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The Wretched of the Earth
Frantz Fanon
0802150837


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Book Review
Frantz Fanon (1925-61) was a Martinique-born black psychiatrist and anticolonialist intellectual; The Wretched of the Earth is considered by many to be one of the canonical books on the worldwide black liberation struggles of the 1960s. Within a Marxist framework, using a cutting and nonsentimental writing style, Fanon draws upon his horrific experiences working in Algeria during its war of independence against France. He addresses the role of violence in decolonization and the challenges of political organization and the class collisions and questions of cultural hegemony in the creation and maintenance of a new country's national consciousness. As Fanon eloquently writes, "[T]he unpreparedness of the educated classes, the lack of practical links between them and the mass of the people, their laziness, and, let it be...


History and the Culture of Nationalism in Algeria
James McDougall
0521843731
July 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Colonialism denied Algeria its own history; nationalism reinvented it. James McDougall charts the creation of that history through colonialism to independence, exploring the struggle to define Algeria's past and determine the meaning of its nationhood. Through local histories, he analyses the relationship between history, Islamic culture and nationalism in Algeria. He confronts prevailing notions that nationalism emancipated Algerian history, and that Algeria's past has somehow determined its present, violence breeding violence, tragedy repeating itself. Instead, he argues, nationalism was a new kind of domination, in which multiple memories and possible futures were effaced. But the histories hidden by nationalism remain below the surface, and can be recovered to create alternative visions for the future. This is an...


My Battle of Algiers : A Memoir
Ted Morgan
0060852240
February 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In this candid, powerfully wrought memoir, Pulitzer Prize–winner Morgan (Churchill; Maugham; Reds) recalls his service as a young officer in France's bitter war in Algeria. A native of France, Morgan was working as a journalist in the United States in the mid-1950s when he received his conscription notice. Following a brief posting to a regiment in the Algerian countryside, he was transferred to Algiers, arriving just in time for the Battle of Algiers, which featured history's first "systematic use of urban terrorism." Placing crude bombs at bus stops, cafes and soccer stadiums, the rebels hoped to "create a climate of insecurity" among the French and to invite reprisals that would turn "moderate Arabs into rebels." The French responded by using torture to extract intelligence. "Torture...


Algeria, 1830-2000
Benjamin Stora
0801437156
June 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
A particularly vicious and bloody civil war has racked Algeria for a decade. Amnesty International notes that since 1992, in a population of 28 million, 80,000 people have been reported killed, and the actual total is almost certainly higher. This terrible war overshadows Algeria's long and complex history and its prominence on the world economic stage--second in size among African nations, Algeria has the longest Mediterranean coastline and contains the world's fifth-largest natural gas reserves. Algeria, 1830-2000 is a comprehensive narrative history of the country. Benjamin Stora, widely recognized as the leading expert on Algeria, presents the story of this turbulent area from the start of formal French colonialism in the early nineteenth century, through the prolonged war for independence in the latter 1950s, to...


Augustine : A New Biography
James J. O'Donnell
0060535377
April 1, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
O'Donnell, provost at Georgetown University and editor of the definitive edition of Augustine's Confessions, is admirably qualified to chronicle the life of the man who wrote history's most famous autobiography. But in this book, suffused with the methods (though thankfully not the tortured vocabulary) of postmodern critical suspicion, the Confessions is more hindrance than help at seeing the "many Augustines" who have been lost behind Augustine's own self-presentation. The Augustines that O'Donnell sketches include the aspiring social climber who transferred his ambitions from society to church; the bitter and dogged polemicist; and "Don Quixote of Hippo," whose "fantasy world of earliest Christianity has come eerily to be real." O'Donnell's pace is quick, his writing is sharp and there are lively and...


Algeria, 1830-2000
Benjamin Stora
0801489164
Mar 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
A particularly vicious and bloody civil war has racked Algeria for a decade. Amnesty International notes that since 1992, in a population of 28 million, 80,000 people have been reported killed, and the actual total is almost certainly higher. This terrible war overshadows Algeria's long and complex history and its prominence on the world economic stage--second in size among African nations, Algeria has the longest Mediterranean coastline and contains the world's fifth-largest natural gas reserves. Algeria, 1830-2000 is a comprehensive narrative history of the country. Benjamin Stora, widely recognized as the leading expert on Algeria, presents the story of this turbulent area from the start of formal French colonialism in the early nineteenth century, through the prolonged war for independence in the latter 1950s, to...


France and Algeria
Phillip C. Naylor
0813018013
Dec 2000
Hardcover
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Empires of Sand
David Ball
0440236681
March 6, 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
What a find! David Ball's first novel packs the wallop of a good old-fashioned adventure movie, with historic sweep to please any James Michener fan. The action starts with a wounded wild boar's attack on two French boys (convincingly told from the points of view of the boar, the boys--Paul and Moussa--the terrified mom, and an evil bishop who watches and prevents his coachman from shooting the beast). The pace never slackens as the scenes flash past: invasion and class war in the streets and underground quarryways of Paris during the 1870 siege, moonlit sneak attacks in the desert the Arabs call "the Land of Thirst and Fear," and an epic French attempt to drive a railroad through the Sahara--a mad plan opposed by the dunes and their no less implacable inhabitants, the Tuareg.

The Tuareg are the coolest--they're known...



Islamist Challenge in Algeria
Michael Willis
0814793290
Mar 1999
Paperback
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The Monks of Tibhirine : Faith, Love, and Terror in Algeria
John Kiser
0312253176


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Book Review
Few Americans heard about it, but the story gripped Europe (and especially France) during the summer of 1996: The mysterious kidnapping and murder of seven Trappist monks living in the Algerian village of Tibhirine at their monastery of Notre-Dame de l'Atlas. John W. Kiser III tells their story, or at least what parts of it can be known; much of what happened to them remains unclear, including the motives of their captors. Parts of The Monks of Tibhirine are grim, but this is an unavoidable fact of the case. The monks' bodies, for instance, never have been found--except for their heads. Kiser describes the scene: "The monks' desiccated faces, hollow eye sockets, and exposed teeth made them look like mummies." (Apparently they had been buried, then disinterred.) Readers looking for a nonfiction thriller won't find...


The Confessions (Vintage Spiritual Classics)
St. Augustine, Patricia Hampl (Preface)
0375700218
December 29, 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
Augustine's Confessions is arguably the first, and unequivocally the most influential, religious autobiography in the Christian tradition. Augustine (who was a hard-core hedonist before his sudden conversion) writes about faith with the reckless abandon of a lover; his descriptions of friendship are so beautiful they'll bring tears to your eyes; and his tributes to his mother, Monica, cast eternally fresh light on the unofficial authority of women in the early Church. --Michael Joseph Gross

From Library Journal
The latest volume in the series "Augustine for the Twenty-First Century," which will offer the first complete translation of all of Augustine's works into English, adds yet another vision of the Confessions to the many already available. The fourth-century bishop of Hippo in...


Modern Algeria
Charles Robert Ageron
0865432678
Apr 1992
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French


The Conquest of the Sahara
Douglas Porch
0374128790
June 22, 2005
Paperback
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Review
Praise for The Conquest of the Sahara:

"The Conquest of the Sahara is almost everything a book should be-an adornment for your home, a blitz of information for your brain, a diversion and a hoot, and, finally, balm for your soul." --The Los Angeles Times

"A bravura account...Readers with a taste for exotic popular history will savor Porch's wry sense of irony." -- Newsweek

"In this admirable book, Douglas Porch sets the record straight." --The Washington Post Book World

"Porch is knowledgeable. . .and a fine writer with a dramatic style . . .[he] has done a superb job." --The Boston Globe

"[Porch] presents a vivid blow-by-blow account of how this arid, inhospitable land was penetrated at a terrible cost." --The San Francisco Chronicle


The Battle of the Casbah : Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Algeria 1955-1957
General Paul Aussaresses
192963112X
August 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
No French army officer had ever spoken out in such detail. Many in the goverment, including Francois Mitterrand the future president of France knew and approved of tortured and summary executions in Alegia. This book is particulary relevant to the current national debate on terrorism.

About the Author
General Paul Aussaresses was a career French army intelligence officer with an excellent military record during World War II. He was dispatched to eastern Algeria in 1955 where he and his unit fought the rebels of the FLN. He retired after having served a


The End of Barbary Terror : America's 1815 War against the Pirates of North Africa
Frederick C. Leiner
0195189949
May 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This unevenly paced military history gives an exhaustive portrait of the little-known war waged by the United States to stop the enslaving of American sailors by north African pirates. For centuries prior to the 1815 war, the kingdoms of Algeria, Morocco, Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli engaged in a system of state-sponsored piracy, capturing ships cruising the Mediterranean (and even raiding coastal European villages) and using the captors-Leiner estimates as many as a million Europeans had been enslaved-for slave labor in their home ports. When American sailors became targets, the U.S. government could either pay the ransom or go to war. Leiner does an excellent job of describing the personalities involved and depicting the heated naval battles, but the U.S.'s decisive and nearly immediate success in a very short...


A Savage War of Peace : Algeria 1954-1962 (New York Review Books Classics)
Alistair Horne
1590172183
October 10, 2006
Paperback
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From AudioFile
This detailed chronicle of Algeria also provides abundant information about the Mediterranean conflict, religion, geography, and politics that affected it. Bill Kelsey's precise pronunciation and measured pace escort one through a long and pedantic session on North Africa, but with well-told asides and anecdotes maintain the listener's interest and attention. However, one disadvantage of learning history with audiobooks is the lack of maps and pictures. Horne's rather disorganized placement of events would benefit if the timeline in the back of the printed version were available. J.A.H. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
Although...

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