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Time-Tested Plants
Pamela J. Harper
0881927465
July 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Harper, a highly respected garden writer whose books are mostly out of print, surveys the plants that thrive in her Virginia garden. In sections on spring, summer, autumn, and winter, she profiles notable plants in categories such as bulbs, vines, grasses and ferns, autumn flowers, berries, and more. She is opinionated in her preferences (nix to buddleia, yes to chartreuse leaves) but informed and discriminating as only a reigning garden expert can be. She abounds with tips and eye-opening ideas, such as training an unruly honeysuckle to be a front-of-the-border small shrub. She also isn't afraid to admit when a certain plant just won't do for her. This book will have most relevance in the Mid-Atlantic region, but a work by a gardener of Harper's stature belongs in sizeable horticultural collections...


Beautiful Madness: One Man's Journey Through Other People's Gardens
James Dodson
0525949356
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Flower fanatics and perfectionist planters will find much to enjoy in Dodson's recounting of his year spent traveling to various gardens around the world. The author, an amateur gardener whose other books are mostly about golf, travels through the eastern U.S., England and Africa, looking at and learning about flowers and plants. Dodson begins and ends his journey at the Philadelphia Flower Show, where he introduces readers to, among others, Linda and Walt Fisher, a retired couple who force bulbs to grow according to a set schedule so they bloom at precisely the right time for the show. Dodson also takes readers to Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's estate, and to his home state of North Carolina, where, in a touching scene, he reconnects with an elderly friend of his late mother. But while Dodson's travels are...


The American Woodland Garden : Capturing the Spirit of the Deciduous Forest
Rick Darke
0881925454
August 15, 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
With a fine book on ornamental grasses to his credit, Darke turns to summoning forth the spirit, beauty, and natural order of a woodland in the gardens he creates in its image. Darke defines a "Forest Aesthetic," bringing intensity and passion to his revelations of seasonal rhythms and the lyric qualities of light occurring in deciduous environments. Decades spent studying a Pennsylvania locale, Red Clay Creek, form the basis of a subsequent chapter in which Darke melds an authentic ecological stance with the desire to create a garden sanctuary. Identifying aesthetic elements in the most subtle of manifestations, from a tiny dormant bud to dramatic silhouettes of fallen tree trunks, Darke shares a reverie on nature and observations of an applicable artistry. As responsible stewards of the land, gardeners can look to...


Outside the Not so Big House: Creating the Landscape of Home
Julie Moir Messervy
1561587346
February 2006
Hardcover
·
 
Review
There are gardening books that tell us what to plant and where. And there are architectural design books that tell us how our homes should look. But never the twain seem to meet. At least not until recently, when the two spaces -- home and garden -- wed harmoniously in the new book, "Outside the Not So Big House" by Sarah Susanka and Julie Moir Messervy.
-- NINA A. KOZIOL, The Chicago Tribune


This beautiful book combines the best qualities of coffee-table attractiveness and excellent advice. It pairs Susanka - author of previous "Not So Big House" books, which emphasize the trend toward smaller homes - and noted landscape and garden designer Julie Moir Messervy. They label their landscaping concept "opening up the relationship of indoors and out," and encourage readers to make the most...


The Abundant Garden : A Celebration of Color, Texture, and Blooms
Barbara J. Denk, Debra Prinzing
1591861624
March 22, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description

An "abundant garden" is one that is effusive, emotional, demonstrative, and unrestrained. ABUNDANT GARDEN identifies nine design aspects of an abundant garden-and shows how each one is used in a specific garden. Each garden is located on Bainbridge Island, Seattle, WA, in the heart of one of America's most highly regarded horticultural "edens." The book takes the reader on a tour with insightful and imaginative photographs and beautifully written text.

Includes brief essays before each garden "journey" that will describe the abundancy concept that the related garden exemplifies.

Includes specific plant recommendations and practical recommendations that will address the needs of gardeners across the country.

About the Author



Second Nature: A Gardener's Education
Michael Pollan
0802140114
August 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This isn't so much a how-to on gardening as a how-to on thinking about gardening. It follows the course of the natural year, from spring through winter, as Pollard, an editor at Harper's , chronicles his growth as a gardener in Connecticut's rocky Housatonic Valley. Starting out as a "child of Thoreau," Pollard soon realized that society's concept of culture as the enemy of nature would get him a bumper crop of weeds and well-fed woodchucks but no vegetables to eat. Far more serviceable materially and philosophically, he now finds, is the metaphor of a garden, where nature and culture form a harmonious whole. Pollard finds ample time for musing on how his own tasks fit in with the overall scheme of existence; thus, there are chapters titled "Compost and Its Moral Imperatives" and "The Idea of a Garden." Although...


Down the Garden Path
Beverley Nichols
0881927104
Feb 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
Bobbie Schwartz Buckeye : Nichols has a wicked sense of humor. I highly recommend this book as a means of relaxing after a hard day and having a good laugh.
Ethel Fried Manchester (CT) Journal Inquirer : You will definitely be reminded of why you garden. No wonder this book has for so many years been one of the world's best-loved and most-quoted gardening books.
Lori D. Kranz Bloomsbury Review : This semiautobiographical story, of Nichols' first bumbling efforts at transforming a neglected property into a garden, was an immediate success and still rings true with amateur gardeners today.

Book Description
Down the Garden Path has stood the test of time as one of the world's best-loved and most-quoted gardening books. Ostensibly an account of the...


Two Gardeners
Emily Herring Wilson
0807085596
Apr 2003
Paperback
·
 
From The New Yorker
In 1958, Katharine S. White, an editor at this magazine and the wife of E. B. White, began writing a gardening column, which appeared intermittently, like lady's slippers, under the heading "Onward and Upward in the Garden," until 1970. The first essay prompted a fan letter from the distinguished Southern gardener Elizabeth Lawrence, who wrote a weekly column for the Charlotte Observer. In more than a hundred and fifty letters, they discussed subjects ranging from bloom times in their respective zones to meetings with cantankerous plantsmen, their burgeoning families, and, as time passed, the vicissitudes of old age. Those unfamiliar with Lawrence will be glad to meet her; for fans of the Whites, to hear once more about doings in North Brooklin, Maine, is akin to a visitation.
Copyright ©...


Around the House and in the Garden: A Memoir of Heartbreak, Healing, and Home Improvement
Dominique Browning
0743226933
April 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
When Browning and her husband of 15 years divorced, she kept the house and garden they had shared in Westchester, but for a long time she was too depressed to care about where she lived. Gradually, she begins to see that working on the house she had neglected and transforming it into a home again is a way to recover from her despondency. In these short, elegant essays, Browning, a former editor-in-chief of House & Garden, muses on the aspects of domestic life that revived her and shows how she healed her heart and her home at the same time. That symbol of doomed love, the master bedroom, for example, she had abandoned. She fills the bathroom with comfortable furniture and flowers and learns to enjoy lounging in the tub while looking out the window at the moon. A garden bench, a fireplace, chairs grouped together...


Talks with Trees; A Plant Psychic's Interviews with Vegetables, Flowers and Trees
Leslie Cabarga (Introduction)
0965762807
October 9, 1997
Hardcover
·
 
NAPRA REVIEW, Spring 1998
"Cabarga remembers a childhood experience of growing an avocado plant that thrived as he talked to it. But it wasn't until many years later that he learned he could hear the plants speaking in the 'still, small voice within.' In this little book he brings to life their voices in all their kindness, humility, wisdom and even humor.Eye-pleasing illustrations: drawings, woodblock prints, watercolors, and photos, in dark green ink on bone white paper add a nice visual touch to a charming work."

The GROWING EDGE Magazine, August 1998
"Have you ever wondered what a tree would say if it could speak? Plant psychic Leslie Cabarga tells us what plants do have to say in Talks with Trees. It may sound funny, but plants' needs are real.the insights they offer is amazing. A Red...


Diary of a Compost Hotline Operator
Spring Gillard
0865714924
Nov 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
What do you do with Doggy-Doo? Can I put corks in my compost bin? Do worms have lungs? Why is my compost full of thousands of tiny white flies? Vital questions such as these are the lot of a Compost Hotline Operator, as Spring Gillard knows only too well. That really is her job description, and she fields calls like this all day long. She also meets a cast of characters curiously crazed by the gardening bug, like Ellen, who wears worm earrings and belts out the "Compost Rap" to unsuspecting participants in her vermicomposting class. Or Laurel, worm bin mural artist, West Coast Wes the Scarecrow, Scissor-happy Sally, and Mike their fearless leader, prone to tai-chi fits . . .The Diary of a Compost Hotline Operator began in 1996 as a series of entries on the website of City Farmer, Vancouver's nonprofit urban agriculture...


The City of Falling Angels
John Berendt
1594200580
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Past Midnight: John Berendt on the Mysteries of Venice

Just as John Berendt's first book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, was settling into its remarkable four-year run on The New York Times bestseller list, he discovered a new city whose local mysteries and traditions were more than a match for Savannah, whose hothouse eccentricities he had celebrated in the first book. The new city was Venice, and he spent much of the last decade wandering through its canals and palazzos, seeking to understand a place that any native will tell you is easy to visit but hard to know. For travelers to Venice, whether by armchair or vaporetto, he has selected his 10 (actually 11) Books to Read on Venice. And he took the time to answer a few of our questions about his charming new book, The City of Falling Angels:...



The Earth Knows My Name : Food, Memory, and Justice in the Gardens of Ethnic America
Patricia Klindienst
0807085626
April 15, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Though Klindienst imposes a strong philosophical structure on the narratives in this poetic collection, her political interpretations come second to the beauty and humor in what is essentially a set of portraits of both American gardens and gardeners. Woven into these stories are wide-ranging details of agricultural history: how to make blue corn piki bread, how the injustice of post-emancipation land sales affected one farmer, the fragrance of the sweet-sticky-pumpkin flower brought by refugees from Cambodia. Klindienst's writing shines when recounting her conversations with farmers, but her analysis of "hunger for community" and how a "garden can be a powerful expression of resistance" feels awkward. Luckily, between the prologue and the epilogue, Klindienst provides an unpretentious and touching tour of the...


The Secret Garden
Frances Hodgson Burnett
0397321651
April 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Mistress Mary is quite contrary until she helps her garden grow. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen little peas in a pod, closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations and puts the blush of a wild rose in their cheeks; "It was the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place any one could imagine. The high walls which shut it in were covered with the leafless stems of roses which were so thick, that they matted together.... 'No wonder it is still,' Mary whispered. 'I am the first person who has spoken here for ten years.'" As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. For anyone who has ever felt afraid to live and love, The...


Words for Gardeners to Live by
Mary Engelbreit
0740735187
Apr 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Every day, we are fortunate to witness God's wondrous creation... whether it's a bluebird singing in a tree on a warm summer day, a bouquet of fresh cut flowers standing tall in a vase, or newly picked green beans from a garden. In the fifth book in the Words To Live By series, Mary Engelbreit illustrates for us the beauty of the world that we live in - the world that gardeners embrace with such enthusiasm - with her charming, detailed artwork and heartwarming verse. Flowers, gardens - the simplicity of nature itself - provides for us a sense of peace, security, and beauty,, and even strengthens our belief in God when we take a moment to stop and appreciate our incredible world. The miraculous sight of a red rose blooming, or tiny seeds developing into a garden full of vegetables - even a bird hatching from a tiny...


The Jewel Box Garden
Thomas Hobbs
0881926469
April 15, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
Hobbs, Southlands Nursery owner and plantsman extraordinaire, reigns over Vancouver's horticultural scene and exerts an indubitable presence throughout the Pacific Northwest and points beyond. His passion for daringly vibrant plant pairings blazed brightly in his first book, Shocking Beauty (1999). Now, in a brilliantly produced and gorgeously illustrated new tome, Hobbs holds forth on myriad ideas about garden design. From ornamentation and hardscaping to maximizing small spaces and issues of scale, Hobbs integrates practical observations and advice into an inspirational nexus, laying claim, in effect, to the role of a piper, calling upon gardeners to follow their dreams and tap into creative urges. Along with a message to dream big, green thumbs are encouraged to key in to their beloved plants to glean...


Clippings from Orene's Garden
Orene Horton
1929175353
Mar 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Rowland Alston, Host, "Making It Grow"
Orene’s writings are accurate and timely. Her artistic skills transform the science of gardening into the joy of gardening.

Linda Askey, Former Garden Editor, Southern Living magazine
Orene planted, lectured, toured, taught, and assisted others to find the same joy she found in her personal Eden.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Glory of Gardens: 2,000 Years of Writings on Garden Design
Scott J. Tilden (Editor)
0810955415
April 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
Figures from history emerge alongside modern-day gardening mavens in a treasury of opinionated essays and philosophizing commentary that covers every aspect of garden design. Editor Tilden achieves great scope by giving voice to 2,000 years of musings on garden design by Chinese emperors, Roman poets, and influential, avant-garde landscape architects, writings usefully organized by topic, be it site or structure, plant selection or color. Beautiful photographs illustrate this fascinating trove of writings wonderfully representative of how great minds view the natural world, and how gardeners attempt to shape either private sanctuaries or public domains for sensory pleasure or spiritual sustenance. Aesthetic principles and practical problems have provided food for thought for eons, as witnessed by the book's cultural...


Plant This: Best Bets for Year-Round Gorgeous Gardens
Ketzel Levine, Rene Eisenbart (Illustrator)
1570612455
September 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Ketzel Levine is known nation-wide as the Doyenne of Dirt, thanks to her regular gardening chats with the horticulturally challenged Scott Simon on NPR's Weekend Edition. Plant This! is a collection of Levine's 100 best recommendations, drawn from her weekly plant profile columns in the Portland (Oregon) Oregonian. Like many a gardening tome, Levine's covers perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees. But unlike the prose in most other gardening references, her writing is more than engaging--it's fun. Sure, she tells you the botanical name for each of the plants, but she also explains how to pronounce it (so Arisaema sounds like "Pasadena," and Enkianthus sounds like "send me Kansas"). She also lists the basic needs for each (for jack-in-the-pulpit, this includes part shade, humus-rich soil, good drainage, and human blood) plus...


Garden Whimsy
Tovah Martin
0395937310
Nov 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
There is no question that gardening inspires creativity and playfulness. A full measure of both is captured in this book on garden accessories. Giant bronze frogs standing erect and playing the sax and cello, sunflowers sporting hats, fence posts sprouting gloves, and a bench with undulating serpent arms are just a few of the compelling images captured in the many color photographs.

Gardeners tend to be eccentrics, and it looks as if the gardeners in this book have fully indulged their visions, making the very best kinds of personal gardens. While many of the ideas are large and expensive, such as Italian stone follies carved into huge mask faces topped with bridges, or gazing balls eight feet in diameter, many more are simple and easy to emulate. Many of the lightest touches are created with paint or found...



The Secret Garden
Frances Hodgson Burnett
006440188X
April 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Mistress Mary is quite contrary until she helps her garden grow. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen little peas in a pod, closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations and puts the blush of a wild rose in their cheeks; "It was the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place any one could imagine. The high walls which shut it in were covered with the leafless stems of roses which were so thick, that they matted together.... 'No wonder it is still,' Mary whispered. 'I am the first person who has spoken here for ten years.'" As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. For anyone who has ever felt afraid to live and love, The...


Of Women and Horses
GaWaNi Pony Boy (Commentary)
1889540528
May 2000
Hardcover
·
 
ForeWord Magazine
It seems that almost all little girls in North America love horses and many women have a palpable affection.

Book Description
GaWaNi Pony Boy gathers an impressive array of known and unknown horsewomen, who in touching prose describe the unique relationships they have with their horses.


Everything I Know I Learned in My Garden
Emilie Barnes
0736910018
Jan 2003
Hardcover
·
 


Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots through Gardening
Fran Sorin
0446694029
March 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Garden designer Sorin invites readers to "unearth" their "creative roots" in a book long on platitudes and cheerful encouragement but unfortunately lacking in advice that would-be gardeners can put to real use. In the introduction ("what does it mean to be creative?"), Sorin sets the book’s tone by explaining that her "mission is not to have everyone create world-class gardens, but…to show new and experienced gardeners alike how they can use their gardens…as tools for their creative awakening." Accordingly, she organizes her book into "seven stages of creative unfolding": Imagining, Envisioning, Planning, Planting, Tending, Enjoying and Completing. These are sensible divisions, certainly, but the exercises that Sorin provides offers within are not always inspiring (e.g., "Ask yourself: What would I...


Garden Open Tomorrow
Beverley Nichols
0881925527
Aug 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book News, October 3, 2002
"Contains all the wit and humor of his previous books, [and] several excruciatingly funny passages about cats and society personages."

Review
Marilis Hornidge Rockland Courier-Gazette : [Nichols] is someone whose company anyone would enjoy, whose wit is charming, and whose story-telling abilities area marvel.
SciTech Book News : Contains all the wit and humor of his previous books, with the addition of several excruciatingly funny passages about cats and society personages.
Pam Beck Raleigh News and Observer : [A] modern English gardening classic . . . . Delightful.
Joanne S. Carpender National Gardener : [Nichols's] practical garden tips are spiced with his delightful sense of humor and strong opinions on...


The Secret Garden (Unabridged Classics Series)
Frances Hodgson Burnett
1402714599
September 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
The illustrations for this series were created by Scott McKowen, who, with his wife Christina Poddubiuk, operates Punch & Judy Inc., a company specializing in design and illustration for theater and performing arts. Their projects often involve research into the visual aspects of historical settings and characters. Christina is a theater set and costume designer and contributed advice on the period clothing for the illustrations.

Scott created these drawings in scratchboard ­ an engraving medium which evokes the look of popular art from the period of these stories. Scratchboard is an illustration board with a specifically prepared surface of hard white chalk. A thin layer of black ink is rolled over the surface, and lines are drawn by hand with a sharp knife by scraping through the ink layer to expose...

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