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Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq
Stephen Kinzer
0805078614
April 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The recent ouster of Saddam Hussein may have turned "regime change" into a contemporary buzzword, but it's been a tactic of American foreign policy for more than 110 years. Beginning with the ouster of Hawaii's monarchy in 1893, Kinzer runs through the foreign governments the U.S. has had a hand in toppling, some of which he has written about at length before (in All the Shah's Men, etc.). Recent invasions of countries such as Grenada and Panama may be more familiar to readers than earlier interventions in Iran and Nicaragua, but Kinzer, a foreign correspondent for the New York Times, brings a rich narrative immediacy to all of his stories. Although some of his assertions overreach themselves—as when he proposes that better conduct by the American government in the Spanish-American War might have prevented...


1491
Charles C. Mann
140004006X
Aug 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
1491 is not so much the story of a year, as of what that year stands for: the long-debated (and often-dismissed) question of what human civilization in the Americas was like before the Europeans crashed the party. The history books most Americans were (and still are) raised on describe the continents before Columbus as a vast, underused territory, sparsely populated by primitives whose cultures would inevitably bow before the advanced technologies of the Europeans. For decades, though, among the archaeologists, anthropologists, paleolinguists, and others whose discoveries Charles C. Mann brings together in 1491, different stories have been emerging. Among the revelations: the first Americans may not have come over the Bering land bridge around 12,000 B.C. but by boat along the Pacific coast 10 or even 20 thousand years earlier; the Americas...


Ancient Mexico and Central America: Archaeology and Culture History
Susan Toby Toby Evans
0500284407
April 2004
Textbook Paperback
·
 


The Path Between the Seas
David McCullough
0671244094
Jan 1978
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
On December 31, 1999, after nearly a century of rule, the United States officially ceded ownership of the Panama Canal to the nation of Panama. That nation did not exist when, in the mid-19th century, Europeans first began to explore the possibilities of creating a link between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the narrow but mountainous isthmus; Panama was then a remote and overlooked part of Colombia.

All that changed, writes David McCullough in his magisterial history of the Canal, in 1848, when prospectors struck gold in California. A wave of fortune seekers descended on Panama from Europe and the eastern United States, seeking quick passage on California-bound ships in the Pacific, and the Panama Railroad, built to serve that traffic, was soon the highest-priced stock listed on the New York Exchange. To build...



A Walk in the Woods : Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail (Official Guides to the Appalachian Trail)
Bill Bryson
0767902521
May 4, 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
Bill Bryson has made a living out of traveling and then writing about it. In The Lost Continent he re-created the road trips of his childhood; in Neither Here nor There he retraced the route he followed as a young backpacker traversing Europe. When this American transplant to Britain decided to return home, he made a farewell walking tour of the British countryside and produced Notes from a Small Island. Once back on American soil and safely settled in New Hampshire, Bryson once again hears the siren call of the open road--only this time it's a trail. The Appalachian Trail, to be exact. In A Walk in the Woods Bill Bryson tackles what is, for him, an entirely new subject: the American wilderness. Accompanied only by his old college buddy Stephen Katz, Bryson starts out one March morning in north Georgia, intending to walk the...


Brief History of Central America
Hector Perez-Brignoli
0520068327
November 1989
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Resource-poor Central America, except for its proximity to the Panama Canal, had been ignored by most of the world until the 1979 Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua. Dictatorship, repression, and poverty in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and neighboring Belize and Panama, or the fragility of democratic Costa Rica, little interested the average American until Reagan made the region an international issue. Since then, studies and commentaries, most of them partisan, have multiplied. In contrast, Perez-Brignoli's brief history is balanced. Ralph Lee Woodward Jr.'s Central America: A Nation Divided (LJ 6/15/76; 1985. 2d ed.) is still the best history in English, but this Costa Rican scholar offers a judicious Central American viewpoint. In his view, the seeds of the current crisis were and are sown by...


To Hell and Back
Audie Murphy
0805070869
May 2002
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Texan Audie Murphy was the most highly decorated G.I. of World War II, being awarded almost every medal the Army could offer as well as the Congressional Medal of Honor. His memoir of the war is a classic, still retaining some popularity. Tom Parker brings this terse yet vivid and articulate memoir to life. Able to give each of Murphy's comrades credible accents and characterizations, Parker's clear and well-paced reading is a joy. For popular and military collections.AMichael T. Fein, Catawba Valley Community Coll., Hickory, NCCopyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From AudioFile
Audie Murphy hit the big time with this simple, compelling narrative of his time as an infantryman in WW II Europe. It is a...


The American Practical Navigator: "Bowditch"
Nathaniel Bowditch, National Imagery and Mapping Agency
0939837544
September 25, 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This is a new edition of The American Practical Navigator, "Bowditch," offered by Celestaire and Paradise Cay Publications. This new edition is the most recent update of Bowditch, the definitive work on navigation. Nathanial Bowditch first published this encyclopedic work in 1802. During the last two centuries over 75 editions, almost 1,000,000 copies, of Bowditch have been published by the US Government. It has lived because it has combined the best technologies of each generation of navigator. This new Bicentennial Edition includes the latest advances in electronic navigation and digital charting technology. It also covers nonelectronic navigation such as celestial, plotting and dead reckoning. Bowditch contains numerous tables which have been valued for years by practicing navigators. Bowditch is carried on the...


The Darkest Jungle: The True Story of the Darien Expedition and America's Ill-Fated Race to Connect the Seas
Todd Balf
064168620X

Hardcover
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I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala
Rigoberta Menchu, et al
0860917886
June 1987
Paperback
·
 
From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
"This is my testimony. I didn't learn it from a book and I didn't learn it alone... My personal experience is the reality of a whole people." Born in the mountains of Guatemala into the Quiche, one of twenty-three mestizo groups, Rigoberta Menchu tells her story. The Quiche people's spirituality, much of which must not be told to outsiders, affirms community responsibility for village children and intensely personal relationships with the land and the natural world. The celebration of her ancient culture is all that strengthens in the face of a brutally repressed and poverty-stricken existence. Two of her brothers die as infants from malnutrition. When the Quiche begin their fight to keep the government and big-business people from stealing any more of their land, her family is...


The Path Between the Seas
David McCullough
0743262131
June 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
On December 31, 1999, after nearly a century of rule, the United States officially ceded ownership of the Panama Canal to the nation of Panama. That nation did not exist when, in the mid-19th century, Europeans first began to explore the possibilities of creating a link between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the narrow but mountainous isthmus; Panama was then a remote and overlooked part of Colombia.

All that changed, writes David McCullough in his magisterial history of the Canal, in 1848, when prospectors struck gold in California. A wave of fortune seekers descended on Panama from Europe and the eastern United States, seeking quick passage on California-bound ships in the Pacific, and the Panama Railroad, built to serve that traffic, was soon the highest-priced stock listed on the New York Exchange. To build...



1491
Charles C. Mann
1565119789
Sept 2005
Audio Compact Disc - Abridged
·
 
Book Review
1491 is not so much the story of a year, as of what that year stands for: the long-debated (and often-dismissed) question of what human civilization in the Americas was like before the Europeans crashed the party. The history books most Americans were (and still are) raised on describe the continents before Columbus as a vast, underused territory, sparsely populated by primitives whose cultures would inevitably bow before the advanced technologies of the Europeans. For decades, though, among the archaeologists, anthropologists, paleolinguists, and others whose discoveries Charles C. Mann brings together in 1491, different stories have been emerging. Among the revelations: the first Americans may not have come over the Bering land bridge around 12,000 B.C. but by boat along the Pacific coast 10 or even 20 thousand years...


The Maya: Life, Myth, and Art
Timothy Laughton
0760748594
February 2004
Hardcover
·
 


Inhuman Bondage : The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World
David Brion Davis
0195140737
April 1, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Pulitzer Prize-winner Davis follows Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery with this impressive and sprawling history of "human attempts to dehumanize other people" that focuses extensively on slave rebellions. These counter-attempts, Davis argues, are what form the base of the identities and communities of the descendants of New World slaves. In charting the evolution of slavery and societies' responses to it from 71 BCE to 1948, Davis author shows how ancient slavery practices mirrored the process of animal domestication, explores the moral conflicts the United States faced during the American Revolution and how the Haitian revolutions disrupted the class system. A lengthy and especially informative study of British and American abolitionist movements paves the way for a concise breakdown of American slavery...


Aztec, Inca, & Maya
Elizabeth Baquedano
0756613833
Sept 2005
(Hardcover) - Revised Ed.
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5-The three major civilizations of the Americas are introduced here in a compare-and-contrast, scattershot approach. Small, sparkling, full-color captioned photographs of cities, pottery, jewelry, and clothing accompany one-paragraph texts on such general topics (treated on two pages each) as farming, hunting and fishing, family life, and more. Photos of the Mexican National Archeological Museum's re-creations of scenes of daily life are used to depict such ancient activities as trade, tribute, and medicine. Illustrations from the pages of the Mayan codices are reproduced throughout, but there is no explanation of their significance until page 40, or of what the conquering Spaniards did with them. Although the pictures are bright, clear, and attention grabbing, the text is just random facts scattered...


The History of Central America (Greenwood Histories of the Modern Nations Series)
Thomas L. Pearcy
0313322937
December 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Central America is an extraordinarily beautiful part of the world, with sweeping panoramic vistas of tropical vegetation, towering mountains, and striking ethnic and racial diversity. This tropical paradise has a history as diverse as its people and cultures. Starting with the Maya in ancient Mesoamerica, the History of Central America continues with European contact and the subsequent subjugation of the people of Central America. Spaniards established and ruled their Central American empire during the Colonial period. This led to the National period, independence movements, and the subsequent development of independent, sovereign Central American nations. By the mid-20th century, the economies, governments, and populations of the seven republics had evolved so distinctly that each has its own unique set of challenges...


True History of Chocolate
Sophie D. Coe
0500282293
October 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The Coes, both anthropologists with a culinary bent, delve deeply into the history of their mouth-watering subject. The material on ancient cultures is particularly fascinating--did you know that the Maya used unsweetened liquid chocolate as currency? And in a chapter called "Chocolate for the Masses," they detail the modernization of chocolate manufacture, which has allowed more than 25 million Hershey's Kisses to roll off the conveyor belt each day. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Rick Bayless, owner of Chicago's Frontera Grill and Topolobampo
A masterpiece of scholarship, passion, and wit. No stone (or page) is left unturned, no folk history is left unchallenged in search of chocolate's veritable True History. --This text...


Empires of the Atlantic World : Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830
John H. Elliott
0300114311
May 8, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In a masterful account, Oxford don Elliott explores the simultaneous development of Spanish and English colonies in the so-called New World. Though colonists tried to recreate traditional institutions on American soil, there were inevitable differences between colonial life and life in the mother countries: familial roles, for example, were reconfigured across the ocean. In addition to differing from Europe, Spanish and British settlements differed from one another, says Elliott. Whereas Spain determined to prevent Jews and Moors from entering its territories, Britain's grudging acceptance of religious diversity was evidenced in the Crown's allowing, and in some cases encouraging, persecuted minorities to join colonial ventures. The English colonies' fractious Protestantism made Spain's...


My Invented Country
Isabelle Allende
0060545674
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Description

Isabel Allende evokes the magnificent landscapes of her country; a charming, idiosyncratic Chilean people with a violent history and an indomitable spirit, and the politics, religion, myth, and magic of her homeland that she carries with her even today.

The book circles around two life-changing moments. The assassination of her uncle Salvador Allende Gossens on September 11, 1973, sent her into exile and transformed her into a literary writer. And the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, on her adopted homeland, the United States, brought forth an overdue acknowledgment that Allende had indeed left home. My Invented Country, mimicking the workings of memory itself, ranges back and forth across that distance between past and present lives. It speaks compellingly to immigrants and to all of us who try to...



Understanding Central America: Global Forces, Rebellion, and Change, Fourth Edition
John A. Booth
0813341957
July 2005
Textbook Paperback
·
 


The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aztec & Maya
Charles Phillips
0754814890
Feb 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This book offers enthralling insights into the history, mythology legends of the peoples of Mesoamerica, lavishly illustrated throughout.


Galapagos: A Natural History
Michael H. Jackson
1895176409
May 1994
Paperback
·
 


Seal!: From Vietnam's Phoenix Program to Central America's Drug Wars: Twenty-Six Years with a Special Operations Warrior
Michael J. Walsh
0671868535
October 1994
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Description
A MAN OF ACTION This is the extraordinary story of Lt. Cmdr. Michael J. Walsh, a veteran of twenty-six years of combat with the Navy's most elite special force -- the legendary SEALs. Outspoken renegade and consummate survivalist, Walsh began as a key player in the Vietnam War's top-secret PHOENIX Program. For a PHOENIX operative the goal was simple: invade the enemy's home and take him captive; remove the target alive if possible, dead if necessary. The Viet Cong soon feared Walsh so much that they placed a bounty of thousands of dollars on his head. A MAN OF WAR After five tours in Vietnam, Walsh refused to take a desk job, and subsequently spent more than two decades in combat in such explosive arenas as Lebanon and drug-infested Central America. From killing a VC general in hand-to-hand combat, to stalking...


Lost City
Ted Lewin
0399233024
June 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 4-7-In 1911, Hiram Bingham and a team of archaeologists went in search of Vilcapampa, the legendary lost city of the Inca. In this picture-book account of that expedition, Lewin relates Bingham's journey from Cusco to the jungles of Peru and from there, led by a local child, to mountaintop ruins. The site wasn't Vilcapampa, but rather an isolated, impenetrable ancient city of temples, dwellings, plazas, and terraces connected by steep staircases. Distinguished double-page watercolor paintings capture the grandeur of the location, the monumental solidity of the Inca stonework, and the surrounding jungle. The final pages continue the story with information on the work involved in preparing the ruins for excavation and some initial findings and include a useful pronunciation guide to Spanish and Quechua...


California : America's High-Stakes Experiment
Peter Schrag
0520244362
April 20, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Once blessed with a superb educational system, well-funded infrastructure and competent, vigorous state government, California now wrestles with lousy schools, decrepit public services and government gridlock. This incisive study traces the decline to a state constitution that requires unobtainable legislative super-majorities to pass taxes, spending increases and budgets; to America's nationwide antitax ideology, which was jump-started by California's infamous Proposition 13; and to term limits that have made the legislature a collection of neophytes. With the legislative process paralyzed, the author observes, lawmaking has devolved to ad hoc ballot initiatives—a hoary populist nostrum now exploited by monied special interests—with which voters impose burdensome spending mandates on the state while...


American Foundations: An Investigative History
Mark Dowie
0262041898
April 16, 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
Investigative journalist Dowie--author, most recently, of Losing Ground: American Environmentalism at the Close of the Twentieth Century (1996)--turns his attention to organized philanthropy, a world at once highly visible and widely misunderstood. Dowie draws on academic literature, foundation archives, and more than 200 interviews with foundation officers, critics, and grant recipients in assessing the recent history of foundations and projecting the changes they face. In the face of crisis, Dowie suggests, organized philanthropy has been "slow to see problems coming, slow to respond, and quick to justify every decision." Dowie applies a public perspective, analyzing how effectively foundations have contributed to public education, science, health care, the environment, the arts and humanities, and civil society....


The Costa Rica Reader: History, Culture, Politics
Steven Paul Palmer (Editor)
0822333724
October 2004
Paperback
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Heather Wisner, Costa Rica Outdoors
"[W]orthwhile. . . . complex and compelling." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Robert Goodier, Tico Times
"[A] poignant resource for anyone with an eye on the country, whether traveler . . . or Costa Rican national." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


OSS
R. Harris Smith
1592287298
Aug 2005
Paperback
·
 
Review
"The best book about America's first modern secret service . . . Smith, combining the style of a journalist with the scholarly approach of the political scientist, has provided an excellent overview of the role of OSS during the two-front war against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan . . . Tracing the names, the half-submerged links between the intelligence community and what Richard Rovere has called the American Establishment, is what makes Smith's book so fascinating and valuable."--Washington Post Book World

"Smith's absorbing book is really an introduction to what the OSS and its crew of generally exceptionally able and imaginative employees was all about."--Foreign Service Journal

"He describes how the OSS figured in, and was related to, the whole diplomatic and military history of the...

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