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The Declaration of Independent Filmmaking
Mark Polish
0156029529
Oct 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This trio of award-winning independent film actors-writers-directors-producers reveal how their desire to make movies that fulfilled their vision led them to create a rigorous, economical regimen that, for those "willing to forego a visit to the dentist so they can instead buy film stock," and who aren't well-versed in the technical and logistical aspects of film-making, is well worth the book's cover price. Drawing on their experiences making three feature films (Twin Falls Idaho is perhaps the best known), the Polish brothers walk would-be filmmakers step-by-step from script-writing to post-production to distribution, with an explanation of each part of the process. The amount of detail packed into short chapters (particularly the chapters on directing and editing) is impressive, and informative sidebars and...


Don't Look Down
Jennifer Crusie
0312348126
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
A one-eyed alligator and a pre-Columbian collection of jade phallic symbols figure into this nutty swampland romp from Crusie (Faking It, etc.) and Mayer (Operation Dragon-Sim, etc.). Lucy Armstrong takes a break from doing dog food commercials to take over a full-length feature shoot in the Savannah River swamps, where she finds half the crew is missing, her ex-husband in charge of stunts and a nonsensical script. Meanwhile, Green Beret J.T. Wilder, stunt double to the lead actor who secretly works for the CIA, thought this gig would be easy money, but he soon finds himself embroiled in a money laundering scheme while trying to catch an arms dealer for the Russian mob, tracking a spy through the muck and resisting his growing desire for a woman who looks like Wonder Woman—Armstrong, natch. Plenty of big...


Ridley Scott Interviews
Ridley Scott
157806726X
Mar 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
Artisan, entrepreneur, and impresario, British filmmaker Ridley Scott accepts the profit motive as the only way to thrive in an industry where there is little patience for artistic flourishes or overblown expenses. Yet, while he may pay lip service to the free enterprise system, he is an unapologetic auteur, committed to using every element of film?from evocative lighting to digital composition?to overwhelm our senses and redefine how we perceive the future (Alien, Blade Runner), the past (1492: The Conquest of Paradise, Gladiator), and the present (Thelma & Louise, Black Hawk Down). This collection of interviews follows Scott over twenty-five years as he perfects the Ridley Scott look, builds his media empire, and reacts to the twenty-year cult status of Blade Runner. Throughout, he discusses the triumphs and...


Elia Kazan: A Biography
Richard Schickel
0060195797
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
When the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences decided to give Kazan (1909–2003) an honorary Oscar in 1999, it rekindled the lingering resentment over his testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee nearly 50 years earlier. Schickel, who produced a short film for the Academy's presentation and covered the controversy in his role as Time's movie critic, has virtually no sympathy for Kazan's detractors, arguing that HUAC was "a harsh and permanent fact of American life" in the early Cold War era and, more importantly, that Kazan was testifying against Stalinists, not innocent liberals. He also observes that Kazan's early efforts at self-defense may ironically have worked against him, sealing his image in the public eye. The biography's main goal, however, is to restore Kazan's artistic...


Brian de Palma
Brian de Palma
157806516X
Jan 2003
Paperback
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From Booklist
Although he will probably forever be most closely associated with the horror movies Carrie and The Fury, which put him on Hollywood's map, DePalma started out as a Godard-wanna-be in Greetings and Hi Mom, low-budget, politically conscious films starring a young Robert DeNiro, and has since directed everything from by-the-numbers blockbusters (Mission: Impossible) to bloated gangster flicks (Scarface, The Untouchables). Despite his eclecticism, he remains tainted by his reputation for violent misogyny (he cast his then-wife, Nancy Allen, as a prostitute in three consecutive films), the blatant Hitchcock rip-offs that characterized his early work, and the notorious megaflop Bonfire of the Vanities, which derailed his career in the early '90s. These 19 interviews, drawn from...


Don't Look Down
Jennifer Crusie
1593553730
April 2006
Compact Disc
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From Publishers Weekly
The pairing of readers Lawlor and Raudman misses more than it hits in this uneven audiobook. Lucy Armstrong, a director of dog food commercials, accepts the job of helming the last four days of an action-adventure movie. Before she has a chance to spend time with her sister, Daisy, who is also working on the film, Lucy is soon embroiled in a real-life adventure involving money laundering, kidnapping, the Russian mob, a one-eyed alligator and a most unexpected romance. In theory, the idea of having two readers portraying the male and female characters of a novel, as well as rotating chapters to correspond with the book's alternating viewpoints, would seem like a good one. Unfortunately, the audio suffers from poor production values. Raudman gives a rich, intimate sound to her reading, but Lawlor seems to be stuck...


Two Brothers
Jake Eberts
155704631X
June 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Set in the jungles of colonial Indochina in the early 1900s, Annaud’s film concerns twin tigers separated as cubs and taken into captivity only to be reunited years later as enemies by an explorer who inadvertently forces them to fight each other. To make the film, the director explains in this pictorial work, he collaborated with trainer Thierry Le Portier, with whom he’d worked on Gladiator, to capture such images as tigers running or climbing on tricky terrain, chasing vehicles and running through temples. He explains these aspects of the filmmaking process and more, offering an instructive glimpse into the world of depicting animals on film. There’s the technique of "getting tigers to act," which requires infinite patience and the ability to create a language common to the trainer and the...


Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith
Jonathan W. Rinzler
0345431359
April 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Packed with breathtaking visuals created by a team of world-class artists, The Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith reveals an essential element of the climactic finale of the Star Wars film saga. For years, George Lucas’s handpicked group has labored feverishly to bring Episode III’s unforgettable creatures, exotic worlds, and mind-bending action to life. Together, they created character drawings, costume designs, droids and starships, planetary vistas, animation sketches, matte paintings, and animatics–every type of illustration imaginable.

This extraordinary volume unveils the best of their efforts: never-before-seen images–storyboards, models, production sketches, and ILM-generated art–that chronicle the fascinating journey from first draft to...


Making Movies
Sidney Lumet
0679756604
March 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
It's well known that a vast number of people work on any given movie in roles as varied as writing scripts, choosing locations, dressing sets, costuming the players, lighting scenes, manipulating the camera, directing actors, editing film, working on sound, advertising the finished product, and screening it to an audience. Have you ever thought about how these components are collated? Or why the director is most often considered the author of a film? Wonder no more, because Sidney Lumet's Making Movies is a terrific journey through each stage of filmmaking that is overseen by the director. Lumet, the veteran director of Twelve Angry Men, The Pawnbroker, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Network, The Verdict, and many other fine movies, knows the ins and outs of American filmmaking...


Shock Value
John Waters
1560256982
Apr 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
"To me, bad taste is what entertainment is all about. If someone vomits watching one of my films, it's like getting a standing ovation." Thus begins John Waters's autobiography. And what a story it is. Opening with his upbringing in Baltimore ("Charm City" as dubbed by the tourist board; the "hairdo capital of the world" as dubbed by Waters), it covers his friendship with his muse and leading lady, Divine, detailed accounts of how Waters made his first movies, stories of the circle of friends - actors he used in these films, and finally the "sort-of fame" he achieves in America. Complementing the text are dozens of fabulous old photographs of Waters and crew. Here is a true love letter from a legendary filmmaker to his friends, family, and fans.


Memoirs of a Geisha: Images from the Film
David James
1557046832
December 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Arthur Golden's 1997 tale appealed to director Marshall (Chicago) for the same reasons it attracted millions of readers: because it "not only peers into the fascinating and forbidden world of a geisha's life in 1930s Japan, but also tells the emotional tale of one particular girl's journey." This accompanying volume to the forthcoming film based on the book will certainly enchant fans. In his introduction, Golden recalls how "curious" it was for him to walk around a full-scale geisha district of the 1930s built on a field in California and know that such a detailed set grew out of his grueling experience writing the novel. A history of the geisha comes next, and then a portfolio of images from the film, some quite striking (such as the one of geisha practicing movements with fans, hair down, relaxed in their...


Feature Filmmaking at Used-Car Prices
Rick Schmidt
0140291849
June 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
In this revised and updated edition of Feature Filmmaking at Used-Car Prices, Rick Schmidt shows aspiring filmmakers step-by-step how to create a feature film for the price of a used car. Featuring extensive new material on using digital video technology and making the most of Internet resources, Schmidt's practical, no-nonsense handbook reveals the insider secrets to:

Selecting and writing a story that can be produced on a tight budget
Rallying a filmmaking team through creative contracts
Shooting and editing with an original style
Marketing the finished film and dealing with agents
Making a collaborative feature

Fully revised and updated to cover the new technology that continues to revolutionize low-budget filmaking, Schmidt's guide is as useful and relevant as ever. Complete...


The Big Picture: The New Logic of Money and Power in Hollywood
Edward Jay Epstein
0812973828
January 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. To appear in 2003's Terminator 3, Arnold Schwarzenegger received a fixed fee of $29.25 million, a package of perks totaling $1.5 million and a guaranteed 20% of gross receipts from all sources of revenue worldwide. With that, writes Epstein (Inquest: The Warren Commission and the Establishment of Truth), no matter the film's box office results, "the star was assured of making more money than the studio itself." Such is the "new logic" Epstein explores in this engrossing book. Gone are the days of studio chiefs dominating their stars with punitive contracts and controlling product from script to big screen. Writers now sell their work to the highest bidder, stars have become one-person corporations who "rent" their services to individual productions, and the studios have morphed into what Epstein...


The Man and His Wings
William Wellman, Jr.
0275985415
Feb 2006
Hardcover
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Review
“If there is one through-line in Wellmans career it is his devotion to aviation, and this book focuses largely on his life-changing experiences during World War One, when he joined the Lafayette Flying Corps in France. Fortunately his letters home were saved, and they provide the most personal and revelatory passages in this volume. They are accompanied by previously unpublished family photos. Wellman, Jr. then illustrates how his fathers life experiences informed his work behind the camera, leading up to his production of the World War One aviation epic Wings in 1927. The Man and His Wings is a slender but welcome addition to the film history bookshelf, all the more so since Frank Thompsons excellent career study of Wellman and the directors autobiography (A Short Time for Insanity) are out of print.”–Leonard...


Filmmaking for Teens: Pulling off Your Shorts
Troy Lanier
1932907041
April 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Teenagers can "stop dreaming and start creating" with this guide to making their first film. The authors, who teach filmmaking at an Austin, Tex., high school, suggest starting with a short-a five-minute film. They recommend that teens have a script before they begin, and be ready to take on many responsibilities: writer, producer, director and editor. Shooting should take place over the course of a long weekend, and filmmakers must set a deadline to have the film finished (aided by picking a festival or contest that has a submission deadline four to six weeks after they wrap). Lanier and Nichols urge budding moviemakers to use a digital camera and editing software, yet they caution readers not to blow all their savings. Spend money on equipment, they say, but scrounge for everything else. Throughout, they try to...


The Passion of David Lynch
Martha P. Nochimson
0292755651
Jan 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
Filmmaker David Lynch asserts that when he is directing, ninety percent of the time he doesn't know what he is doing. To understand Lynch's films, Martha Nochimson believes, requires a similar method of being open to the subconscious, of resisting the logical reductiveness of language. In this innovative book, she draws on these strategies to offer close readings of Lynch's films, informed by unprecedented, in-depth interviews with Lynch himself. Nochimson begins with a look at Lynch's visual influences--Jackson Pollock, Francis Bacon, and Edward Hopper--and his links to Alfred Hitchcock and Orson Welles, then moves into the heart of her study, in-depth analyses of Lynch's films and television productions. These include Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, Wild at Heart, Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet, Dune, The Elephant Man,...


My First Movie: Twenty Celebrated Directors Talk about Their First Film
Stephen Lowenstein (Editor)
0142002208
October 2002
Paperback
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From Booklist
They say you never forget the first time, and 20 prominent directors reminisce vividly about their inaugural efforts behind the camera in this collection of original interviews. Editor Lowenstein, a filmmaker himself, elicits candid and revealing responses from subjects representing mainstream Hollywood (Oliver Stone, Anthony Minghella), American independent (the Coen Brothers, Kevin Smith), British (Mike Leigh, Neil Jordan), and foreign-language filmmaking (Ang Lee, Pedro Almodovar). Most are very forthcoming about insecurities and blunders as they impart information that is alternately entertaining and technical, though many admit to surprising technical ignorance when they launched their careers. Despite their varied personalities and filmmaking approaches, the directors radiate enthusiasm, and Lowenstein speculates...


Jean Renoir PB
Andre Bazin
0306804654
Apr 1992
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French


Cinema of George Lucas
Marcus Hearn
0810949687
April 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The life and career of the one-man cinematic revolution that is George Lucas gets a lush visual treatment in Hearn's frankly adoring and uncritical coffee-table book, though there's plenty of smart text underpinning the artwork as well. The first two of the book's eight chapters are best, covering Lucas's childhood and student filmmaking days at USC, which culminated in the 1971 masterpiece THX 1138 and 1973's iconic American Graffiti. Hearn deftly portrays this heady period in Lucas's life, in which the director was furiously experimenting with the form and working inside the short-lived San Francisco filmmaking collective American Zoetrope with pals Francis Ford Coppola, master editor Walter Murch and legendary cinematographer Haskell Wexler. This section is elaborately illustrated with photographs, publicity...

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