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India: A History
John Keay
0802137970
April 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The history of what is now India stretches back thousands of years, further than that of nearly any other region on earth. Yet, observes historian John Keay, most historical work on India concentrates on the period after the arrival of Europeans, with predictable biases, distortions, and misapprehensions. One, for example, is the tendency to locate the source of social conflict in India's many religions--to which Keay retorts, "Historically, it was Europe, not India, which consistently made religion grounds for war."

Taking the longest possible view, Keay surveys what is both provable and invented in the historical record. His narrative begins in 3000 B.C., with the complex, and little-understood, Harappan period, a time of state formation and the development of agriculture and trade networks. This period coincides with...



Curry : A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors
Lizzie Collingham
0195172418
February 6, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. There's nothing like trying to represent the food of India on a two-page menu to raise tricky questions about authenticity and mass taste. Isn't curry really a British invention? Does chicken tikka masala have anything to do with Indian food? Fortunately, Cambridge-trained historian Collingham supplies a welcome corrective: the cuisine of the Indian subcontinent has always been in glorious flux, and the popularity of chicken vindaloo on London's Brick Lane or New York's Curry Row (and beyond) is no simple betrayal of the cuisine. (As far as charges of cultural imperialism go, if it weren't for the Portuguese, the chilli pepper never would have had its massive impact on the region's delicacies.) Easy stratifications wilt in the face of fact: Hindu and Muslim culinary traditions have been...


Molly Moon's Hypnotic Time Travel Adventure
Georgia Byng
0060750324
August 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-6–If reading a Molly Moon title means navigating a variety of twists, turns, and sudden surprising revelations, then this addition to the series is no exception. Having perfected her hypnotic technique and defeated her villainous uncle in Molly Moon Stops the World (HarperCollins, 2004), the protagonist is caught completely unaware when a stranger kidnaps her beloved pug, Petula. It isn't long before Molly follows the pet backwards in time to 1870 India. There, she meets the repulsive Maharaja of Waqt, a spoonerism-loving cad who collects time-traveling crystals. Seeing Molly as an obstacle to his plans, he sets about kidnapping her at ages ten, six, and three, and as a baby. Now she must rescue her former selves and find a way to defeat Waqt, all while navigating some tricky time travel and...


Wave of Destruction
Erich Krauss
1594863784
Dec 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Kraus (Wall of Flame) provides a compelling account of four families in a Thai village devastated by the tsunami of December 26, 2004. The author first describes the harsh everyday existence of these villagers before the tsunami: a life of poverty in which children are sent off to work for abusive bosses, of earning a hazardous living by diving for tin or stealing lobsters from Burmese traps. The villagers Krauss describes are courageous: one woman, Dang, became an activist, fighting the powerful tin-mining company trying to force her from the land. Puek, blinded in an accident, rallied to help his wife, Lek, after the death of their young son. Krauss then details the tragic tsunami and its aftermath. Trying unsuccessfully to save a baby as wave after wave comes over her, one woman knows "she would never sleep...


Vietnam: A History
Stanley Karnow
0140265473
June 1997
Paperback
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Card catalog description
This monumental narrative clarifies, analyzes, and demystifies the tragic ordeal of the Vietnam war. Free of ideological bias, profound in its understanding, and compassionate in its human portrayals, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with the participants - French, American, Vietnamese, Chinese: diplomats, military commanders, high government officials, journalists, nurses, workers, and soldiers. Vietnam: A History puts events and decisions into such sharp focus that we come to understand - and make peace with - a convulsive epoch of our recent history.


Daktar
Viggo Olsen
0825433681
Feb 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
The classic missionary story of Dr. Viggo Olsen continues to thrill readers with its blend of excitement, insight, and inspiration.

About the Author
Viggo Olsen was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. He took premed studies at Tulane University and graduate studies at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine. After receiving his medical training, he moved to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) and founded a medical missions work in the Chittagong District where modern medical care was unknown. Dr. Olsen is now retired and living in California.


Gandhi An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth
Sissela Bok (Foreword), et al
0807059099
November 1, 1993
Paperback
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Book Review
Gandhi's nonviolent struggles in South Africa and India had already brought him to such a level of notoriety, adulation, and controversy that when asked to write an autobiography midway through his career, he took it as an opportunity to explain himself. Although accepting of his status as a great innovator in the struggle against racism, violence, and, just then, colonialism, Gandhi feared that enthusiasm for his ideas tended to exceed a deeper understanding. He says that he was after truth rooted in devotion to God and attributed the turning points, successes, and challenges in his life to the will of God. His attempts to get closer to this divine power led him to seek purity through simple living, dietary practices (he called himself a fruitarian), celibacy, and ahimsa, a life without violence. It is in this sense that he...


The Argumentative Indian: Writings on Indian Culture, History and Identity
Amartya Sen
0374105839
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
As India's multicultural society confronts violent sectarianism at home and a range of destabilizing forces internationally, these illuminating essays from Nobel Prize–winning economist Sen (most of which began as articles or lectures over the past decade) offer a timely and cogent examination of the country's long history of heterodoxy and public discourse. With sparkling erudition and crisp prose, Sen reminds readers of a capacious cultural legacy that has nourished a plethora of religious communities (including Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Parsee, Sikh and Baha'i), as well as a venerable line of atheist and materialist thought, while fostering ancient advances in science and mathematics, and inclusive theories of governance. Challenging the notion of the West as sole originator of...


Island Life : Inspirational Interiors
David Flint Wood, India Hicks
1584793171
March 1, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The daughter of designer David Hicks and the granddaughter of Louis Lord Mountbatten, India Hicks spent a decade as an international fashion model "before moving to the Bahamas with former advertising executive David Flint Wood." The two collaborated on building, restoring and decorating three homes, as well as a hotel; their book documents the results of their design efforts, and offers how-to tips on getting similar effects. Over 200 full-color photos by David Loftus offer calm, lovely looks at the couple’s Bahaman interiors (as well as a few exteriors and landscapes—along with occasional looks at the photogenic couple and their three children). If not for the authors’ explicitly invoked pedigree and a foreword by Ralph Lauren, this book might look a little plain, with a layout straining toward...


Liberty or Death
Patrick French
0006550452
Feb 1999
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Without a sharp focus, authors tackle the history of modern India at their peril. French, whose first book, Younghusband, won the 1995 Somerset Maugham Award, tries to do a bit too much. It's difficult to uncover new ground in the well-spaded turf of Indian independence. French is not the first to see Gandhi as a crank obsessed with bowel functions, Winston Churchill as a racist and the 1947 British exit strategy as a case of muddling through. He does, however, succeed at filling in some gaps, especially about British intelligence operations. French (who ran for Britain's parliament as a Green candidate and is currently director of the Free Tibet Campaign) nagged the Foreign Office to declassify 92 "bottle-green boxes" of files, and his analysis reveals a dying Raj under severe financial stress held together by...


Global Studies
James K. Norton
0072850248
Apr 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Global Studies series is designed to provide comprehensive background informatin and selected world press articles on the regions and countries of the world. This edition features an overview of South Asia and country reports for Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. An annotated list of World Wide Web sites guides students to additional resources.


Nectar in a Sieve
Kamala Markandaya
0451528239
January 2002
Mass Market Paperback
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From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Holly Smith
Rukmani, a peasant from a village in India, lives a life of constant struggle, yet she is a source of strength for many. At age twelve she marries a man she has never met and moves with him to his rented farmland. Over the years their marriage fills with love, mutual respect, and children: one daughter and many sons. A tannery built near their village forever alters Rukmani's life, for the tannery takes away farmland and silence, and while it provides jobs, they come with great costs. The changes in village life from an agricultural to an industrial community frighten Rukmani; her life becomes one of "Hope and fear. Twin forces that tugged at us first in one direction and then in another...Fear, constant companion of the peasant. Hunger, ever present to jog his elbow should he relax....


The Ruling Caste : Imperial Lives in the Victorian Raj
David Gilmour
0374283540
February 7, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
How much do we really know about the lives of the British in imperial India? Gilmour's deftly organized, encyclopedic account of the day-to-day existence of the members of the Indian Civil Service (ICS) upends the view of the British rulers as tyrannical, racist philistines, an image born out of such works as E.M. Forster's A Passage to India and advanced strenuously since postcolonial studies emerged in the 1970s. Gilmour, author of highly regarded biographies of Rudyard Kipling and Lord Curzon, assembles a wealth of light, amusing anecdotes on an astounding range of topics concerning the members of the ICS, including their college days, bad habits, job duties, gripes about the weather and courtship practices. Though lacking in analysis, the sympathetic general portrait gives a good insider's view of how these...


India
John Gallagher
0760773351
February 2006
Hardcover
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India's and China's Recent Experience with Reform and Growth
Wanda S. Tseng (Editor), David G. Cowen (Editor)
1403943516
April 3, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
China and India already rank among the world's largest economies, and each is moving rapidly towards the centre stage of the global economy. In this process different priorities have been placed on economic reforms in the past two decades--China taking a more outward strategy and India, until recently, a more inward one. Can they continue to rank among the fastest expanding economies? This volumes addresses the issue, highlighting what has worked and what more needs to be done to ensure sustained rapid economic growth and poverty reduction. Addressing the two countries' recent experiences with growth and reform, this book provides important insight for other developing economies.


Global Studies
James K. Norton
0073198730
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
GLOBAL STUDIES is a unique series designed to provide comprehensive background information and selected world press articles on the regions and countries of the world. Each GLOBAL STUDIES volume includes an annotated listing of World Wide Web sites. Visit our website for more information: www.dushkin.com/global studies/


The Essential Gandhi : An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas (Vintage Spiritual Classics)
Mahatma Gandhi, et al
1400030501
November 12, 2002
Paperback
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Review
"Gandhi believed in revealing himself. He regarded secrecy as the enemy of freedom-not only the freedom of India but the freedom of man. He exposed even the innermost personal thoughts which individuals usually regard as private. In nearly a half-century of prolific writing, speaking, and subjecting his ideas to the test of actions, he painted a detailed self-portrait of his mind, heart, and soul.

"Gandhi was a unique person, a great person, perhaps the greatest figure of the last nineteen hundred years. And his words have been preserved as they came from his mouth and pen."

-- Louis Fischer

Review
"Gandhi believed in revealing himself. He regarded secrecy as the enemy of freedom-not only the freedom of India but the freedom of man. He exposed even the...


Midnight's Children
Salman Rushdie
0140132708
January 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Anyone who has spent time in the developing world will know that one of Bombay's claims to fame is the enormous film industry that churns out hundreds of musical fantasies each year. The other, of course, is native son Salman Rushdie--less prolific, perhaps than Bollywood, but in his own way just as fantastical. Though Rushdie's novels lack the requisite six musical numbers that punctuate every Bombay talkie, they often share basic plot points with their cinematic counterparts. Take, for example, his 1980 Booker Prize-winning Midnight's Children: two children born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947--the moment at which India became an independent nation--are switched in the hospital. The infant scion of a wealthy Muslim family is sent to be raised in a Hindu tenement, while the legitimate heir to such squalor ends...


A History of India
Romila Thapar
0140138358
Sept 1990
Paperback
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India Unbound: From Independence to the Global Information Age
Gurcharan Das
0385720742
April 2002
Paperback
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Review
“Something tremendous is happening in India, and Das, with his keen eye and often elegant prose, has his finger firmly on the pulse of the transformation.”–The New York Times Book Review

“One of the most readable and insightful book s to appear on India’s tortuous economic path in its 54 years since shaking off British rule.”–Business Week

“Head and shoulders above the customary bunch. This elegant essay has something for everyone.”–St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“For American readers accustomed to view India as a land of tigers rather than high-tech and maharajahs rather than microchips, this book will come as a welcome surprise.” --The Washington Post Book World

“Informative, entertaining, and...


A History of India
Percival Spear
0140138366
Dec 1990
Paperback
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Kashmir
Humra Quraishi
0143030876
May 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
Since 1989, Kashmir has rarely been out of the headlines, as local militants, foreign terrorists, and Indian security forces battle it out in a region once known as `paradise on earth'. In all the propaganda, and news and statistics about terrorist strikes, counter insurgency operations, and the foreign hand, the human stories are often lost. In this book, journalist Humra Quraishi draws upon her extensive travels in the Valley and interactions with ordinary Kashmiris over two decades to try and understand what the long strife has done to them. She brings us heartrending stories of mothers waiting for their young sons who disappeared years ago, picked up by the army or by militants; minds undone by the constant uncertainty and fear and almost daily humiliation; old harmonies tragically undermined by the atmosphere of...


Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found
Suketu Mehta
0375703403
September 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Bombay native Mehta fills his kaleidoscopic portrait of "the biggest, fastest, richest city in India" with captivating moments of danger and dismay. Returning to Bombay (now known as Mumbai) from New York after a 21-year absence, Mehta is depressed by his beloved city's transformation, now swelled to 18 million and choked by pollution. Investigating the city's bloody 1992–1993 riots, he meets Hindus who massacred Muslims, and their leader, the notorious Godfather-like founder of the Hindu nationalist Shiv Sena party, Bal Thackeray, "the one man most directly responsible for ruining the city I grew up in." Daring to explore further the violent world of warring Hindu and Muslim gangs, Mehta travels into the city's labyrinthine criminal underworld with tough top cop Ajay Lal, developing an uneasy familiarity...


The Feast of Roses
Indu Sundaresan
0743456416
May 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Sundaresan picks up the story of Mehrunnisa, the remarkable heroine from her debut novel, Twenty Wives, as the so-called "Light of the World" consolidates her power as wife of Emperor Jahangir of the Mughal Empire in 17th-century India, only to see her dominion destroyed by her own aggressive tendencies. The early chapters find Mehrunnisa confronting two rivals, who happen to be old friends of her husband, and eliminating them in a brief series of power struggles. She also talks Jahangir into letting her appear at the jharoka ceremony, in which the emperor presents himself to his subjects, an unprecedented achievement for a woman. Her problems start when Jahangir falls seriously ill and the battle for succession to the throne begins, a struggle that comes to a head when Mehrunnisa fails to marry off her daughter,...


Maharanis
Lucy Moore
0143037048
July 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Drawing on accounts from the waning days of the Raj and the British Empire to the present, Moore (The Thieves' Opera) brings exhaustive research to bear on the stories of four Indian queens who used their power to help forge social change. Her fly-on-the-wall approach gives their triumphs and struggles immediacy. Refined Chimnabai began her marriage to the maharaja of the northern city of Baroda in purdah, which kept married women hidden from men other than their husbands, but after breaking purdah in 1913, she became a champion of women's rights. Sunity Devi, maharani of Cooch Behar (near what is now Bangladesh), forged a close friendship with Queen Victoria and wrote books on India's history for British audiences. Chimnabai's gorgeous daughter, Indira, rejected her arranged alliance in order to marry Sunity's...


Buddha's Not Smiling : Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today
Erik D. Curren
0977225305
February 22, 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In 1981, the 16th Karmapa—leading lama of the Karma Kagyu branch of Tibetan Buddhism—died. In a highly biased but fascinating account, first-time author Curren describes the controversy over the Karmapa's succession that still rages today. After the 16th Karmapa's death, two different factions arose, each naming a different boy the 17th Karmapa: Ogyen Trinley, supported by several Karma Kagyu leaders and the Dalai Lama, and Trinley Thaye, whom the second-ranking Kama Kagyu lama, Shamar Rinpoche, believes to be the true Karmapa. While most previous accounts of the controversy have favored Ogyen Trinley, Curren—who acknowledges early on that he is a student of Shamar Rinpoche—believes Ogyen Trinley to be a fraud. Curren is quite critical of the Dalai Lama, suggesting that His Holiness should...

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