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The Great Taos Bank Robbery: And Other True Stories of the Southwest

0060937122


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From AudioFile
Capturing the listener with his soft drawl, Tony Hillerman reads stories based on real-life events in Taos and other areas of New Mexico. He expertly adds personal flair and deep feelings to his stories, including a lot of humor and good-natured comments about the land and the people. During some of the stories Hillerman seems to be speaking directly to the listener. Hearing the author read allows the listener to learn a little about Hillerman the man, as well as the country he so obviously loves. His performance adds immensely to the value of these stories. P.A.J. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

--New Mexican
"This collection is the essence of Hillerman, which is always instructive fun." --This text refers to the...


Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics
Gilbert M. Joseph (Editor)
0822330423
January 2003
Paperback
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From Booklist
This massive compilation of articles, essays, poetry, and photographs provides a wonderful introduction to the history and culture of Mexico. Joseph and Henderson are both historians with extensive backgrounds in Latin American and Mexican history. They have selected an eclectic mix of writers, many of them Mexican, including Carlos Fuentes and Octavio Paz. Topics range from the origins and growth of the Aztec Empire to the causes of the Mexican Revolution to the problems facing modern Mexico. There are well-thought-out political tracts here, as well as screeds against political corruption and economic exploitation that drip with outrage. What emerges is a portrait of the "many Mexicos" in which the wealthy, the growing middle class, and the impoverished indigenous peoples are all struggling to find their place in an...


Aztec, Inca, & Maya
Elizabeth Baquedano
0756613833
Sept 2005
(Hardcover) - Revised Ed.
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5-The three major civilizations of the Americas are introduced here in a compare-and-contrast, scattershot approach. Small, sparkling, full-color captioned photographs of cities, pottery, jewelry, and clothing accompany one-paragraph texts on such general topics (treated on two pages each) as farming, hunting and fishing, family life, and more. Photos of the Mexican National Archeological Museum's re-creations of scenes of daily life are used to depict such ancient activities as trade, tribute, and medicine. Illustrations from the pages of the Mayan codices are reproduced throughout, but there is no explanation of their significance until page 40, or of what the conquering Spaniards did with them. Although the pictures are bright, clear, and attention grabbing, the text is just random facts scattered...


The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aztec & Maya
Charles Phillips
0754814890
Feb 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book offers enthralling insights into the history, mythology legends of the peoples of Mesoamerica, lavishly illustrated throughout.


Francisco Vasquez De Coronado: Famous Journeys to the American Southwest and Colonial New Mexico (Library of Explorers and Exploration)

0823936198


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Mexico the Beautiful Cookbook: Authentic Recipes from the Regions of Mexico
Susanna Palazuelos
000215949X
August 1991
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
The latest addition to this popular series is a colorful guide to Mexico's diverse regional cuisine. Palazuelos is an experienced chef/caterer, and her recipes are inviting, her headnotes informative; Ignacio Urquiza's photographs of the food are eyecatching but uncontrived. There are many unusual dishes here, both traditional and contemporary, and most are far more sophisticated than the Tex-Mex fare many Americans identify as Mexican food. A good companion to Patricia Quintana's The Taste of Mexico ( LJ 12/86); recommended for most collections.Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
The drama of Mexico's tumultuous history--the rise and fall of the Olmec and Maya civilizations, the magnificent Aztec world that greeted Cortes, the arrival of the...


The Day After Roswell
Philip Corso
067101756X
June 1, 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
If you've ever wondered what crashed into the desert near Roswell, New Mexico, in 1947, this book will give you some startling answers. While the first version was published in hardcover in 1997, Corso provides new evidence for the presence of alien intruders in this pocket paperback edition. Whether or not you believe his contention, the sheer weight of governmental sources and documentation presented by the former Army intelligence officer is not easily dismissed. Once you understand the historical context (in the midst of the Cold War soon after World War II, with Orson Welles having recently inspired panic in citizens with his fictional War of the Worlds radio broadcast), the military deciding to cover up a real-life alien ship becomes more credible. Corso also gives a convincing explanation of why reports were so...


The Wheel of Time
Carlos Casteneda
074341280X
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Review
Deepak ChopraCarlos Castaneda is one of the most profound and influential thinkers of this century. His insights are paving the direction for the future evolution of human consciousness. We should all be deeply indebted to him.
The New York Times Book ReviewWe are incredibly fortunate to have Carlos Castaneda's books. Taken together they form a work among the best that the science of anthropology has produced.

Review
The New York Times Book Review We are incredibly fortunate to have Carlos Castaneda's books. Taken together they form a work among the best that the science of anthropology has produced.

See all Editorial Reviews


Ringside Seat to a Revolution: An Underground Cultural History of El Paso and Juarez: 1893-1923
David Dorado Romo
0938317911
October 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
Romo submits that his book is about what he calls an offbeat collection of individuals who were in El Paso and Juarez during the Mexican Revolution, "one of the most fascinating periods in the region's history." The author, who was raised in El Paso and Juarez, chronicles the point of view of those people whom official histories have considered peripheral to the main events--military band musicians who played Verdi operas during executions, filmmakers who came to the border to make silent movies, female bullfighters, anarchists, poets, spies with Graflex cameras, pool hustlers reborn as postcard salesmen, illegal Chinese aliens, radical feminists, and smugglers. More than 200 archival black-and-white photographs enhance Romo's lively text. They show spectators watching the Battle of Juarez from trains, women drinking from...


Ancient Mexico and Central America: Archaeology and Culture History
Susan Toby Toby Evans
0500284407
April 2004
Textbook Paperback
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The Texas Rangers and the Mexican Revolution
Charles H. Harris, III
0826334830
Sept 2004
Hardcover
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Library Journal, October 1, 2004
"Previous accounts…tend to be pro- or anti-Ranger… this balanced and well-written account is recommended for Texas libraries."

Dallas Morning News,November 19, 2004
"Ranger aficionados...will be grateful for [this] insightful revision … This evenhanded account memorializes the daunting complexities of Rangers' effort[s]."

See all Editorial Reviews


Hard Line
Ken Ellingwood
1400033675
July 2005
Paperback
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Review
“Portrays [its] characters with rare objectivity; Ellingwood writes with compassion for people on both sides of the border. . . . At times the stories become as dramatic as any good fiction.” –The San Diego Union-Tribune

“The bodies moving north across the border are stories. This is a book as much about people as it is about policy. Ken Ellingwood has gathered here the voices with compassion, with wisdom.” –Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street

“Well chronicled. . . . Eminently readable.” –San Francisco Chronicle

“Ellingwood has thoroughly and compassionately catalogued the stories of the major players in the border saga. . . . Disturbing and graphic.” –The Washington Post Book...


In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex
Nathaniel Philbrick
0141001828
May 1, 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The appeal of Dava Sobel's Longitude was, in part, that it illuminated a little-known piece of history through a series of captivating incidents and engaging personalities. Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea is certainly cast from the same mold, examining the 19th-century Pacific whaling industry through the arc of the sinking of the whaleship Essex by a boisterous sperm whale. The story that inspired Herman Melville's classic Moby-Dick has a lot going for it--derring-do, cannibalism, rescue--and Philbrick proves an amiable and well-informed narrator, providing both context and detail. We learn about the importance and mechanics of blubber production--a vital source of oil--and we get the nuts and bolts of harpooning and life aboard whalers. We are spared neither the nitty-gritty of open boats nor the sucking of...


Rain of Gold
Victor Villasenor
038531177X
September 1992
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Novelist ( Macho ) and screenwriter Villasenor recounts the adventures and struggles of three generations of his family in this earthy Mexican American saga. His father, Juan Salvador, who fled a Mexico torn by revolution, was imprisoned at the Arizona state penitentiary at age 12 for stealing $6 worth of ore from the mine where he worked. He escaped. The author's mother, Lupe, was born in an exploitative U.S.-run gold mine in Mexico, where her brother was narrowly saved from hanging by their gutsy mother, a Yaqui Indian. Juan and Lupe bought a pool hall in the barrio of Carlsbad, Calif., the year Prohibition ended. Villasenor is a born storyteller, and this Latino Roots , though marred at times by sentimentality and cliches, is a gripping, inspirational epic full of wild adventure, bootlegging, young love,...


Viva Mexico!: A Story of Benito Juarez and Cinco de Mayo
Argentina Palacios
0811480542
January 1993
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 2-4-- An easy biography , combined with a brief and accurate explanation of the Battle of Puebla, which occurred during Juarez's presidency and is the basis for the holiday celebrated on the fifth of May ( Cinco de Mayo ) . Palacio's vivid, informal writing will appeal to readers. Her facts are well researched, and transitions are fairly smooth. There is an introductory note by Alex Haley and an end note about Cinco de Mayo that briefly summarizes the main ideas. The stylized illustrations are simple and informative. There are no source notes, glossary, or index. Overall, a book that will bring a remarkable person to the attention of readers of all ethnicities.- Graciela Italiano, California State Polytechnic University, PomonaCopyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the...


Opening Mexico
Samuel Dillon
0374529647
Mar 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Preston and Dillon, former Mexico bureau chiefs for the New York Times, combine personal experience and journalistic accounts in this thoughtful report on the trials of Mexico's turbulent first taste of democracy after decades of authoritarian rule. With grace and candor, the authors capture this transitional period, which has been characterized by a slow and tense crumbling of Mexico's main political party, the PRI (a victim of its own incompetence and hubris), and a rapid increase in civic fervor. This is a portrait of historical change of seismic proportion, told from individual perspectives, depicting an intriguing web of heroic Mexicans struggling to bring about cultural change while others tend toward corruption. As a result, this book is as bleak as it is insightful. Hopeful victories in this "imperfect...


In Search of Captain Zero: A Surfer's Road Trip Beyond the End of the Road
Allan Weisbecker
1585421774
September 16, 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
In 1966, Allan Weisbecker "made a Manhattan run from the landlocked suburbs" to take in a siren-song movie called The Endless Summer, a documentary that depicted the carefree life of two beach bums who roamed the world in quest of the perfect wave. Weisbecker was hooked, and he became a hardcore wave rider, a fixture on the Long Island surf scene. With a friend, Christopher, he also undertook illegal ways to finance his passion, transporting drugs from exotic countries, a business only briefly interrupted when Christopher went off to Vietnam. There he took fire and came home scarred; something in him changed, and one day he simply vanished.

Weisbecker's book, a sort of gonzo detective story blended with travelogue and peppered with hang-10 jargon, does many things, all of them very well indeed. It offers up a vision of...



Malinche
Laura Esquivel
0743290348
February 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Laura Esquivel, la Princesa de la literatura latinoamericana, está de regreso!Su nueva novela Malinche es el extraordinario recuento del trágico y apasionado amor entre el conquistador Hernán Cortés y la india Malinalli, su intérprete durante la conquista del imperio azteca. Cuando Malinalli conoce a Cortés asume que se trata del propio Dios Quetzalcóatl que regresa a liberar a su pueblo. Los dos se enamoran apasionadamente, pero este amor pronto es destruido por la desmedida sed de conquista, poder y riqueza de Cortés. A lo largo de la historia de México Malinalli/Malinche ha sido conocida por su traición al pueblo indio. Pero recientes investigaciones históricas han mostrado que Malinalli fue la mediadora entre dos culturas, la hispánica y la...


The Maya
Michael D. Coe
0500285055
May 2005
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Because of the wealth of new archaeological data and breakthroughs in the translation of hieroglyphs, Coe's updating of his classic synthesis of Maya civilization provides a valuable service to both informed lay readers and specialists wishing to apprise themselves of the current state of understanding of this most intellectually sophisticated and aesthetically refined pre-Columbian culture. Although the vast majority of the text may be found in the prior edition, the work is transformed by significant interpolations and deletions and is augmented by a new section of color plates, a useful guide for travelers, and a listing of Maya rulers. As it now stands, this refreshed and renewed little masterpiece merits a place in collections serving students of ancient Mesoamerica. Continuing a tradition of massive...


The Hummingbird's Daughter
Luis Alberto Urrea
0316154520
April 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. "Her powers were growing now, like her body. No one knew where the strange things came from. Some said they sprang up in her after the desert sojourn with Huila. Some said they came from somewhere else, some deep inner landscape no one could touch. That they had been there all along." Teresita, the real-life "Saint of Cabora," was born in 1873 to a 14-year-old Indian girl impregnated by a prosperous rancher near the Mexico-Arizona border. Raised in dire poverty by an abusive aunt, the little girl still learned music and horsemanship and even to read: she was a "chosen child," showing such remarkable healing powers that the ranch's medicine woman took her as an apprentice, and the rancher, Don Tomás Urrea, took her—barefoot and dirty—into his own household. At 16, Teresita was...


The Olmecs
Richard A. Diehl
0500285039
Oct 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
"The first truly complete and authoritative account of this 3,000-year-old culture."—Michael D. CoeThe Olmecs of southern Mexico are America's oldest civilization and Mesoamerica's "Mother Culture." Famous for their Colossal Heads carved from giant boulders, the Olmecs have fascinated the public and archaeologists since the 1940s when National Geographic magazine reported the initial explorations of their centers. Despite well-publicized discoveries of spectacular basalt sculptures, portable jade objects, and richly decorated pottery vessels, until recently almost nothing was known about Olmec history, foreign contacts, and daily life. Now archaeologists have recovered information that allows them to assemble a remarkably broad picture of Olmec culture, its accomplishments, and its impact on later Mexican...


The Labyrinth of Solitude
Octavio Paz
080215042X
June 1985
Paperback
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Book Review
First published in 1950, The Labyrinth of Solitude addresses issues that are both seemingly eternal and resoundingly contemporary: the nature of political power in post-conquest Mexico, the relation of Native Americans to Europeans, the ubiquity of official corruption. Noting these matters earned Paz no small amount of trouble from the Mexican leadership, but it also brought him renown as a social critic. Paz, who went on to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, later voiced his disillusionment with all political systems--as the Mexican proverb has it, "all revolutions degenerate into governments"--but his call for democracy in this book has lately been reverberating throughout Mexico, making it timely once again.

From Library Journal
Originally issued in 1962, The...


A Perfect Red : Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire
Amy Butler Greenfield
0060522755
May 1, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"Elusive, expensive and invested with powerful symbolism, red cloth became the prize possession of the wealthy and well-born," Greenfield writes in her intricate, fully researched and stylishly written history of Europe's centuries-long clamor for cochineal, a dye capable of producing the "brightest, strongest red the Old World had ever seen." Discovered by Spanish conquistadors in Mexico in 1519, cochineal became one of Spain's top colonial commodities. Striving to maintain a trade monopoly, Spain fiercely guarded the secrets of cochineal cultivation in Mexico and only after centuries of speculation (was the red powder derived from plant or animal?) did 18th-century microscopes bring the mystery to light. Greenfield recounts the wild, clandestine attempts by adventurer naturalists to cultivate both the cochineal...


Life in Ancient Mesoamerica
Lynn Peppas
0778720691
Oct 2004
Paperback
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Mexico
Michael D. Coe
050028346X
July 2002
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Coe (anthropology, emeritus, Yale) and Koontz (art history, Univ. of Houston) have teamed to write an updated and expanded version of Coe's masterly work on Mexico's prehistory. All regions and major prehistoric civilizations of Mexico are covered with the exception of the Maya, whose geographical range extends beyond Mexico and who are examined in detail in a separate work by Coe. Information on a number of recent archaeological discoveries has been incorporated into this new edition, and a final chapter on visiting Mexico's archaeological sites has been added. The complexities of Mexico's ancient cultures are perceptively presented and interpreted. Coe and Koontz have done an excellent job of synthesizing a wealth of material and provide a comprehensive introduction to Mexico's prehistory that is both enjoyable...


Olmec World
Michael Coe
0810963116
March 30, 1996
Hardcover
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Almonte's Texas
Jack Jackson
0876112076
Sept 2005
Paperback
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Lords of Creation: The Origins of Sacred Maya Kingship
Virginia M. Fields, et al
1857593863
September 30, 2005
Hardcover
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Silver Masters of Mexico, Hector Aguilar and the Taller Borda: Hector Aguilar and the Taller Borda
Penny C. Morrill
088740961X
March 1997
Hardcover
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Book Description
Here is a magnificent presentation of the Mexican artisans and their creations displayed in 484 beautiful color photographs. The chapters present the master designers and silversmiths whose reputations have grown to international fame with an intimate look at one of the principal designers, Hctor Aguilar, and the personnel at this workshop. Valentin Vidaurreta, Los Castillo, William Spratling, Antonio Pineda, Hubert Harmon, Enrique Ledesma, and many more craftsmen are represented by their exquisite designs.

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