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Scribbling the Cat : Travels with an African Soldier [BARGAIN PRICE]
Alexandra Fuller
B000EPFVDC
May 3, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Thomas Wolfe's trusted axiom about not being able to go home again gets a compelling spin through the African veldt in Alexandra Fuller's Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier. Fuller (Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight : An African Childhood) journeys through modern Zambia, to battlefields in Zimbabwe and Mozambique with the scarred veteran of the Rhodesian Wars she identifies only as "K." Intrigued by the mysterious neighbor of her parent's Zambian fish farm and further enticed by her father's warning that "curiosity scribbled the cat" ("scribbling" is Afrikaans slang for "killing"), Fuller embarks on a journey that covers as much cratered psychic landscape as it does African bush country. Though she and "K" are both African by family roots rather than blood, she quickly discovers that 30 years of civil war...


Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
Alexandra Fuller
0375758992
March 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey through a white African girl's childhood. Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill." With a unique and subtle sensitivity to racial issues, Fuller describes her parents' racism and the wartime relationships between blacks and whites through a child's watchful eyes. Curfews and war, mosquitoes, land mines, ambushes and "an abundance of leopards" are the stuff of this childhood. "Dad has to go out into the bush... and find terrorists and fight them"; Mum saves the family from an Egyptian spitting...


Voices from the Rocks
Terence Ranger
025321288X
Apr 1999
Paperback
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Book Description
Occupied by humanity for some 40,000 years, the Matopos Hills in Zimbabwe have become the scene of symbolic, ideological and armed conflict over the last hundred years. Voices from the Rocks is about landscape, religion, conservation, political symbolism, and war in the Matopos Hills - not simply the geography of the National Park there, which is seen by most visitors as a "wild place." This book reinstates culture and history into nature.

About the Author
Terence Ranger is Emeritus Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, Oxford University


Our Votes, Our Guns: Robert Mugabe and the Tragedy of Zimbabwe
Martin Meredith
158648186X
May 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
In 1980, Zimbabwe was the great hope of Africa, a place where blacks were supposed to realize their postcolonial destinies under the enlightened leadership of Robert Mugabe. But now the country formerly known as Rhodesia is an international basket case with a wrecked economy and a dim future. In this disturbing book by Martin Meredith, a British journalist with extensive experience in southern Africa, Mugabe transforms into a villain. "Year by year, he acquired ever greater power, ruling the country through a vast system of patronage, favoring loyal aides and cronies with government positions and contracts and ignoring the spreading blight of corruption," writes Meredith. "Power for Mugabe was not a means to an end, but the end itself." His reign has been so wretched, in fact, that some of the most sympathetic people in Our...


Peasants, Traders, & Wives
Elizabeth Schmidt
0435080660
July 1992
Paperback
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Review
“. . . women's voices are beginning at last to be heard more loudly and clearly.”–African Affairs

Book Description
Dr. Schmidt argues that women were central to the formation of African peasantries in Rhodesia.

See all Editorial Reviews


Zimbabwe
Sean Sheehan
0761417060
January 2004
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 7-10-- Striking full-color photographs provide lively images of Africa's diversity. The books do not live up to their visual promise, however. Their organization is so fragmented that readers are unlikely to develop an understanding of why these people have made the choices that they have and live as they do. The maps are inadequate. Especially in Nigeria and Kenya , the authors seem to have depended on older books and present an oddly colonial perspective. Such connotations emerge in the focus on comparing "tribes"; overemphasis on exotic small rural groups such as the Masai; and enumeration of customs strange to Americans (e.g., "witch doctors," Ibo twin killing) without adequate explanation. Classifying "tribes" also creates confusion and inaccuracies. In Nigeria , the Ibo are described both as a...


Most Promising Weed
Steven C. Rubert
0896802035
Oct 1998
Paperback
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Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
Alexandra Fuller
0375507507


·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey through a white African girl's childhood. Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill." With a unique and subtle sensitivity to racial issues, Fuller describes her parents' racism and the wartime relationships between blacks and whites through a child's watchful eyes. Curfews and war, mosquitoes, land mines, ambushes and "an abundance of leopards" are the stuff of this childhood. "Dad has to go out into the bush... and find terrorists and fight them"; Mum saves the family from an Egyptian spitting...


Guns and Rain: Guerillas and Spirit Mediums in Zimbabwe
David Lan
0520055896
January 1985
Textbook Paperback
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The Historical Dimensions Of Human Rights In Zimbabwe
Terence O. Ranger
1779200013
June 1905
Paperback
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Journey To The Vanished City
Tudor Parfitt
0375724540
April 4, 2000
Paperback
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Review
"Parfitt...is a British Indiana Jones seeking the lost tribes of Israel."  -The Wall Street Journal

"Lucidly written and exhibiting all the craftsmanship of a first-rate detective novel."  -Daily Telegraph (London)

"Magical...enchanting...Resembles a novel by Graham Greene not only in its exotic settings and characters, but in its insight and wisdom, too." --Los Angeles Times

Review
"Parfitt...is a British Indiana Jones seeking the lost tribes of Israel."  -The Wall Street Journal

"Lucidly written and exhibiting all the craftsmanship of a first-rate detective novel."  -Daily Telegraph (London)

"Magical...enchanting...Resembles a novel by Graham Greene not...


Zimbabwe
Patricia Barnes Svarney
0791047539
October 1997
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-Solid introductions to two African countries. Both titles present basic facts on history, geography, politics, government, economy, natural resources, education, people, and culture. In each book, a "Facts at a Glance" section lists important statistics, key exports, major religions, etc.; "History at a Glance" offers a timeline of important events. Over three dozen mediocre-quality black-and-white photos illustrate each title. In addition, each one has a center section of about a dozen quality full-color photographs. Both titles suffer from dense text and the omission of some important information. For instance, the brutality of colonial rule and its aftereffects are not dealt with, and there is no mention of the heroic anti-colonial, anti-imperialist struggle waged by people of both countries. There...


Nyanga
Robert Soper
187256612X
Dec 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
The stone ruins of the Nyanga area of eastern Zimbabwe have intrigued observers since they were first reported to the outside world at the end of the 19th century. The early fanciful speculations about their meaning have been gradually tempered over the years by the findings of systematic archaeological research, culminating in the project recently completed by the British Institute in Eastern Africa and the University of Zimbabwe. The first stages of the Nyanga complex were established between the 13th and 14th centuries AD, on some of the highest peaks of the region. Subsequent stages saw a gradual expansion downhill, with the construction of multiple stone terraces, cattle pens, and settlements. In this book, Robert Soper and his colleagues set out the accumulated historical and archaeological evidence for the...


The Battle for Zimbabwe: The Final Countdown
Geoff Hill
1868726525
May 2005
Hardcover
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Annabel Hughes, Washington Times
...shines a light on a country that is being systematically destroyed by a dictatorial regime...

Book Description
Geoff Hill takes the reader inside Robert Mugabe's party, ZANU-PF, and the opposition Movement for Democratic Change. The author has met with members of both parties who have been prepared to talk candidly with him, giving him behind-the-scenes information. The book considers the role of critics and observers - the role and treatment of the press within Zimbabwe, and the often contradictory responses to Mugabe from the international community. It also looks at the lives of ordinary Zimbabweans living in a collapsing economy. Finally, it considers Zimbabwe's future - the challenge that lies ahead to rebuild the country.


Tales of the Nation
Lene Bull-Christiansen
9171065393
June 2005
Paperback
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About the Author
Lene Bull-Christiansen holds an MA in International Development Studies and Cultural Encounters from Roskilde University in Denmark. Her research interests include nationalism, gender, political culture, and postcolonial theory.


Casting with a Fragile Thread: A Story of Sisters and Africa
Wendy Kann
0805079564
May 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. When Rhodesia declared independence from Britain in 1965, five-year-old Kann, the daughter of white Africans, would entertain her father's tennis party guests by singing, "Rhodesia has sanctions, and I can't have Marmite on my toast!" In her 20s, Kann left what had become Zimbabwe for the U.S. Drawn back to Africa by the sudden death of one of her sisters (in a 1999 car crash in Zambia), Kann found herself reexamining her earlier life. Her alcoholic mother—"There should be lots of words to describe drunk mothers, like the Inuit have words for snow"—and her morose father had divorced early; the stepmother who raised the girls after their father's suicide was barely able to manage. The country itself had always been in a state of war; as Kann realized when she first met her American...


The Collapse Of Zimbabwe In The Wake Of The 2000-2003 Land Reforms (Studies in African Economic and Social Development)
Craig Richardson
0773463666
October 2004
Hardcover
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Crisis of Governance: Zimbabwe
Jacob Chikuhwa
0875862845
April 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Chikuhwa chronicles Zimbabwe's bleak history since the nation (then Rhodesia) achieved independence from Great Britain in 1980. Born and raised in Zimbabwe, Chikuhwa devotes the first part of his analysis to his nation's vexed constitutional history. After outlining constitutions set up under British rule and then under a white minority government, the author focuses in detail on the 1979 "Lancaster House Constitution" of the Republic of Zimbabwe and how the new government, dominated by the Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front, or ZANU (PF), and headed by President Robert Mugabe, enacted radical constitutional amendments that gave Mugabe far-reaching presidential powers. Chikuhwa shows how Mugabe's government quickly adopted a Marxist-Leninist style of authoritarianism, and documents widespread...


Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier
Alexandra Fuller
0143035010
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Thomas Wolfe's trusted axiom about not being able to go home again gets a compelling spin through the African veldt in Alexandra Fuller's Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier. Fuller (Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight : An African Childhood) journeys through modern Zambia, to battlefields in Zimbabwe and Mozambique with the scarred veteran of the Rhodesian Wars she identifies only as "K." Intrigued by the mysterious neighbor of her parent's Zambian fish farm and further enticed by her father's warning that "curiosity scribbled the cat" ("scribbling" is Afrikaans slang for "killing"), Fuller embarks on a journey that covers as much cratered psychic landscape as it does African bush country. Though she and "K" are both African by family roots rather than blood, she quickly discovers that 30 years of civil war...


Re-living the Second Chimurenga: Memories from Zimbabwes Liberation Struggle
Fay King Chung, Preben Kaarsholm (Introduction)
9171065512
March 30, 2006
Paperback
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About the Author
Fay King Chung worked in the 1980s in various capacities in the Zimbabwean Ministry of Education, and eventually became Minister. She was Chief of the education cluster at UNICEF 1993-98, and was then the first Director UNESCO's International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa from 1998 to 2003.


From Enslavement to Environmentalism: Politics on a Southern African Frontier (Culture, Place, and Nature)
David Mcdermott Hughes
0295985909
April 30, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
From Enslavement to Environmentalismtakes a challenging ethnographic and historical look at the politics of ecodevelopment in the Zimbabwe-Mozambiqueborder zone. David Hughes argues that European colonization in southern Africa has profoundly reshaped rural politics and culture and continues to do so, as neoliberal developers commoditize the lands of African peasants in the name of conservation and economic progress. Hughes builds his engaging analysis around a sort of natural experiment: in the past, whites colonized British Zimbabwe but avoided Portuguese Mozambique almost entirely. In Zimbabwe, chiefdoms that had historically focused on controlling people began to follow the English example of consolidating political power by dividing and controlling land. Meanwhile, in Mozambique, Portugal perpetuated traditional...


Zimbabwe
Colin Stoneman
0861874544
June 1989
Hardcover
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Islands of White: Settler Society and Culture in Kenya and Southern Rhodesia, 1890-1939 (Duke University Center for International Studies publication)
Dane Keith Kennedy
0822307081


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Healing in the History of Christianity
Amanda Porterfield
0195157184
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Tell the story of healing throughout Christian history in under 250 pages;a daunting task? Absolutely. But Porterfield, a religion professor at Florida State University, pulls it off admirably. In her view, healing encompasses more than just dramatic miracles worked by Jesus or his followers. Learning to live with chronic pain can be seen as a form of healing, as can repentance and the experience of being forgiven. The early church frequently described Christ as a physician and suggested that spiritual healing could protect believers from physical illness. Christians nursed the sick in a conscious emulation of Christ's ministry. The medieval church developed the idea that the body parts of long-dead saints could heal, and icons were considered "vehicles of healing power." This book is boldly global in...

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