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Notes from My Travels: Visits with Refugees in Africa, Cambodia, Pakistan, and Ecuador
Angelina Jolie
0743470230
October 2003
Paperback
·
 
Review
Jane Goodall, Ph.D., CBEFounder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of PeaceAngelina is living proof of the power we all have -- every one of us -- to make a difference. I was deeply moved by her descriptions of individual refugees struggling to live with dignity and hope, and found her personal commitment to be an inspiration. Angelina's journals document her awakening as a humanitarian activist and I hope they will move readers to act. I look forward to my continued work with Angelina on behalf of the United Nations.

Book Description
Three years ago, award-winning actress Angelina Jolie took on a radically different role as a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Here are her memoirs from her journeys to Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Pakistan,...


France on the Mekong
John A. Tully
0761824316
Mar 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Based on largely unexploited archival sources, France on the Mekong is the first comprehensive history of the colonial era in Cambodia.


Angkor: Celestial Temples of the Khmer
Jon Ortner, et al
0789207184
December 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
An exquisitely illustrated history and exploration of Angkor, the world's most astonishing architectural treasure. Built between the ninth and the thirteenth centuries by a succession of twelve Khmer kings, Angkor spreads over 120 square miles in Southeast Asia and includes scores of major architectural sites. In 802, when construction began on Angkor Wat, with wealth from rice and trade, Jayavarman ll took the throne, initiating an unparalleled period of artistic and architectural achievement, exemplified in the fabled ruins of Angkor, center of the ancient empire. Among the amazing pyramid and mandala shaped shrines preserved in the jungles of Cambodia, is Angkor Wat, the world's largest temple, an extraordinarily complex structure filled with iconographic detail and religious symbolism. Perhaps because of the...


First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Loung Ung
0060931388
January 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Written in the present tense, First They Killed My Father will put you right in the midst of the action--action you'll wish had never happened. It's a tough read, but definitely a worthwhile one, and the author's personality and strength shine through on every page. Covering the years from 1975 to 1979, the story moves from the deaths of multiple family members to the forced separation of the survivors, leading ultimately to the reuniting of much of the family, followed by marriages and immigrations. The brutality seems unending--beatings, starvation, attempted rape, mental cruelty--and yet the narrator (a young girl) never stops fighting for escape and survival. Sad and courageous, her life and the lives of her young siblings provide quite a powerful example of how war can so deeply affect children--especially a war in...


A History of Cambodia
David Chandler
0813335116
Feb 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
This clear and concise volume provides a timely overview of Cambodia, a small but increasingly visible Southeast Asian nation. Hailed by the Journal of Asian Studies as an "original contribution, superior to any other existing work," the third edition of this acclaimed text has been completely revised and updated to include all-new material examining the death of Pol Pot and the collapse of the Khmer Rouge. In addition, Chandler examines the unstable but influential career of Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the bloody reign of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, and the relative calm that followed the Vietnamese invasion of 1979. This comprehensive general description and analysis of Cambodia will illuminate-for specialists and general readers alike-the history and contemporary politics of a country long misunderstood.


Pol Pot : Anatomy of a Nightmare (John MacRae Books)
Philip Short
0805066624
February 8, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Towards the beginning of this massive biography, Short cautions readers against dismissing the terror of Pol Pot's regime as the incomprehensible work of evil men. Instead, Short argues, the explanations for the Khmer Rouge regime, which resulted in the death of over one-fifth of Cambodia's population, or 1.5 million people, are "rooted in history." The book begins its search for these explanations in the early life of Saloth Sâr, a "mediocre student" whose political disengagement offered no hint of the ideological nightmare he would fashion under the name Pol Pot. As a student in Paris, Sâr's political philosophy slowly began to take shape, and the book deftly follows his political evolution abroad as a part of the "Cercle Marxiste" against the backdrop of the tumultuous history of Cambodia after the...


Terrify No More : Young Girls Held Captive and the Daring Undercover Operation to Win Their Freedom
Gary A. Haugen, Gregg Hunter
0849918383
January 7, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Haugen, president of the Christian humanitarian organization International Justice Mission, peoples this account of IJM's efforts to rescue young girls from forced prostitution in Svay Pak, Cambodia, with larger-than-life heroes and villains. Written with the aid of communications consultant Hunter, the story, played for all its terrible drama, tells of girls sold into sex slavery by their families or tricked into it by the promise of legitimate work. IJM members, posing as customers, infiltrated the brothels, interviewed the girls and later staged successful rescue operations. Haugen credits the success of his work to God ("I believe we all yearn for the joy that arrives... when we find our own active place in the struggle against evil and discover the transforming power of life the Divine has granted to mere...


Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
Loung Ung
0060733942
April 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In her second memoir, Ung picks up where her first, the National Book Award–winning First They Killed My Father, left off, with the author escaping a devastated Cambodia in 1980 at age 10 and flying to her new home in Vermont. Though she embraces her American life—which carries advantages ranging from having a closet of her own to getting a formal education and enjoying The Brady Bunch—she can never truly leave her Cambodian life behind. She and her eldest brother, with whom she escaped, left behind their three other siblings. This book is alternately heart-wrenching and heartwarming, as it follows the parallel lives of Loung Ung and her closest sister, Chou, during the 15 years it took for them to reunite. Loung effectively juxtaposes chapters about herself and her sister to...


History, Buddhism, and New Religious Movements in Cambodia
John Marston
0824826663
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 
David Chandler, Monash University
"A book of extraordinary breadth--from historical studies to chapters on the Khmer diaspora--that is unfailingly accessible and perceptive."

Book Description
This volume showcases some of the most current and exciting research being done on Cambodian religious ideas and practices by a new generation of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The different contributors examine in some manner the relationship between religion and the ideas and institutions that have given shape to Cambodia as a social and political body, or nation. Although they do not share the same approach to the idea of "nation," all are concerned with the processes of religion that give meaning to social interaction, which in some way includes "Cambodian" identity. Chapters touch on such...


History, Buddhism, and New Religious Movements in Cambodia
John Marston
0824828682
Oct 2004
Paperback
·
 
David Chandler, Monash University
"A book of extraordinary breadth--from historical studies to chapters on the Khmer diaspora--that is unfailingly accessible and perceptive." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
This volume showcases some of the most current and exciting research being done on Cambodian religious ideas and practices by a new generation of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The different contributors examine in some manner the relationship between religion and the ideas and institutions that have given shape to Cambodia as a social and political body, or nation. Although they do not share the same approach to the idea of "nation," all are concerned with the processes of religion that give meaning to social interaction, which in some way...


First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Loung Ung
0060856262
April 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Written in the present tense, First They Killed My Father will put you right in the midst of the action--action you'll wish had never happened. It's a tough read, but definitely a worthwhile one, and the author's personality and strength shine through on every page. Covering the years from 1975 to 1979, the story moves from the deaths of multiple family members to the forced separation of the survivors, leading ultimately to the reuniting of much of the family, followed by marriages and immigrations. The brutality seems unending--beatings, starvation, attempted rape, mental cruelty--and yet the narrator (a young girl) never stops fighting for escape and survival. Sad and courageous, her life and the lives of her young siblings provide quite a powerful example of how war can so deeply affect children--especially a war in...


Killing Fields, Living Fields
Peter Lewis (Foreword), Don Cormack
0825460026
June 30, 2001
Paperback
·
 
Review
Church Libraries : A compelling and inspiring story about the Cambodian church!

J. I. Packer
"This heartwrenching, heartwarming narrative prompts tears, prayers, praises, and hopes in turn. It is a long time since I read anything so poignant."

See all Editorial Reviews


Colonial Cambodia's Bad Frenchmen: The Rise of French Rule and the Life Story of Thomas Caraman, 1840-1887 (RoutledgeCurzon Studies in the Modern History of Asia)
Gregor Mueller (Editor)
0415355621
May 2006
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
At the same time a biography and a history of how Cambodia became colonized by the French in the nineteenth century, Cambodia's Bad Frenchmen offers a captivating account of a little-known period of colonial history. Drawing on new materials from French, Vietnamese and Cambodian archives, it reconstructs a time during which France struggled to give meaning and substance to its Protectorate over Cambodia. The book focuses on those sitting on the boundaries between the worlds of the colonizers and the colonized: indigenous interpreters, go-betweens, concubines and their métis children, and marginal Europeans who failed to fashion a proper colonial existence - mauvais colonists - notably Thomas Caraman. They all constituted a challenge to the colonial enterprise by muddling its social, cultural and racial...


The Ends of the Earth: From Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia: A Journey to the Frontiers of Anarchy
Robert D. Kaplan
0679751238
January 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
"The future here could be sadder than the present," writes Robert Kaplan in a chapter about the African nation of Sierra Leone. From Kaplan's perspective, the same could be said of virtually the entire Third World, which he spends the bulk of this book visiting and describing. Kaplan, an acclaimed foreign correspondent and author of Balkan Ghosts, is congenitally pessimistic about the developmental prospects of West Africa, the Nile Valley, and much of Asia. This traveler's tale offers dire warnings about overpopulation, environmental degradation, and social chaos. We should all hope that Kaplan's forecast is wrong, but we ignore him at our peril.

San Francisco Chronicle
Kaplan is a superb reporter, expertly weaving his precise, vivid observation of facts at hand into a larger...


Stay Alive, My Son
Pin Yathay
0671663941
October 15, 1988
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness
Simon Wiesenthal
0805210601
January 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Author Simon Weisenthal recalls his demoralizing life in a concentration camp and his envy of the dead Germans who have sunflowers marking their graves. At the time he assumed his grave would be a mass one, unmarked and forgotten. Then, one day, a dying Nazi soldier asks Weisenthal for forgiveness for his crimes against the Jews. What would you do? This important book and the provocative question it poses is birthing debates, symposiums, and college courses. The Dalai Lama, Harry Wu, Primo Levi, and others who have witnessed genocide and human tyranny answer Wiesenthal's ultimate question on forgiveness. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
In this 1976 volume, divided into two sections, Wiesenthal tackles the question of the...


The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79
Ben Kiernan
0300096496
October 1, 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
"I first visited Cambodia in 1975," Ben Kiernan writes. "None of the Cambodians I knew then survived the next four years." In The Pol Pot Regime, Kiernan presents the first definitive account of the four-year reign of terror known as "Democratic Kampuchea." Working very closely with Cambodian sources, including interviews with hundreds of survivors and the archived "confessions" extracted by the Khmer Rouge from political prisoners just before their execution, Kiernan depicts the horrific nature of Pol Pot and his thugs with chilling specificity, and his historical analysis makes a valuable contribution to understanding how they were able to come to power in the wake of the Vietnam War. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From...


Finding Moon
Tony Hillerman
0061092614
August 1996
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Location figures powerfully in Hillerman's newest novel, but it isn't the Southwest of his Navajo mysteries (Sacred Clowns, etc.), nor is this a Joe Leaphorn story. In April 1975, Moon Mathias, managing editor of a small-town Colorado newspaper, begins a redemptive journey that takes him first to Manila and then across the South China Sea to Cambodia, just as Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge begin their reign of terror. Moon's brother Ricky, owner of a helicopter transportation service based in Cambodia, has recently died in a jungle crash. Their mother receives word that Ricky's baby daughter is being smuggled out of Vietnam to the Philippines. After his mother has a heart attack in the Manila airport, Moon takes over her mission, but the child does not arrive. Finding and contacting Ricky's acquaintances, Moon...


Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
Loung Ung
0060733950
April 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In her second memoir, Ung picks up where her first, the National Book Award–winning First They Killed My Father, left off, with the author escaping a devastated Cambodia in 1980 at age 10 and flying to her new home in Vermont. Though she embraces her American life—which carries advantages ranging from having a closet of her own to getting a formal education and enjoying The Brady Bunch—she can never truly leave her Cambodian life behind. She and her eldest brother, with whom she escaped, left behind their three other siblings. This book is alternately heart-wrenching and heartwarming, as it follows the parallel lives of Loung Ung and her closest sister, Chou, during the 15 years it took for them to reunite. Loung effectively juxtaposes chapters about herself and her sister to...


WAR AND HOPE : THE CASE FOR CAM
Norodom Prince Sihanouk
0394511158
May 12, 1980
Hardcover
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English, French (translation)


The Indochina Chronicles: Travels in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam
Phil Karber
9812610367
August 25, 2005
Paperback
·
 
Richard Bernstein, Berlin Bureau Chief, New York Times
"Phil’s book is intimate, informed, colorful, and most of all, real, a marvelous tour... of the Southeast Asian landscape."

Kay Johnson, Vietnam correspondent, TIME magazine
"A rare blend of history, war remembrance and modern observation driven by a deep desire to understand..."

See all Editorial Reviews


Pol Pot: Anatomy of a Nightmare
Philip Short
0805080066
January 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Towards the beginning of this massive biography, Short cautions readers against dismissing the terror of Pol Pot's regime as the incomprehensible work of evil men. Instead, Short argues, the explanations for the Khmer Rouge regime, which resulted in the death of over one-fifth of Cambodia's population, or 1.5 million people, are "rooted in history." The book begins its search for these explanations in the early life of Saloth Sâr, a "mediocre student" whose political disengagement offered no hint of the ideological nightmare he would fashion under the name Pol Pot. As a student in Paris, Sâr's political philosophy slowly began to take shape, and the book deftly follows his political evolution abroad as a part of the "Cercle Marxiste" against the backdrop of the tumultuous history of Cambodia after the...


Voices from S-21: Terror and History in Pol Pot's Secret Prison
David P. Chandler
0520222474
December 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Chandler presents a grisly but lucid historical accounting of S-21, the secret prison where at least 14,000 people were interrogated, tortured, forced to confess to counterrevolutionary crimes and executed during the reign of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. This "anteroom to death," as Chandler labels it, was discovered by two Vietnamese photographers in the wake of the invasion that forced out the Khmer Rouge in January 1979. Drawn to the site by the smell of decomposing flesh, the men discovered the bodies of 50 recently murdered prisoners, an array of implements of torture and a vast abandoned archive of institutionally sanctioned torture and murder. (The area was immediately turned into a museum.) Chandler methodically reconstructs the history of S-21, working with both the archives discovered there and his own...


Children of Cambodia's Killing Fields: Memoirs by Survivors
Dith Pran, Kim DePaul (Editor)
0300078730
April 10, 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Dith Pran, the Cambodian photojournalist portrayed by Haing S. Ngor in The Killing Fields, compiled this collection of eyewitness accounts to the genocide perpetrated by Pol Pot's regime from 1975 to 1979. All of the survivors who recount their stories here were children when the Khmer Rouge took power, and the horrific images from a time when an estimated third of the Cambodian population died of disease, starvation, and execution remain fixed in their minds to this day.

The bleakness of evil made commonplace permeates these testaments. "There was a man who was friends with a woman, and they had a friendly chat under a tree," one woman writes. "Pol Pot saw them and accused them of having an affair... Pol Pot tied them up on a cross and then told everyone to watch the couple being questioned and hit. The...


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