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Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
Alexandra Fuller
0375758992
March 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey through a white African girl's childhood. Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill." With a unique and subtle sensitivity to racial issues, Fuller describes her parents' racism and the wartime relationships between blacks and whites through a child's watchful eyes. Curfews and war, mosquitoes, land mines, ambushes and "an abundance of leopards" are the stuff of this childhood. "Dad has to go out into the bush... and find terrorists and fight them"; Mum saves the family from an Egyptian spitting...


Scribbling the Cat : Travels with an African Soldier [BARGAIN PRICE]
Alexandra Fuller
B000EPFVDC
May 3, 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
Thomas Wolfe's trusted axiom about not being able to go home again gets a compelling spin through the African veldt in Alexandra Fuller's Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier. Fuller (Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight : An African Childhood) journeys through modern Zambia, to battlefields in Zimbabwe and Mozambique with the scarred veteran of the Rhodesian Wars she identifies only as "K." Intrigued by the mysterious neighbor of her parent's Zambian fish farm and further enticed by her father's warning that "curiosity scribbled the cat" ("scribbling" is Afrikaans slang for "killing"), Fuller embarks on a journey that covers as much cratered psychic landscape as it does African bush country. Though she and "K" are both African by family roots rather than blood, she quickly discovers that 30 years of civil war...


The Kingdom of Kazembe
Giacomo Macola
3825859975
Feb 2003
Paperback
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History of the Catholic Church in Zambia 1895-1995
Hugo F. Hinfelaar
9982240269
June 2004
Paperback
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The Africa House : The True Story of an English Gentleman and His African Dream [BARGAIN PRICE]
Christina Lamb
B0009WUIBU
December 1, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Shiwa House is a magnificent, dilapidated rural estate in Zambia: built in the early years of the 20th century and resembling an English ancestral home, it was "completely... out of place in this remote corner of the African bush," writes Lamb, a journalist and author of the highly praised Sewing Circles of Herat. Her narrative, spanning more than half of the 20th century, not only reconstructs Shiwa House's original glory but details the intimate world of its builder, the egotistical Sir Stewart Gore-Browne, whom President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia honored with a state funeral in 1967. Concentrating on the evolution of Gore-Browne's nostalgically conceived estate in a remote outpost of British colonial Northern Rhodesia, Lamb evokes the beauty of the unspoiled countryside, its teeming wildlife, Gore-Browne's love...


Zambia
Timothy Holmes
0761406948
October 1997
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 5-8AProfuse, colorful photographs characterize this series. Unfortunately, the authors communicate a limited, superficial understanding of these countries. There are minor factual errors and some use of outdated race/language terms. More importantly, factors that have profoundly influenced the present are not explained. The BerbersAthe original inhabitants and majority population through most of Tunisia's historyAare not even mentioned until the Muslim conquest, and their centuries of gold/salt trade across the desert are not discussed. Brown does not explain that in Islamic belief, government and courts are supposed to rule according to religious teachings in order to create a society of order, compassion, and social justice. How, then, are readers to understand the passion of "Islamic...


Secrets of the Savanna
Mark James Owens, Cordelia Dykes Owens
0395893100
May 24, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. This is a fascinating look at the interplay of social and wildlife upheavals in Africa in the early 1990s and a worthy follow-up to the authors'Cry of the Kalahari. They describe traveling to the "remote and ruggedly beautiful" Luangwa Valley, in northeastern Zambia, to help save the North Luangwa National Park, where the elephant population had been decimated by poachers. The pair alternate writing chapters, with Mark presenting historical background to the region's human and animal problems and describing interactions with corrupt government security officers who eventually force the Owenses from Zambia. Although Mark's writing is vivid, Delia's chapters present the book's most moving scenes, featuring the day-to-day life of the animals and the social disruption caused by poaching: she sees...


Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier
Alexandra Fuller
0143035010
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Thomas Wolfe's trusted axiom about not being able to go home again gets a compelling spin through the African veldt in Alexandra Fuller's Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier. Fuller (Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight : An African Childhood) journeys through modern Zambia, to battlefields in Zimbabwe and Mozambique with the scarred veteran of the Rhodesian Wars she identifies only as "K." Intrigued by the mysterious neighbor of her parent's Zambian fish farm and further enticed by her father's warning that "curiosity scribbled the cat" ("scribbling" is Afrikaans slang for "killing"), Fuller embarks on a journey that covers as much cratered psychic landscape as it does African bush country. Though she and "K" are both African by family roots rather than blood, she quickly discovers that 30 years of civil war...


Basic Facts on Zambia
Mwelwa Musambachime
1420818082
September 30, 2005
Paperback
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Zambia
Anne M. Bliss (Editor)
0903450887
February 1985
Library Binding
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Spirit of Africa: The Healing Ministry of Archbishop Milingo of Zambia
Gerrie Ter Haar, Gerrie Ter Haar
0865432694
April 1992
Paperback
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From Library Journal
After being appointed Archbishop of Lusaka, Zambia, Milingo discovered that he had healing powers which enabled him to cast out evil spirits. The Vatican responded by removing him from Lusaka, but Milingo today continues his healing work in Rome. This book provides a carefully researched consideration of history and public perceptions of the affair (in Zambian as well as Western media), a philosophic investigation of Zambian belief in spirit possession, and a discussion of Milingo's being "free to do in the West what he was not free to do in Africa." Those interested in the Milingo affair, spirit possession, or Vatican politics will find this book thorough. Recommended for large academic libraries.Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Expectations of Modernity
James Ferguson
0520217020
October 1999
Paperback
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Independent (UK)
"[A] moving study." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
Once lauded as the wave of the African future, Zambia's economic boom in the 1960s and early 1970s was fueled by the export of copper and other primary materials. Since the mid-1970s, however, the urban economy has rapidly deteriorated, leaving workers scrambling to get by. Expectations of Modernity explores the social and cultural responses to this prolonged period of sharp economic decline. Focusing on the experiences of mineworkers in the Copperbelt region, James Ferguson traces the failure of standard narratives of urbanization and social change to make sense of the Copperbelt's recent history. He instead develops alternative analytic tools appropriate for...


History of the Tonga Chiefs and Their People in the District of Zambia
Santosh C. Saha
082042451X
August 1994
Hardcover
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Haven in Africa
Frank Shapiro
9652292850
November 1, 2002
Paperback
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Professor Miri Rubin, Department of History, Queen Mary- University of London
"...a sobering account. Frank Shapiro’s vivid narrative combines compassion, historical analysis, archival revelations and counter-factual thinking"

Karl A. Schleunes, Professor of History The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
"Here is a frustratingly sad story of an opportunity missed, partly out of malice and partly out of inattention..."

See all Editorial Reviews


Cutting Down Trees: Gender, Nutrition, and Agricultural Change in the Northern Province of Zambia, 1890-1990
Megan Vaughan
0435080903
December 1993
Textbook Paperback
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Review
“. . . this book might well be the text that sets a new and powerful standard for the writing of 20th-century African history in general and the social history of African agriculture in particular.”–Luise White, Emory University

Book Description
This major study traces detailed changes in the agricultural system of Zambia's Northern Province over a period of one hundred years.

See all Editorial Reviews


Law, Custom, and Social Order: The Colonial Experience in Malawi and Zambia (Classics of African Studies Series)
Martin Chanock
0325000166
June 5, 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
This book explores the historical formation during the colonial period of that part of African law know as customary law.


Casting with a Fragile Thread: A Story of Sisters and Africa
Wendy Kann
0805079564
May 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. When Rhodesia declared independence from Britain in 1965, five-year-old Kann, the daughter of white Africans, would entertain her father's tennis party guests by singing, "Rhodesia has sanctions, and I can't have Marmite on my toast!" In her 20s, Kann left what had become Zimbabwe for the U.S. Drawn back to Africa by the sudden death of one of her sisters (in a 1999 car crash in Zambia), Kann found herself reexamining her earlier life. Her alcoholic mother—"There should be lots of words to describe drunk mothers, like the Inuit have words for snow"—and her morose father had divorced early; the stepmother who raised the girls after their father's suicide was barely able to manage. The country itself had always been in a state of war; as Kann realized when she first met her American...


No Fixed Abode : A Jewish Odyssey to Africa
Peter Fraenkel
1850436266
April 16, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Peter Fraenkel here gives a vivid account of a childhood in a middle-class, non-observant Jewish family in Nazi Germany, forced to emigrate to Zambia (then Northern Rhodesia) in 1939. Here the contrast could hardly be greater, from persecuted Jew, to "enemy alien" in colonial Northern Rhodesia, to re-assimilation into the privileged colonial elite. Following education in Northern and Southern Rhodesia he worked for the Northern Rhodesian and later, Central Broadcasting Service. Here his pioneering work and support for racial equality in a deeply racist society connected with his earlier life--"no fixed abode" but in tune with humane liberalism.


Economic Crisis, Civil Society, and Democratization: The Case of Zambia
Julius Omozuanvbo Ihonvbere
0865435006
April 1996
Hardcover
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From the Back Cover
The transition from an authoritarian to an egalitarian form of government is a major paradigm shift for any society. When forces of opposition remain major players, however, the transition is guaranteed to be tumultuous. Thus, any democratizing African nation in which democracy-in any form-is still alive at the end of the its first term is well worth studying, even if only for the light it may shed on the challenges of democratization in post-Cold War Africa. In this, "the first major book on post-UNIP Zambia," the author chronicles the efforts of the Movement for Multiparty Democracy (MMD) in Zambia since 1991 to consolidate democracy and rebuild a civil society-despite fierce competition by the ousted United National Independence Party (UNIP) and ongoing efforts at intervention by Western financial...


Foreign Aid, Debt and Growth in Zambia: Research Report 112
Per-Ake Andersson
9171064621
February 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
A study which discusses the structural problems in Zambia and the policies of adjustment that have been tried. It also analyses the impact of various strategies with regard to external resource transfers. The results show that the scope for growth is highly dependent on the tightness of the external resource constraint, and that debt service tends to dominate the policy-making.

About the Author
Arne Bigsten is Professor of Development Economics at Göteborg University.


Zambia: Between Two Worlds (Profiles : Nations of Contemporary Africa)
Marcia Burdette
0865316171


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