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Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq
Stephen Kinzer
0805078614
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The recent ouster of Saddam Hussein may have turned "regime change" into a contemporary buzzword, but it's been a tactic of American foreign policy for more than 110 years. Beginning with the ouster of Hawaii's monarchy in 1893, Kinzer runs through the foreign governments the U.S. has had a hand in toppling, some of which he has written about at length before (in All the Shah's Men, etc.). Recent invasions of countries such as Grenada and Panama may be more familiar to readers than earlier interventions in Iran and Nicaragua, but Kinzer, a foreign correspondent for the New York Times, brings a rich narrative immediacy to all of his stories. Although some of his assertions overreach themselves—as when he proposes that better conduct by the American government in the Spanish-American War might have prevented...


Philippines' 2 Millennium History
Luzano P. Canlas
0741403234
Sept 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
The Philippines. A cultural middleman between East and West for thousands of years. Where can you find a history of this fascinating island-nation that's concise yet easy to read? That's portable enough to be a travel guide yet scholarly enough to be a schoolroom text? Luzano Canlas has written the definitive work on these 7,000 isles and its 75 million people, from its legendary link to Noah to last year's mineral resource output.

About the Author
Luzano Canlas is scholar of high regard, and has several excellent works on a variety of topics which will soon be published.


Jose Maria Sison
Jose Maria Sison
0940880725
Sept 2004
Paperback
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Senator Loren Legarda, Majority Floor Leader, Philippine Senate
"This political biography of Professor Jose Maria Sison is thought provoking and a necessary read..."

Ramsey Clark, Former Attorney General of the United States
"Those of us working to stop the unbridled aggression against the world...should make every effort to defend Sison..."

See all Editorial Reviews


When the Elephants Dance
Tess Uriza Holthe
0142002887
June 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
Tess Uriza Holthe writes with a mixture of metaphor and fact, a combination of the supernatural and the all-too-real. When the Elephants Dance opens, in fact, with an apposite metaphor for a horrible reality: "Papa explains the war like this: 'When the elephants dance, the chickens must be careful.'" The elephants in question are the Americans and the Japanese, fighting for possession of the Philippines. The chickens are, of course, the ordinary Filipinos. Three of these "chickens" by turns tell us the story of the Japanese occupation as a small neighborhood near Manila literally goes underground, hiding in the cellar and swapping stories. Holthe takes her onus as a seminal Filipino voice seriously; she sometimes seems determined to cram every bit of tradition, history, and myth into her novel, to the detriment of the plot's...


In Our Image: America's Empire in the Philippines
Stanley Karnow
0345328167
March 3, 1990
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Though Karnow claims that U.S. imperialism in its former colony, the Philippines, has been "uniquely benign" compared to European colonialism, the evidence set forth in this colorful, briskly readable history undercuts that prognosis. He shows that a succession of U.S. presidents and administrators coddled the archipelago's 60 or so ruling families, perpetuating the feudal oligarchy that continues to this day, and widening the gap between rich and poor. Karnow, whose Vietnam: A History is a standard account of the American venture in Southeast Asia, draws intriguing parallels: the U.S.-Philippine war of 1898, much like the Vietnam experience, dehumanized U.S. troops, who looted and annihilated villages; ex-President Marcos, like South Vietnamese ruler Diem, presented Washington with the problem of how to deal...


Ghost Soldiers: The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission
Hampton Sides
038549565X
May 2002
Paperback
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Review
“[Sides] liberates his story from documentary and turns it into epic. . . . More than any monument, Ghost Soldiers is the memorial both prisoners and liberators deserve.” —The Seattle Times

“The greatest World War II story never told.” —Esquire

“[A] beautiful account of heroism . . . Sure to be a classic.” —Men’s Journal

“Riveting and patriotically stirring without ever slipping into mawkishness or sentimentality.” —The New York Times

“Thoroughly researched and artfully told. . . . A compelling story filled with colorful characters.” —The San Francisco Chronicle

Review
?[Sides] liberates his story from documentary and turns...


The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors : The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour
James D. Hornfischer
0553802577
February 3, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
One of the finest WWII naval action narratives in recent years, this book follows in the footsteps of Flags of Our Fathers, creating a microcosm of the war's American Navy destroyers. Hornfischer, a writer and literary agent in Austin, Tex., covers the battle off Samar, the Philippines, in October 1944, in which a force of American escort carriers and destroyers fought off a Japanese force many times its strength, and the larger battle of Leyte Gulf, the opening of the American liberation of the Philippines, which might have suffered a major setback if the Japanese had attacked the transports. He presents the men who crewed the destroyer Taffy 3, most of whom had never seen salt water before the war but who fought, flew, kept the crippled ship afloat, and doomed ships fighting almost literally to the last shell....


GI Joe Doesn't Live Here Anymore
Thomas C. Utts
1413778356
Feb 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Early in the 20th century, the hoofbeats of U.S. Cavalry horses were a familiar sound at America’s new base in the Philippines. At the beginning of WWII, Japanese bombs destroyed American planes on the runway. After the war, the base played a vital role, providing men and equipment to wars in Korea and Vietnam…until the 1991 monster eruption of Mt. Pinatubo sent American airmen away, never to return. This gritty, poignant, humorous, and sometimes disturbing chronicle reconstructs the 90-year history of what was the largest, and one of the most colorful, overseas United States military bases. That story is told in previously unpublished letters, writings, and personal accounts by the men, women, and families who were stationed there.


Ghost Soldiers: The Forgotten Epic Story of World War II's Most Dramatic Mission
Hampton Sides
0385495641
May 2001
Hardcover
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Book Review's Best of 2001
The Bataan Death March was just the beginning of the woes American soldiers captured by the Japanese army in the Philippines had to endure. The survivors of the march faced not only their captors' regular brutality (having surrendered, they were considered to be less than honorable foes), but also a host of illnesses such as dysentery and malaria. For three years these "ghost soldiers" lived in misery, suffering terrible losses.

When Army Rangers among Douglas MacArthur's forces arrived in the Philippines, they hatched a daring plan to liberate their captured comrades, a mission that, if successful, would prove to be a tremendous morale booster at the front and at home. Led by a young officer named Henry Mucci (called "Little MacArthur" for his constant pipe as well as his brilliance as a strategist), a...



History of the Defenders of the Philippines Guam and Wake Islands 1941-1945 Volume II
Bill Schiller
1563114054
Jan 1998
Hardcover
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The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour
James D. Hornfischer
0553381482
March 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
One of the finest WWII naval action narratives in recent years, this book follows in the footsteps of Flags of Our Fathers, creating a microcosm of the war's American Navy destroyers. Hornfischer, a writer and literary agent in Austin, Tex., covers the battle off Samar, the Philippines, in October 1944, in which a force of American escort carriers and destroyers fought off a Japanese force many times its strength, and the larger battle of Leyte Gulf, the opening of the American liberation of the Philippines, which might have suffered a major setback if the Japanese had attacked the transports. He presents the men who crewed the destroyer Taffy 3, most of whom had never seen salt water before the war but who fought, flew, kept the crippled ship afloat, and doomed ships fighting almost literally to the last shell....


Noli Me Tangere (Shaps Library of Translations)
Jose P. Rizal, et al
0824819179
June 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
In more than a century since its appearance, José Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere has become widely known as the great novel of the Philippines. A passionate love story set against the ugly political backdrop of repression, torture, and murder, "The Noli," as it is called in the Philippines, was the first major artistic manifestation of Asian resistance to European colonialism, and Rizal became a guiding conscience—and martyr—for the revolution that would subsequently rise up in the Spanish province. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Spanish --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Pananandata
Amante P. Marinas
1581602871
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Filipino martial artist Amante Marinas Sr. brings the seldom-seen origins and techniques of a dozen weapons of the Philippine Islands together in one place in Pananandata: History and Techniques of the Daga, Yantok, Balisong, and Other Traditional Weapons of the Philippines. Not since Dan Inosanto's out-of-print classic The Filipino Martial Arts has one book encompassed so many different aspects of the arts of the Philippines. Marinas uses clear instruction and step-by-step photos to teach readers the fighting techniques of such weapons as the dikin (ring), hawakan (Philippine tonfa), latiko (whip), blowgun and tabak toyok (nunchaku), tracing these weapons from their origins as tools in the rural farmlands and demonstrating their deadly effectiveness today.

About the Author
...


Clash of the Carriers: The True Story of the Marianas Turkey Shoot of World War II
Barrett Tillman
0451216709
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Author of specialty histories about U.S. Navy planes of the Pacific War, Tillman here writes up the war's largest carrier--versus--carrier battle. Exacting in his attention to data about planes and weapons, Tillman's narrative of the Battle of the Philippine Sea in June 1944 remains sufficiently straightforward to follow through the fury of dogfights and bombing attacks. Briefing readers about the strategic precipitator for the battle, the American capture of the Mariana Islands, Tillman explains what the Japanese navy proposed to do about it. Having rebuilt its naval air force after the Midway disaster, the Japanese retained one technical advantage: superior aircraft range. Unfortunately for them, the arsenal of democracy had built a superior fighter plane since Midway: the Hellcat, which in this battle destroyed every...


Population and History
Daniel F. Doeppers
1881261239
Mar 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
 A comprehensive demographic history of the Philippines and a study of social and economic change across the archipelago.

Distributed for the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Wisconsin–Madison


Lang
Norman Rudi
1888223529
Nov 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
"I shall return." Many are familiar with these famous words spoken by Gen. MacArthur before he left the Philippines as the Japanese began their takeover of the island nation. But few know the stories of those left behind, including the struggle for survival by Iowa soldier Dick Lang. Refusing to surrender, Lang joined the Filipinos as a guerilla soldier in an attempt to liberate the country, and ultimately, to win his own freedom. Harrowing and heroic, this record of jungle life and guerilla warfare is a true story of personal endurance and bravery.


We Band of Angels: The Untold Story of American Nurses Trapped on Bataan by the Japanese
Elizabeth M. Norman
0671787187
May 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
"Found worms in my oatmeal this morning. I shouldn't have objected because they had been sterilized in the cooking and I was getting fresh meat with my breakfast.... I'm still losing weight and so are most of us..."

Ruth Marie Straub, an Army nurse, wrote those words in her diary on March 15, 1942, just over three months after the Japanese first bombed the U.S. military base in Manila. She and her colleagues had evacuated the city and established, in the Philippine jungle, hospitals for the skyrocketing numbers of casualties. In the face of the advancing Japanese Army, the nurses and other military personnel continued to retreat, first to the Bataan Peninsula, and then to Corregidor, a rocky island in Manila Bay. Straub was one of the lucky ones; she was evacuated with a handful of other nurses in April 1942. Her...



America Is in the Heart: A Personal History
Carlos Bulosan
029595289X
January 1995
Paperback
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Saturday Review of Literature
"People interested in driving from America the scourge of intolerance should read Mr. Bulosan's autobiography."

Book Description
First published in 1946, this autobiography of the well-known Filipino poet describes his boyhood in the Philippines, his voyage to America, and his years of hardship and despair as an itinerant laborer following the harvest trail in the rural West. Bulosan does not spare the reader any of the horrors that accompanied the migrant's life; but his quiet, stoic voice is the most convincing witness to those terrible events.

See all Editorial Reviews


An Economic History of the Philippines
O. D. Corpuz
971542094X
Mar 1999
Paperback
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The Battle Of Leyte Gulf: The Last Fleet Action (Twentieth-Century Battles)
H. P. Willmott
0253345286
August 2, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
"The Battle of Leyte Gulf was an extremely unusual battle. It was unusual on five separate counts that are so obvious that they are usually missed. It was unusual in that it was a series of actions, not a single battle. It was unusual as a naval battle in that it was fought over five days; historically, naval battles have seldom spread themselves over more than one or two days. It was unusual in terms of its name. This battle involved a series of related actions subsequently grouped together under the name of just one of these engagements, but in fact none of the actions were fought inside Leyte Gulf. . . . More importantly, it was unusual in that it was a full-scale fleet action fought after the issue of victory and defeat at sea had been decided, and it was unusual in that it resulted in clear, overwhelming victory...


Great Raid: Rescuing the Doomed Ghosts of Bataan and Corregidor
William B. Breuer
1401360017
August 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
The Great Raid film will be showing in theatres across North America starting on August 12, and the screenplay is co-written by Miramax author William B. Breuer and Hampton Sides. The movie stars Benjamin Bratt, Joseph Fiennes, James Franco, Connie Nielsen and Martin Csokas. The Great Raid is a must-have for fans of WWII books. Breuer expands on the information in the bestselling Ghost Soldiers with descriptions of the military efforts of Gen. MacArthur operating from Australia from 1942-1945, and much more on the clandestine operations in Cabanatuan Town. Throughout the book are powerful, first-person recollections from the men who ran the underground operations in the Philippines, as well as the families back home receiving news that their loved ones survived.


Reappraising an Empire
Peter W. Stanley
0674749758
Feb 1985
Hardcover
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Theodore Rex
Edmund Morris
0812966007
October 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
In this lively biography, Edmund Morris returns to the gifted, energetic, and thoroughly controversial man whom the novelist Henry James called "King Theodore." In his two terms as president of the United States, Roosevelt forged an American empire, and he behaved as if it was his destiny. In this sequel to his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, Morris charts Roosevelt's accomplishments: the acquisition of the Panama Canal and the Philippines, the creation of national parks and monuments, and more. "Collaring Capital and Labor in either hand," Morris writes, Roosevelt made few friends, but he usually got what he wanted--and earned an enduring place in history.

Morris combines a fine command of the era's big issues with an appreciation for the daily minutiae involved in governing a nation....



Sitting in Darkness: Americans in the Philippines
David Haward Bain
0140089926


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Philippine-American Military History, 1902-1942
Richard B. Meixsel
0786414030
Aug 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Military obligations rested lightly upon the Filipino people for much of the period that America occupied the Philippines, but Filipinos could enlist in the United States Army and Navy, attend the service academies at West Point and Annapolis, or join military organizations restricted to duty in the islands such as the Philippine Scouts, Philippine Constabulary, Philippine National Guard, and the navy's insular force. In the 1930s, the Philippine government established its own armed forces. Throughout much of this time, the U.S. army also kept a substantial portion of its troop strength in the Philippines. This annotated bibliography of nearly 700 titles highlights the extent and variety of the Philippine-American military experience from the conquest of the islands by the United States in 1902 to the defeat of...

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