than pie? Seeking to determine its unique place in our cultural and culinary life, journalist Pascale Le Draoulec's American Pie: Slices of Life (and Pie) from America's Back Roads chronicles the author's cross-country pie hunt. Her search by car--from San Francisco to New York--uncovers every native pie variety, from Montana huckleberry to Pennsylvania shoofly; it also reveals, perhaps predictably, an America of towns with 60 churches for 2,500 inhabitants and "white-haired women with calloused rolling pin palms," a breed sadly in decline, as is pie making, which takes time we don't seem to have. Still, pie makers like Oklahoma's Leoda Mueller (coconut cream) and Minnesota's Lola Nebel (raspberry pear) are out there, and for many of them fixing pies remains a link to the past, present, and...


One Hundred & One Beautiful Towns in Italy: Food and Wine
Paolo Lazzarin
0847827410
October 6, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
More than any other country in the world, it is Italy that we turn to for gastronomic inspiration. 101 Beautiful Towns of Italy: Food and Wine takes readers along on a one-of-a-kind tour through the tantalizing tastes of Italy's varied landscape to explore hilltop and seaside towns, where the flavors of Italy scent the air, a good meal is considered the highest form of art, and a fine bottle of wine is never hard to come by. In Alba, savor the refined taste of the white truffle accompanied by a hearty glass of Barolo. Head to Parma for a sampling of prosciutto di Parma, and don't forget to pick up a wheel of parmigiano-reggiano. Travel to the hills of Tuscany, where a glass of red Vino Nobile di Montepulciano accompanies your meal of filetto d'anatra con tartufo (truffled duck breast) and to Campania, home of Naples,...


Food, Society, and Environment
Bryan F. Le Beau
0130305669
May 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
This book concerns itself with food and hunger issues, primarily in America, but also as America is located in both history and a broader global system today. It focuses on food consumption and production in relation to history, society (including politics and economics), environmental impacts, and some ethical and social justice issues surrounding food. Chapter topics look at: Food as a Human Value and Problem; The Biological Base: Food, Humans, and Well-Being; Food and History: From Hunter-Gatherers to the Preindustrial West; Food and America: Early Industrial Era Transformation; Food in America and the World 1945-2001: Continuing Transformations; Foodways, Eating and Cuisine in America; Food, Population, and Environment; and Food, Ethics, and Social Justice. For individuals who find food issues...


Eat This Book: A Year of Gluttony & Glory on the Competitive Eating Circuit
Ryan Nerz
0312339682
April 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
With barbecue sauce–soaked tongue planted firmly in cheek, Nerz chronicles his amusing adventures in the perverse, repellent, strangely heroic world of "competitive eating." Having moved beyond county fair pie-eating contests, competitive eating is now a global challenge involving national pride, superstars and, in 2005, $200,000 in prize money. Freelance journalist Nerz falls in with the denizens of this world while covering the Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog–Eating Contest for the Village Voice. There, the diminutive Japanese Takeru Kobayashi overturns years of American dominance by consuming 50 hot dogs and buns in 12 minutes. From the gastronomical excesses of Coney Island, it's a short hop to the sadomasochistic extremes of Japan, where, during the Superman Dash, "Hungry"...


French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew
Peter Mayle
0375705619
April 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Peter Mayle, author of the bestselling A Year in Provence has done it again--but differently. Traveling this time beyond his adopted Provence throughout France, the food and travel writer has produced French Lessons, a celebration of many of that country's gastronomic joys. Whether pursuing La Foire de Fromages, the annual cheese fair at Livarot; a Burgundian marathon offering runners Médoc refreshment; or a village truffle mass that concludes with a heady dégustation of the newly blessed tuber, Mayle takes his readers in hand and shows all. Wide-eyed yet knowing, ever affable but with a touch of mischief, he's an ideal companion, the best possible narrator of his lively food adventures.

Mayle's gastronomic baptism occurs when, as a 19-year-old, he dines for the first time in France. "At the first mouthful...



The Last Days of Haute Cuisine
Patric Kuh
0142000310
Feb 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Snooty waiters, seating by social pedigree, and food copied from the classical French canon--these facts of restaurant life are mostly gone from our modern dining scene. But how did this status-based system, typical of the postwar period, mutate into today's uniquely American fine-dining "experience"--a populist stew of New Californian, ethnic, and domesticated French and Italian cooking? Patric Kuh's The Last Days of Haute Cuisine: America's Culinary Revolution tells all, deftly and with wit. "European gastronomy was about the few," says Kuh, "the American market about the many. When they came together they created a whole new form: the modern American restaurant."

The story begins in 1939 with the arrival in New York of Henri Soulé, maître restaurateur of the city's very luxe Le Pavillon. It proceeds to...



It Must've Have Been Something I Ate: The Return of the Man Who Ate Everything
Jeffrey Steingarten
0375727124
October 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Vogue magazine food writer Steingarten picks up where The Man Who Ate Everything left off, offering foodies a mouthwatering collection of nearly 40 obsessive essays. "Sometimes, I feel like a giant bluefin, my powerful musculature propelling me around the world in search of food," he explains in an essay about toro, the tender tuna belly used in Japanese cuisine. Equal parts travelogue and investigative reporting, Steingarten's writing is funny, fast-paced and clever. Whether re-creating a perfect plate of coq au vin using rooster procured from a live poultry market, braising ribs for his dog or taste-testing espresso in his Manhattan loft cum laboratory ("Right now there are 14 brand new, state-of-the-art, home espresso makers in my house...."), Steingarten proves himself a true gastronome. Of course, his...


Gastronaut
Stefan Gates
0156030977
Apr 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Comedian Gates is an "epicurean desperado," willing to cook and eat anything—at least once. After all, he argues, if we eat 22 tons of food over our lifetimes and use 16% of our waking lives preparing food, shouldn't we try for the occasional "culinary epiphany" by maximizing our "excitement-to-mastication ratio"? A "culinary disaster" is not necessarily a "culinary failure," he reminds readers as he explains how to prepare fish sperm, sweetbreads, head cheese and cow heel. He admits he hasn't (yet) tried some dishes—such as those for Roasted Placenta Loaf, and Quick 'n' Easy Termites—but most have the user-friendly directions that signify a well-tested recipe. The book has no rigid structure, so a chapter on gold-plating food leads to a section on how to recreate a bacchanalian orgy or even the...


The Perfectionist : Life and Death in Haute Cuisine [BARGAIN PRICE]
Rudolph Chelminski
B000BNNLNE
May 19, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. What could possibly possess a three-star French chef, a master of his difficult trade in a country that reveres cuisine, to commit suicide in 2003, just after wrapping up the daily lunch service? Readers discover the reasons in a book so knowledgeable and breezily entertaining that it's easy to forget, while chuckling or salivating, that it's also something of an elegy to Bernard Loiseau of La Cote d'Or. Chelminski has lived in Paris for more than 30 years as a journalist, covering gastronomy, among other things, and is on schmoozing (and freeloading) terms with almost every chef in France; he first met Loiseau in 1974 when the 23-year-old chef was already winning notice. A high school dropout, Loiseau was an extroverted workaholic, clubby in the kitchen though shy with women, and a bipolar...


Horsemen of the Esophagus : Competitive Eating and the Big Fat American Dream
Jason Fagone
0307237389
April 25, 2006
Hardcover
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Review
"Jason Fagone's Horsemen of the Esophagus is an inspired, hilarious and–more than occasionally–frightening look at the uniquely American phenomenon of competitive eating. As the grilled cheeses, the chili, and the oysters disappear down the hatch at a shocking rate, Fagone redefines the phrase fast food and finds in competitive eating a not-entirely-reassuring metaphor for American life. When it's over, you'll want to buy everyone in the book a bottle of Pepto Bismol, and you'll never look at a hot dog the same way again." —Warren St. John, author of Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer

"This is a rapacious, capacious and almost insane tale. I love Jason Fagone for recognizing that eating contests make for excellent drama, and I love him for having the tenacity to explore his...


The Man Who Ate Everything (Vintage)
Jeffrey Steingarten
0375702024
October 27, 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
When Jeffrey Steingarten was made food critic of Vogue in 1989, he began by systematically learning to like all the food he had previously avoided. From clams to Greek food to Indian desserts with the consistency of face cream, Steingarten undertook an extraordinary program of self-inflicted behavior modification to prepare himself for his new career. He describes the experience in this collection's first piece, before setting out on a series of culinary adventures that take him around the world.It's clear that Vogue gave Steingarten carte blanche to write on whatever subjects tickled his taste buds, and the result is a frequently hilarious collection of essays that emphasize good eating over an obsession with health. "Salad, the Silent Killer" is a catalog of the toxins lurking in every bowl of raw vegetables,...

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