Book Finder
    
 
> History > Americas History > Native American History
 

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West
Dee Alexander Brown
0805066691
January 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
First published in 1970, this extraordinary book changed the way Americans think about the original inhabitants of their country. Beginning with the Long Walk of the Navajos in 1860 and ending 30 years later with the massacre of Sioux men, women, and children at Wounded Knee in South Dakota, it tells how the American Indians lost their land and lives to a dynamically expanding white society. During these three decades, America's population doubled from 31 million to 62 million. Again and again, promises made to the Indians fell victim to the ruthlessness and greed of settlers pushing westward to make new lives. The Indians were herded off their ancestral lands into ever-shrinking reservations, and were starved and killed if they resisted. It is a truism that "history is written by the victors"; for the first time, this book...


1491
Charles C. Mann
140004006X
Aug 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
1491 is not so much the story of a year, as of what that year stands for: the long-debated (and often-dismissed) question of what human civilization in the Americas was like before the Europeans crashed the party. The history books most Americans were (and still are) raised on describe the continents before Columbus as a vast, underused territory, sparsely populated by primitives whose cultures would inevitably bow before the advanced technologies of the Europeans. For decades, though, among the archaeologists, anthropologists, paleolinguists, and others whose discoveries Charles C. Mann brings together in 1491, different stories have been emerging. Among the revelations: the first Americans may not have come over the Bering land bridge around 12,000 B.C. but by boat along the Pacific coast 10 or even 20 thousand years earlier; the Americas...


The Catawba Indian Nation of the Carolinas
Thomas Blumer
0738517062
Oct 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The Catawba Indians are aboriginal to South Carolina, and their pottery tradition may be traced to 2,400 B.C. When Hernando de Soto visited the Catawba Nation (then Cofitachique) in 1540, he found a sophisticated Mississippian Culture. After the founding of Charleston in 1670, the Catawba population declined. Throughout subsequent demographic stress, the Catawba supported themselves by making and peddling pottery. They have the only surviving Native American pottery tradition east of the Mississippi. Without pottery, there would be no Catawba Indian Nation today.

About the Author
Thomas Blumer began his work among the Catawba in 1970. He has devoted much of his professional career to helping them save and revive their culture. From 1979 to 1993, he served as Catawba historian...


Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
James W. Loewen
0684818868
January 1995
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Sociology professor Loewen lambastes history textbooks as both too inaccurate and too bland to engage students. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
When textbook gaffes make news, as with the tome that explained that the Korean War ended when Truman dropped the atom bomb, the expeditious remedy would be to fire the editor. Loewen would rather hire a new team of authors bent on the pursuit of context instead of factoids. In Loewen's ideal text, events and people illuminating the multicultural holy trinity of race, gender, and social class would predominate over the fixation on heroes and acts of government. Such is the mood adopted throughout this critique of 12 American history texts in current use. Vetting 10 topics they commonly address--from...


The Divided Ground : Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution
Alan Taylor
0679454713
February 21, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The study of borderlands is hot; Pulitzer and Bancroft prize–winning historian Taylor (William Cooper's Town) offers a rich, sprawling history focusing on the Iroquois Six Nations of New York and Upper Canada during the era of the American Revolution. Taylor examines Indians' wise but unsuccessful attempts to hold onto their land as colonists encroached on it. One of Taylor's great insights is that historians have taken at face value what European settlers said about the "preemption rights" by which colonists and imperial governments claimed Indian territory. Taylor recovers Indians' reactions to those "rights." Many Indian leaders, recognizing that they couldn't reverse European settlement, tried to at least dictate how that settlement would unfold—they wished to lease, rather than sell, their land,...


Oh What a Slaughter
Larry McMurtry
074325077X
Nov 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist McMurtry (Lonesome Dove) recounts six Western frontier massacres in this meandering mixture of memoir, literary criticism, jeremiad and history. "In most cases," McMurtry acknowledges, "the only undisputed fact about a given massacre is the date on which it occurred." Rightly enough, such disputes don't keep him from approaching these subjects with strong opinions. "Whites killed whites" at Mountain Meadows (1857); "a camp of one hundred percent peaceful Indians" was attacked at Sand Creek (1864). At Marias River (1870), Blackfeet Indians "dying anyway" of smallpox were slaughtered, and at Camp Grant (1871) "all the people killed—excepting one old man and a 'well-grown' boy—were women and children." McMurtry's easygoing voice and hop-and-skip pace leave...


US History I: 1492-1865 SparkCharts (SparkNotes History and Social Sciences Series)
SparkNotes Editors
1586636499
September 2002
Paperback
·
 


Eagle Blue : A Team, A Tribe, and a High School Basketball Team in Arctic Alaska
Michael D'Orso
1582346232
March 7, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Eight miles above the Arctic Circle, there's a village with no roads leading to it, but a high school basketball tradition that lights up winter's darkness and a team of native Alaskan boys who know "no quit." D'Orso (coauthor of Like No Other Time with Tom Daschle) follows the Fort Yukon Eagles through their 2005 season to the state championship, shifting between a mesmerizing narrative and the thoughts of the players, their coach and their fans. What emerges is more than a sports story; it's a striking portrait of a community consisting of a traditional culture bombarded with modernity, where alcoholism, domestic violence and school dropout rates run wild. One player compares Fort Yukon to a bucket of crabs: "If one crab gets a claw-hold on the edge... and starts to pull itself out, the...


Everything You've Been Taught Is Wrong: Fact, Fiction, and Lies in American History: 14 Lectures (Portable Professor Series)
James W. Loewen
0760770328
May 2005
Compact Disc
·
 


Love and Hate in Jamestown
David A. Price
1400031729
Jan 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This sparkling book retells a beloved tale in modern terms. Journalist Price's subtitle suggests that the book might be only about John Smith and Pocahontas-who "crossed into one another's cultures more than any other Englishman or native woman had done"-as well as about Pocahontas's eventual husband, John Rolfe. Fortunately, the book ranges more widely than that. Price relates the entire riveting story of the founding of Virginia. Smith is of course at the center of the tale, because rarely did a colonial leader so bountifully combine experience, insight, vision, strength of character and leadership skills to overcome extraordinary odds. But no one will come away from this work without heightened admiration also for the natives, especially Chief Powhatan, and greater knowledge of the introduction of a third...


One Nation Under God: The History of Prayer in America
James P. Moore
0385504039
November 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The simple contention of this fascinating study is that prayer has always been intertwined with America's cultural life. Moore, who teaches at McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, casts a broad net, beginning with Native American prayers before European colonization and culminating with the prayers of Americans after 9/11. He attends not only to prayers said around tables and in houses of worship but also to the way that the arts contribute to prayer: in the 19th century, artists like Thomas Cole penned prayers in art journals, and 20th-century Jewish composer Leonard Bernstein wrote a symphony that meditated on the Jewish kaddish. Indeed, Moore has really written a history of religion in America told through the lens of prayer; for example, his discussion of Shaker prayer is embedded in a...


The Argumentative Indian: Writings on Indian Culture, History and Identity
Amartya Sen
0374105839
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
As India's multicultural society confronts violent sectarianism at home and a range of destabilizing forces internationally, these illuminating essays from Nobel Prize–winning economist Sen (most of which began as articles or lectures over the past decade) offer a timely and cogent examination of the country's long history of heterodoxy and public discourse. With sparkling erudition and crisp prose, Sen reminds readers of a capacious cultural legacy that has nourished a plethora of religious communities (including Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Parsee, Sikh and Baha'i), as well as a venerable line of atheist and materialist thought, while fostering ancient advances in science and mathematics, and inclusive theories of governance. Challenging the notion of the West as sole originator of...


Where Custer Fell: Photographs Of The Little Bighorn Battlefield Then And Now
James S. Brust, et al
0806136669
October 31, 2005
Hardcover
·
 


The Frontiersmen
Allan W. Eckert
0945084919
May 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River, victims of Indians who claimed the vast virgin territory and strove to turn back the growing tide of whites. These frontiersmen are the subjects of Allan Eckert's dramatic history. Against the background of such names as George Rogers Clark, Daniel Boone, Arthur St. Clair, Anthony Wayne, Simon Girty and William Henry Harrison, Eckert has recreated the life of one of...


The War That Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War
Fred Anderson
0670034541
December 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The author of the award-winning, scholarly account of the French and Indian War Crucible of War (2000) offers a scaled-down, popular version of that history in this companion volume to the January 2006 PBS documentary. It is an excellent introduction to a conflict that most Americans know little about, and that Winston Churchill called the first worldwide war. Anderson focuses on the North American theater, the outcome of which he claims "transformed the colonists' world forever" and, in effect, "made America." He shows how the conflict encouraged colonials "to conceive of themselves as equal partners in the [British] empire," a concept that Britain did not share and that led inexorably to postwar strife and revolution. In a departure from earlier accounts, Anderson gives unprecedented coverage to the role of...


The Scratch of a Pen : 1763 and the Transformation of North America (Pivotal Moments in American History)
Colin G. Calloway
0195300718
May 1, 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Dartmouth historian Calloway (author of the outstanding One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark) tells a spellbinding tale of a year in American history. In 1763, with the peace treaty that ended the French and Indian War, France and Spain handed over all the territory east of the Mississippi, as well as Canada, to the British. In this one stroke, settlers both on the East Coast and on the frontier came under British rule. Calloway's enthralling chronicle follows the lives of settlers, Indians and immigrants as this new British rule affected them. He demonstrates convincingly that the seeds of the American Revolution were planted in 1763, as a near-bankrupt Britain began to impose heavy "taxation without representation." The year brought bloody skirmishes...


The Journey of Crazy Horse
Joseph M. Marshall, III
0670033553
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In one of the first Penguin Lives biographies (1999's Crazy Horse), novelist Larry McMurtry drew on what scant facts he had to craft a brief and rather novelistic look at the legendary Lakota warrior. Here, Lakota author Marshall (The Lakota Way; Winter of the Holy Iron) draws on a rich Native American oral tradition to carefully and lovingly "unfold the life of Crazy Horse as a storyteller would." The result is a vivid, haunting biography that acknowledges the author's boyhood hero worship but avoids hagiography. Raised on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, Marshall recalls hearing his grandfather share stories of battles fought 75 years earlier against "Long Hair," the Lakota name for Gen. George Custer, vanquished at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Marshall reveals Crazy Horse as loyal son, spurned lover,...


The Last of the Mohicans (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593083351
November 2004
Hardcover
·
 


Chief Joseph & the Flight of the Nez Perce
Kent Nerburn
0060513012
Nov 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Nerburn (Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder) brings balanced passion to this popular history of the man best known for his sad speech signaling his tribe's surrender at the end of an 1,800-mile retreat from their homeland in Oregon: "I will fight no more forever." Nerburn's novelistic chronicle moves from the kind welcome Lewis and Clark receive from the Nez Percé in 1805 to General O.O. Howard's May 1877 order for the tribespeople to move onto a reservation in Idaho within 30 days. The author follows chiefs Joseph, Ollokot, Looking Glass and White Bird through their armed resistance to Howard's order, their torturous six-month flight toward Canada and their final surrender to U.S. forces just 50 miles away from the Canadian border. Subsequently relocated to several reservations,...


The Traditional Bowyer's Bible, Volume 2
Jim Hamm (Editor)
1585740861
March 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Released in 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively, this trio provides a remarkably in-depth analysis of the bow from its construction to its correct use. Numerous types of bows and arrows from all over the world are discussed by leading experts in the field. The emphasis here is on the history of these weapons and methods for building them from scratch, just as they were made before the advent of firearms. Though this might not find a huge audience, it is nonetheless an excellent series. Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Gray's Sporting Journal
The knowledge, experience and craftsmanship of the contributors are tributes to one of the great primitive hunting arts.

See all Editorial Reviews


Native Americans (Discoveries Series)
Lorann Pendleton (Editor)
0760746338
August 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Gr 5-8--Like the successful ``Eyewitness'' books, this series has a large format, captionlike texts, and an extravagant museum of illustrations. Large fold-out pages illustrate big ideas, e.g., the burial procession of a pharaoh. Each book tackles a broad subject, but glossaries, indexes, time lines, and maps help unify the information. Small boxes scattered throughout are obviously meant to capture readers' attention, but they sometimes backfire, as when the facts they provide are too mundane or obscure for the intended audience. Ancient Egypt makes a broad sweep of the history of the land of the Nile, hitting on the standard topics, but also focusing on the daily life of ancient Egyptians. The illustrations are especially good here. Native Americans lumps Indian cultures together and, by doing so, is able...


A Sorrow in Our Hearts
Allan W. Eckert
055356174X
Feb 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Though there are many biographies of the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh (1768-1813), this effort by historical novelist Eckert ( The Frontiersman ) may spark new interest--and controversy--with its "hidden dialogue" technique. After more than 25 years of research, the author felt free to recreate Tecumseh's conversations and thoughts in what proves to be an entertaining blend of fact and fiction. The orator and organizer's life was shaped by his tribe's tragic confrontation with westward-moving whites, who encroached on Native American lands along the Ohio River valley. His long struggle against this dispossession led Tecumseh to create a historic confederacy of tribes, but this crowning achievement was destroyed by his own brother at Tippecanoe in 1811. Eckert's dialogue is clunky, yet his colorful evocation of...


1491
Charles C. Mann
1565119789
Sept 2005
Audio Compact Disc - Abridged
·
 
Book Review
1491 is not so much the story of a year, as of what that year stands for: the long-debated (and often-dismissed) question of what human civilization in the Americas was like before the Europeans crashed the party. The history books most Americans were (and still are) raised on describe the continents before Columbus as a vast, underused territory, sparsely populated by primitives whose cultures would inevitably bow before the advanced technologies of the Europeans. For decades, though, among the archaeologists, anthropologists, paleolinguists, and others whose discoveries Charles C. Mann brings together in 1491, different stories have been emerging. Among the revelations: the first Americans may not have come over the Bering land bridge around 12,000 B.C. but by boat along the Pacific coast 10 or even 20 thousand years...


Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West
Dee Alexander Brown
0805066349
January 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
First published in 1970, this extraordinary book changed the way Americans think about the original inhabitants of their country. Beginning with the Long Walk of the Navajos in 1860 and ending 30 years later with the massacre of Sioux men, women, and children at Wounded Knee in South Dakota, it tells how the American Indians lost their land and lives to a dynamically expanding white society. During these three decades, America's population doubled from 31 million to 62 million. Again and again, promises made to the Indians fell victim to the ruthlessness and greed of settlers pushing westward to make new lives. The Indians were herded off their ancestral lands into ever-shrinking reservations, and were starved and killed if they resisted. It is a truism that "history is written by the victors"; for the first time, this book...


American Holocaust : The Conquest of the New World
David E. Stannard
0195085574
November 18, 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Stannard (history, Univ. of Hawaii-Manoa), whose previous works include Shrinking History: On Freud and the Failure of Psychohistory ( LJ 6/1/80) and Before the Horror: The Population of Hawaii on the Eve of Western Contact (Univ. of Hawaii Pr., 1989), turns his attention to the devastating impact of the European intrusion into the New World. He argues that with more than 100 million people the Americas were not the unpopulated open spaces so often described and notes the squalor and disease that dominated Europe in contrast to the relative peace and harmony that prevailed in the New World. The arrival of the Spanish and other Europeans, he argues, brought about a demographic disaster of incredible proportions--the largest genocide in history--as a result of disease and depredation, as well as through enslavement...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.