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At Home in Mitford
Jan Karon
014025448X
February 1996
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Father Tim, a cherished small-town rector, is the steadfast soldier in this beloved slice of life story set in an American village where the grass is still green, the pickets are still white, and the air still smells sweet. The rector's forthright secretary, Emma Garret, worries about her employer, as she sees past his Christian cheerfulness into his aching loneliness. Slowly but surely, the empty places in Father Tim's heart do get filled. First with a gangly stray dog, later with a seemingly stray boy, and finally with the realization that he is stumbling into love with his independent and Christian-wise next-door neighbor. Much more than a gentle love story, this is a homespun tale about a town of endearing characters-- including a mysterious jewel thief--who are as quirky and popular as those of Mayberry, R.F.D. ...


The Egg and I
Betty MacDonald
0060914289
September 16, 1987
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Reissue of this immortal, hilarious, and heartwarming classic about working a chicken farm in the Northwest.

Card catalog description
The author relates the joys and frustrations of life on a poultry farm in the mountains of Washington.

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Milk Glass Moon: A Big Stone Gap Novel (Ballantine Reader's Circle Series)
Adriana Trigiani
0345445856
July 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The third book in Trigiani's series about the middle-aged but young-at-heart Ave Maria of Big Stone Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains is simply made for the ear. The author colorfully and flawlessly captures the characters' southern and Italian accents, transporting listeners into Ave Maria's charmed world. She's a pharmacist in a small Virginia town but has relatives in Italy; and her daughter Etta has just entered her teen years, causing Ave Maria much heartache and uncertainty. She's torn between wanting Etta to mature and wishing Etta was much younger. She cheerfully discusses affairs from the daily chatter at the drugstore counter to more serious matters, such as the death of her son years earlier and her best friend Iva Lou's breast cancer. The dialogue is always snappy (e.g., after Ave Maria has seen a man...


Why Animals Sleep So Close to the Road (and Other Lies I Tell My Children)
Susan Konig
031233236X
May 1, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"Sure, sure, it's important to tell your kids the truth. Except when it's better to flat out lie," writes Konig, a former columnist for the New York Post, in her witty first book about the realities of being a modern-day mother. Filled with warm family anecdotes and belly laughs, the book deals with such universal subjects as living in cramped quarters, dealing with the demise of beloved pets (or unwanted roadside varmints) and overcoming the perils of house hunting, pregnancy and childbirth, to name a few. But the book's primary focus is on the struggle of balancing family life with working at home. (Readers will identify with Konig when she describes having to hide all the pens in her house from her son, who likes to write on furniture, and then not being able to find a pen when she needs one.) Despite its...


Prodigal Summer
Barbara Kingsolver
0060959037
October 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
There is no one in contemporary literature quite like Barbara Kingsolver. Her dialogue sparkles with sassy wit and earthy poetry; her descriptions are rooted in daily life but are also on familiar terms with the eternal. With Prodigal Summer, she returns from the Congo to a "wrinkle on the map that lies between farms and wildness." And there, in an isolated pocket of southern Appalachia, she recounts not one but three intricate stories.

Exuberant, lush, riotous--the summer of the novel is "the season of extravagant procreation" in which bullfrogs carelessly lay their jellied masses of eggs in the grass, "apparently confident that their tadpoles would be able to swim through the lawn like little sperms," and in which a woman may learn to "tell time with her skin." It is also the summer in which a family of...



Bob Artley's Country School Days: From The Memories Of A Former Kid
Bob Atrley
076032462X
March 27, 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
With fond reminiscences and nostalgic cartoons, Bob Artley takes readers back to his little country schoolhouse, Marion No. 7, in Iowa's Franklin County. Readers will share farm boy Artley's first-day agonies, the long walks to and from school, the school yard games, the Christmas program, and the annual picnic all recalled with his characteristic humor and insight. Everything that Artley experienced from the smell of scorched mittens left too long on the stove to dry to the excitement of performing in the school program is recalled here with delightful details, providing life lessons and delightful, warm memories. Artley is considered one of the country's foremost recorders of farm history. His wonderful artwork and stories reflect his sense of country nostalgia and farm heritage and speak to anyone with a farming...


Sarah
J. T. LeRoy
158234146X
June 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Who would have thought that there were so many truckstop devotees of cross-dressing children in West Virginia? In this disturbing debut novel by 19-year-old LeRoy, they appear to be everywhere. The narrator, a 12-year-old boy, has renamed himself Sarah after his whorish mother because he has learned from her example that "Most anything you want in this world is easier when you're a pretty girl." Following in her footsteps, he plies his trade at the Doves, a truckstop/gourmet restaurant run by Glad, a despotic pimp with a heart of gold. When his mother rejects him, Sarah runs away from the Doves and finds his way to the hellish Three Crutches, a rival truckstop run by the evil Le Loup. Taken for a girl, and then advertised as Saint Sarah in a money-making ploy by Le Loup, Sarah is expected to bless truckers and...


The Chicken That Won a Dogfight: The Humor and Hope of an Arkansas Boyhood
Ben Burton
0874832586
April 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The humor and the hope of an Arkansas boyhood, this book contains twenty, mostly-humorous stories of growing up in the depression-day deep south when FDR was "the savior" and battery powered radio was the only contact with the outside world. The one serious piece is the celebrated, award-winning story, The Martyrdom of Andy which has since been published in Chicken Soup for the Soul.

From the Publisher
This book falls somewhere between the work of Garrison Keillor and Robert Fulghum. Burton's stories about childhood during the depression are anything but depressing. Once you read this book you will want to share it with a loved one or a fri.

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At Home in Mitford
Jan Karon
0143035037
May 2005
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Father Tim, a cherished small-town rector, is the steadfast soldier in this beloved slice of life story set in an American village where the grass is still green, the pickets are still white, and the air still smells sweet. The rector's forthright secretary, Emma Garret, worries about her employer, as she sees past his Christian cheerfulness into his aching loneliness. Slowly but surely, the empty places in Father Tim's heart do get filled. First with a gangly stray dog, later with a seemingly stray boy, and finally with the realization that he is stumbling into love with his independent and Christian-wise next-door neighbor. Much more than a gentle love story, this is a homespun tale about a town of endearing characters-- including a mysterious jewel thief--who are as quirky and popular as those of Mayberry, R.F.D. ...


The Natural Man
Ed McClanahan
0917788567
September 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
THE NATURAL MAN is a comedy about coming of age in the late 1940s in an out-of-the-way corner of America called Needmore, Kentucky, "population 6 7/8 when they're all at home." At the center is Harry Eastep, a high school senior, bookish, bespectacled, filled with vague yearnings after the considerable person of Oodles Ockerman. Harry's intentions toward Oodles, never very pure in the first place, are refined by his new hero, Monk McHoring, the "natural man" who boasts the "dirtiest mind and the dirtiest mouth of any man or boy in the entire recorded history of Burdock County." "Takes you back to those terrible days of adolescence and makes you wonder how you survived." (B-O-T Editorial Review Board) --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From the Publisher


At Home in Mitford
Jan Karon
1589970004
September 2003
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
Father Tim, a cherished small-town rector, is the steadfast soldier in this beloved slice of life story set in an American village where the grass is still green, the pickets are still white, and the air still smells sweet. The rector's forthright secretary, Emma Garret, worries about her employer, as she sees past his Christian cheerfulness into his aching loneliness. Slowly but surely, the empty places in Father Tim's heart do get filled. First with a gangly stray dog, later with a seemingly stray boy, and finally with the realization that he is stumbling into love with his independent and Christian-wise next-door neighbor. Much more than a gentle love story, this is a homespun tale about a town of endearing characters-- including a mysterious jewel thief--who are as quirky and popular as those of Mayberry, R.F.D. ...


All My Meadows
Patricia Penton Leimbach
006097091X


·
 


At Home in Mitford
Jan Karon
0670882259
November 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Father Tim, a cherished small-town rector, is the steadfast soldier in this beloved slice of life story set in an American village where the grass is still green, the pickets are still white, and the air still smells sweet. The rector's forthright secretary, Emma Garret, worries about her employer, as she sees past his Christian cheerfulness into his aching loneliness. Slowly but surely, the empty places in Father Tim's heart do get filled. First with a gangly stray dog, later with a seemingly stray boy, and finally with the realization that he is stumbling into love with his independent and Christian-wise next-door neighbor. Much more than a gentle love story, this is a homespun tale about a town of endearing characters-- including a mysterious jewel thief--who are as quirky and popular as those of Mayberry, R.F.D. ...


Bob Artley's Memories of a Former Kid (Country Life)
Bob Artley
0896584933
July 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
An entertaining look at the challenges and charms of growing up on a farm.


Milk Glass Moon
Adriana Trigiani
0345466705
May 2005
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The third book in Trigiani's series about the middle-aged but young-at-heart Ave Maria of Big Stone Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains is simply made for the ear. The author colorfully and flawlessly captures the characters' southern and Italian accents, transporting listeners into Ave Maria's charmed world. She's a pharmacist in a small Virginia town but has relatives in Italy; and her daughter Etta has just entered her teen years, causing Ave Maria much heartache and uncertainty. She's torn between wanting Etta to mature and wishing Etta was much younger. She cheerfully discusses affairs from the daily chatter at the drugstore counter to more serious matters, such as the death of her son years earlier and her best friend Iva Lou's breast cancer. The dialogue is always snappy (e.g., after Ave Maria has seen a man...


Prairie Beat
Tony Bender
0970544243
November 1, 2002
Paperback
·
 
Jim Hornbeck, contributor to Chicken Soup for the Father's Soul
If you rupture a kidney laughing, it's your own damn fault.

Kent Brick, ND Living Magazine
Values that matter--that propel communities--get preserved and passed along through Tony's words.

See all Editorial Reviews


Teacher's Funeral: A Comedy in Three Parts
Richard Peck
0803727364
October 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 6 Up–C'mon back to rural Indiana in 1904 and join 15-year-old Russell, whose summer ends with the unexpected death of old Miss Myrt Arbuckle. Russell and his younger brother are thrilled because just maybe the school board will decide to stop its foolishness and tear down the one-room schoolhouse. Surely it doesn't pay to hire a new teacher for the six students who attend. But to his utter horror, one is hired and it's none other than his extremely bossy older sister, even though she still has a year left of high school herself. Tansy takes to teaching with vigor and manages to circumvent all of the high jinx and calamities that threaten to undermine her authority, such as an accidental fire in the privy and a puff adder in her desk drawer. Peck expertly evokes humor and...


The Great and Mighty Da-Da (Wisconsin)
Tony Bender
0970544219
November 1, 2001
Paperback
·
 
Bill Derby, News and Neighbor, Johnson City, TN, 2001
"He continues to make me laugh, inspire me and remind me of the great beauty of the great plains.”

Bob Booker, Jones Radio Network, Denver, Co, 2001
“Shades of Hemingway’s quiet strength and Kerouac’s satiric edge.”

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Do You, Rachel, Take Ranching for Better or for Worse
Larry Davis
096477092X
May 14, 1997
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Description
There's more to ranching than sitting atop a mighty steed and herding cattle. Klippenstein's unique insights and written snapshots of life on the prairie confirm the need for humor in everyone's life. The humor born out of life's experiences.

The reader is with Rachel as she milks a cow with mastitis and with her as she attempts to back a twenty-foot gooseneck stock trailer at the National Western Stock Show in Denver.

Walk with Marc and Rachel into an alfalfa field blooming with potential profit -- and then stand on the loading dock when the seed dealer offers to buy the precious seed for less than the cost of combining.

Share Rachel's frustration at mal-functioning appliances and the stinging of red ants. Join the author of Do You, Rachel, Take Ranching for Better or for Worse?...



The Poor Mouth: A Bad Story about the Hard Life
Flann O'Brien
1564780910
March 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
O'Brien's wicked satire on the life of Irish peasant Bonaparte O'Coonassa was published in Gaelic in 1941 and translated into English in 1964. This edition contains illustrations by Ralph Steadman. A good companion to the MacNamara novel reviewed above.Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Boston Globe
"O'Brien was one of the comic geniuses of the 20th century. . . . The Poor Mouth is wildly funny and Steadman's drawings catch the spirit."

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