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The Good, the Bad, and the Mad: Some Weird People in American History
E. Randall Floyd
0760766002
January 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
The quiet spinster who erupted one day in a blinding flash of violence, the brilliant scientist that was terrified of women wearing pearl earrings, the inexperienced pilot who took off from New York bound for Los Angeles and landed 27 hours later¿in Dublin! These are just a few of the many saints, sinners, hucksters, and oddballs you'll meet in The Good, The Bad & The Mad. In this compellingly off-beat peek into America's past, E. Randall Floyd examines a fascinating array of men and women who achieved fame, fortune, or notoriety because (or in spite of) their glaring peculiarities. Did you know that: Stonewall Jackson was as renowned for his odd personal habits as for his daring flank attacks? Conan the Barbarian author Robert Howard lived all his life with his mother and committed suicide immediately after she...


Pickett's History of Alabama
Albert James Pickett
1880216701
Jan 2003
Hardcover
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Gone with the Wind
Margaret Mitchell
0446365386
August 1993
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Sometimes only remembered for the epic motion picture and "Frankly ... I don't give a damn," Gone with the Wind was initially a compelling and entertaining novel. It was the sweeping story of tangled passions and the rare courage of a group of people in Atlanta during the time of Civil War that brought those cinematic scenes to life. The reason the movie became so popular was the strength of its characters--Scarlett O'Hara, Rhett Butler, and Ashley Wilkes--all created here by the deft hand of Margaret Mitchell, in this, her first novel. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The New York Times Book Review
This is beyond a doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced by an American writer. It is also one of the best. --This text...


A Pictorial History of the University of Georgia
F. N. Boney
0820321982
Apr 2000
Hardcover
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Gone with the Wind
Margaret Mitchell
068483068X
May 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Sometimes only remembered for the epic motion picture and "Frankly ... I don't give a damn," Gone with the Wind was initially a compelling and entertaining novel. It was the sweeping story of tangled passions and the rare courage of a group of people in Atlanta during the time of Civil War that brought those cinematic scenes to life. The reason the movie became so popular was the strength of its characters--Scarlett O'Hara, Rhett Butler, and Ashley Wilkes--all created here by the deft hand of Margaret Mitchell, in this, her first novel. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The New York Times Book Review
This is beyond a doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced by an American writer. It is also one of the best. --This text...


Freedom
Michael Thurmond
1563526875
Oct 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Decades before Georgia became the cradle of the modern Civil Rights Movement, generations of its African Americans waged a historic struggle to abolish the institution of slavery. Now Michael Thurmond presents this unique, fascinating story of black Georgia from the early eighteenth century until the end of the Civil War.


Matzoh Ball Gumbo : Culinary Tales of the Jewish South
Marcie Cohen Ferris
0807829781
October 10, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Many traditional Southern foods—pulled-pork barbecue, crab cakes, fried oyster po' boys, to name a few—violate traditional Jewish dietary laws, which forbid the consumption of pork and shellfish. What's a Southern Jew to do? Anthropological historian Ferris (UNC–Chapel Hill) answers that question in a gustatory tour of the Jewish South. She uncovers many dishes that blend Jewish and Southern foodways (recipes included for such tasties as Temple Israel Brisket and Cornmeal-Fried Fish Fillets with Sephardic Vinagre Sauce). Ferris sees food as a symbol that encompasses the problem of how Jews live in a region dominated by Christians: "The most tangible way to understand Jewish history and culture in the South is at the dinner table." Cynics will wonder if a Jewish kugel (noodle casserole) prepared...


The March
E. L. Doctorow
0375506713
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
As the Civil War was moving toward its inevitable conclusion, General William Tecumseh Sherman marched 60,000 Union troops through Georgia and the Carolinas, leaving a 60-mile-wide trail of death, destruction, looting, thievery and chaos. In The March, E.L. Doctorow has put his unique stamp on these events by staying close to historical fact, naming real people and places and then imagining the rest, as he did in Ragtime.

Recently, the Civil War has been the subject of novels by Howard Bahr, Michael Shaara, Charles Frazier, and Robert Hicks, to name a few. Its perennial appeal is due not only to the fact that it was fought on our own soil, but also that it captures perfectly our long-time and ongoing ambivalence about race. Doctorow examines this question extensively, chronicling the dislocation of both southern whites...



The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes
Max E. White
081302840X
Feb 2005
Paperback
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John E. Worth, Coosawattee Foundation
"A sound overview of Georgia's indigenous people...fill[s] an important void in the available literature about Georgia's rich human past." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
Spanning 12,000 years, this scientifically accurate yet non-technical and easily digestible book guides readers through the prehistoric and historic archaeological evidence left by Georgia's native peoples. It is the only comprehensive, up-to-date, and text-based overview of its kind in print. Max White draws on an extensive body of archaeological and historical data, tracing Native American cultural development and accomplishment over the millennia preceding the establishment of Georgia as a colony and state. Each chapter opens with a vivid...


Dwelling Place : A Plantation Epic
Erskine Clarke
0300108672
September 20, 2005
Hardcover
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Review
"Erskine Clarke's narrative of more than three generations of interlocking
and enslaving familes in Liberty County, Georgia, is epic in its scope and
mastery. With extensively detailed research and evocatively restrained
writing, "A Dwelling Place" is one of the best books ever on what it meant
in day-to-day terms to be slaves and slave masters in the antebellum
South."—Mark Noll, Wheaton College, author of "America's God, from
Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln"


A History of Georgia
Kenneth Coleman
082031269X
Mar 1991
Paperback
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Kira-Kira
Cynthia Kadohata
0689856393
February 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
In Cynthia Kadohata's lively, lovely, funny and sad novel -- winner of the 2005 Newbery Medal -- the Japanese-American Takeshima family moves from Iowa to Georgia in the 1950s when Katie, the narrator, is just in kindergarten. Though her parents endure grueling conditions and impossible hours in the non-unionized poultry plant and hatchery where they work, they somehow manage to create a loving, stable home for their three children: Lynn, Katie, and Sammy. Katie's trust in, and admiration for, her older sister Lynn never falters, even when her sisterly advice doesn't seem to make sense. Lynn teaches her about everything from how the sky, the ocean, and people's eyes are special to the injustice of racial prejudice. The two girls dream of buying a house for the family someday and even save $100 in candy money: "Our other...


Georgia O'Keeffe : Catalogue Raisonne
Barbara Buhler Lynes
0300081766
November 10, 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
Georgia O'Keeffe, who was born in 1887 and lived nearly 99 years, was a prolific, successful artist whose work was exhibited continually throughout her adult life. To give an impression of the scope of this two-volume boxed set, here is a sentence from the preface by Barbara Buhler Lynes: "The catalogue reproduces and describes 2,045 objects, made by O'Keeffe between 1901 [when she was 14] and 1984." And for an idea of the care Lynes brought to her task, here is the next: "Of these, 2,029 were located and examined between June 1992 and December 1998: 821 on canvas or board; 1,137 on paper...."

Obviously, this catalog will be indispensable to many libraries and museums, but it is also a work that any lover of O'Keeffe's art will pore over for years. From the first pages of volume 1, a reader is struck by the early...



47
Walter Mosley
0316110353
May 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 7-10–The intense, personal slave narrative of 14-year-old Forty-seven becomes allegorical when a mysterious runaway slave shows up at the Corinthian Plantation. Tall John, who believes there are no masters and no slaves, and who carries a yellow carpet bag of magical healing potions and futuristic devices, is both an inspiration and an enigma. He claims he has crossed galaxies and centuries and arrived by Sun Ship on Earth in 1832 to find the one chosen to continue the fight against the evil Calash. The brutal white overseer and the cruel slave owner are disguised Calash who must be defeated. Tall John inserts himself into Forty-seven's daily life and gradually cedes to him immortality and the power, confidence, and courage to confront the Calash to break the chains of slavery. With confidence,...


Georgia
Buddy Sullivan
0738524085
Oct 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Georgia's past has diverged from the nationís and given the state and its people a distinctive culture and character. Some of the best, and the worst, aspects of American and Southern history can be found in the story of what is arguably the most important state in the South. ÝÝ

About the Author
Yet just as clearly Georgia has not always followed the road traveled by the rest of the nation and the region. Explaining the common and divergent paths that make us who we are is one reason the Georgia Historical Society has collaborated with Buddy Sullivan and Arcadia Publishing to produce Georgia: A State History, the first full-length history of the state produced in nearly a generation. ÝÝSullivan's lively account draws upon the vast archival and...


March
E. L. Doctorow
0739321358
September 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
As the Civil War was moving toward its inevitable conclusion, General William Tecumseh Sherman marched 60,000 Union troops through Georgia and the Carolinas, leaving a 60-mile-wide trail of death, destruction, looting, thievery and chaos. In The March, E.L. Doctorow has put his unique stamp on these events by staying close to historical fact, naming real people and places and then imagining the rest, as he did in Ragtime.

Recently, the Civil War has been the subject of novels by Howard Bahr, Michael Shaara, Charles Frazier, and Robert Hicks, to name a few. Its perennial appeal is due not only to the fact that it was fought on our own soil, but also that it captures perfectly our long-time and ongoing ambivalence about race. Doctorow examines this question extensively, chronicling the dislocation of both...



Neat Pieces: The Plain-Style Furniture of Nineteenth-Century Georgia
Deanne D. Levison (Foreword)
0820328057
February 17, 2006
Paperback
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Our Connection with Savannah
Russell K. Brown
0865549168
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 


New Moon Rising (St. Simons Trilogy, Vol. 2) (The St. Simons Trilogy)
Eugenia Price
1577361814
February 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book News
Not since Gone with the Wind has a book told the Souths story in the way that New Moon Rising does. Miss Price has a feeling for the land, for its beauty and its secrets.

Cincinnati Inquirer
This is more than a Civil War novel, more than a romance, more than an adventure story. . .This is a novel even for those who don't read fiction, a historical drama for those whom history bores, and a revelation of insights for those who pooh-pooh psychology. This is a book to be read, without qualification.

See all Editorial Reviews


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
John Berendt
0679751521
July 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
John Berendt's Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil has been heralded as a "lyrical work of nonfiction," and the book's extremely graceful prose depictions of some of Savannah, Georgia's most colorful eccentrics--remarkable characters who could have once prospered in a William Faulkner novel or Eudora Welty short story--were certainly a critical factor in its tremendous success. (One resident into whose orbit Berendt fell, the Lady Chablis, went on to become a minor celebrity in her own right.) But equally important was Berendt's depiction of Savannah socialite Jim Williams as he stands trial for the murder of Danny Hansford, a moody, violence-prone hustler--and sometime companion to Williams--characterized by locals as a "walking streak of sex." So feel free to call it a "true crime classic" without a trace of shame. ...


Pickin' on Peachtree
Wayne W. Daniel
0252016874
Apr 1990
Hardcover
·
 
Bluegrass Unlimited
Clear out a spot on your bookshelf for it. And don't fail to read it before you put it there! --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
But for a few twists of fate, Atlanta could easily have grown to be the recording center that Nashville is today. Pickin' on Peachtree traces Atlanta's emergence in the 1920s as a major force in country recording and radio broadcasting, a position of dominance it enjoyed for some forty years. From the Old Time Fiddlers' Conventions and barn dances through the rise of station WSB and other key radio outlets, Wayne W. Daniel thoroughly documents the consolidation of country music as big business in Atlanta. He also profiles a vast array of performers, radio personalities, and recording moguls who transformed...


Gone with the Wind
Margaret Mitchell
0446675539
April 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Sometimes only remembered for the epic motion picture and "Frankly ... I don't give a damn," Gone with the Wind was initially a compelling and entertaining novel. It was the sweeping story of tangled passions and the rare courage of a group of people in Atlanta during the time of Civil War that brought those cinematic scenes to life. The reason the movie became so popular was the strength of its characters--Scarlett O'Hara, Rhett Butler, and Ashley Wilkes--all created here by the deft hand of Margaret Mitchell, in this, her first novel. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The New York Times Book Review
This is beyond a doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced by an American writer. It is also one of the best. --This text...


Pickin' on Peachtree
Wayne W. Daniel
0252069684
Feb 2001
Paperback
·
 
Bluegrass Unlimited
Clear out a spot on your bookshelf for it. And don't fail to read it before you put it there!

Book Description
But for a few twists of fate, Atlanta could easily have grown to be the recording center that Nashville is today. Pickin' on Peachtree traces Atlanta's emergence in the 1920s as a major force in country recording and radio broadcasting, a position of dominance it enjoyed for some forty years. From the Old Time Fiddlers' Conventions and barn dances through the rise of station WSB and other key radio outlets, Wayne W. Daniel thoroughly documents the consolidation of country music as big business in Atlanta. He also profiles a vast array of performers, radio personalities, and recording moguls who transformed the Peachtree city into the nerve center of early country...


Lighthouse (St. Simons Trilogy, v.1) (The St. Simons Trilogy)
Eugenia Price
1577361547
June 1, 1999
Paperback
·
 
Chattanooga Times
Newcomers to Ms. Price's work should soon join her legions of faithful readers.

Atlanta Journal Constitution
A charming and engaging picture of life in the South.

See all Editorial Reviews


Georgia O'Keeffe
Georgia O'Keeffe
0670337102


·
 
Book Description
For seven decades Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) was a major figure in American art who, remarkably, maintained her independence from shifting artistic trends. She painted prolifically, and almost exclusively, the flowers, animal bones, and landscapes around her studios in Lake George, New York, and New Mexico, and these subjects became her signature images. Remaining true to her own unique artistic vision, she created a highly individual style of painting that synthesized the formal language of modern European abstraction and the subjects of traditional American pictorialism. Ever popular with American critics and the public since the first years of her career, O'Keeffe's reputation with contemporary audiences has expanded into the international arena. This comprehensive and illuminating new book surveys Georgia...


Molly Moon's Hypnotic Time Travel Adventure
Georgia Byng
0060750324
August 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-6–If reading a Molly Moon title means navigating a variety of twists, turns, and sudden surprising revelations, then this addition to the series is no exception. Having perfected her hypnotic technique and defeated her villainous uncle in Molly Moon Stops the World (HarperCollins, 2004), the protagonist is caught completely unaware when a stranger kidnaps her beloved pug, Petula. It isn't long before Molly follows the pet backwards in time to 1870 India. There, she meets the repulsive Maharaja of Waqt, a spoonerism-loving cad who collects time-traveling crystals. Seeing Molly as an obstacle to his plans, he sets about kidnapping her at ages ten, six, and three, and as a baby. Now she must rescue her former selves and find a way to defeat Waqt, all while navigating some tricky time travel and...


A Voting Rights Odyssey
Laughlin McDonald
0521812321
Mar 2003
Hardcover
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Review
"Pulls no punches. . . A valuable addition to civil rights history." The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"...accessible and engaging to all readers...This third person history reflects the choice of an unassuming, thoughtful lawyer who possesses a courtly deference to others as the real heroes of good deeds." Southern Changes

"Laughlin writes with a historians breadth of knowledge and mastery of research, an advocate's passion and the acute perceptions of a veteran participant in civil rights litigation." Columbia College Today

"Pulls no punches. . . A valuable addition to civil rights history." The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"...helps explain why Georgia's redistributing battles have become so befuddling." The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

..."McDonald's stories evoke drama, as when he relates how Georgia's...


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