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Memoir of a Cold War Soldier

0873386752


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Book Description
Colonel Mack (U.S. Army retired) recalls his service in frontline combat infantry units in Korea and Vietnam as a rifle platoon leader, advisor, and battalion commander. His accounts, perceptions, and observations of the military culture are incisive and candid. This book will be of interest to those who served in Korea and Vietnam, but anyone with an interest in military culture and history will find Memoir of a Cold War Soldier a valuable source.

About the Author
Richard E. Mack, a decorated officer, regired from the Army after 30 years of service. He has contributed articles to Marine Corps Gazette, Infantry Magazine, Military Review, and Army Aviation Digest.


Marine Sniper
Charles Henderson
0425103552
Jan 1988
Paperback
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Book Description
Marine Sniper is not only one of the most astonishing true stories to emerge from the Vietnam War, it has become a classic of military nonfiction, inspiring a sequel, Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper's Vietnam Story Continues.

There have been many Marines. There have been many marksmen. But there has only been one Sergeant Carlos Hathcock. A legend in the Marine ranks, Hathcock stalked the Viet Cong behind enemy lines-on their own ground. And each time he emerged from the jungle having done his duty. His record is one of the finest in military history, with 93 confirmed kills.

This is the story of a simple man who endured incredible dangers and hardships for his country and his Corps. These are the missions that have made Carlos Hathcock a legend in the brotherhood of Marines.

...


The Vietnam War: 1945-1975 (History SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1411404262
July 2005
Paperback
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Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam
H. R. McMaster
0060929081
January 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
For years the popular myth surrounding the Vietnam War was that the Joint Chiefs of Staff knew what it would take to win but were consistently thwarted or ignored by the politicians in power. Now H. R. McMaster shatters this and other misconceptions about the military and Vietnam in Dereliction of Duty. Himself a West Point graduate, McMaster painstakingly waded through every memo and report concerning Vietnam from every meeting of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to build a comprehensive picture of a house divided against itself: a president and his coterie of advisors obsessed with keeping Vietnam from becoming a political issue versus the Joint Chiefs themselves, mired in interservice rivalries and unable to reach any unified goals or conclusions about the country's conduct in the war. McMaster stresses two elements in his...


Six Silent Men
Reynel Martinez
0804115664
Dec 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
"No way in hell you could survive 'out there' with six men. You couldn't live thirty minutes 'out there' with only six men."                [pg. 13]



In 1965 nearly four hundred men were interviewed and only thirty-two selected for the infant LRRP Detachment of the lst Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Old-timers called it the suicide unit. Whether conducting prisoner snatches, search and destroy missions, or hunting for the enemy's secret base camps, LRRPs depended on one another 110 percent. One false step, one small mistake by one man could mean sudden death for all.



Author Reynel Martinez, himself a 101st LRRP Detachment veteran, takes us into the lives and battles of the extraordinary men for whom...


Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife : Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam
General Peter J. Schoomaker (Foreword), John A. Nagl
0226567702
September 15, 2005
Paperback
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Review
Michael Schrage Washington Post :  "[A] highly regarded counterinsurgency manual."-Michael Schrage, Washington Post
Tom Baldwin Times (UK) : "The success of DPhil papers by Oxford students is usually gauged by the amount of dust they gather on library shelves. But there is one that is so influential that General George Casey, the US commander in Iraq, is said to carry it with him everywhere. Most of his staff have been ordered to read it and he pressed a copy into the hands of Donald Rumsfeld when he visited Baghdad in December. Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife (a title taken from T.E. Lawrence - himself no slouch in guerrilla warfare) is a study of how the British Army succeeded in snuffing out the Malayan insurgency between 1948 and 1960 - and why the Americans failed in Vietnam. . . . It is...


We Were Soldiers Once...and Young
Harold G. Moore
0345472640
June 2004
Paperback
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Review
“A GUT-WRENCHING ACCOUNT OF WHAT WAR IS REALLY ALL ABOUT, which should be ‘must’ reading for all Americans, especially those who have been led to believe that war is some kind of Nintendo game.”
–GENERAL H. NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF

“Hal Moore and Joe Galloway have captured the terror and exhilaration, the comradeship and self-sacrifice, the brutality and compassion that are the dark heart of war.”
–NEIL SHEEHAN, author of A Bright Shining Lie

“A powerful and epic story . . . This is the best account of infantry combat I have ever read, and the most significant book to come out of the Vietnam War.”
–COLONEL DAVID HACKWORTH, author of the bestseller About Face


From the Trade Paperback edition.

...


Vietnam: A History
Stanley Karnow
0140265473
June 1997
Paperback
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Card catalog description
This monumental narrative clarifies, analyzes, and demystifies the tragic ordeal of the Vietnam war. Free of ideological bias, profound in its understanding, and compassionate in its human portrayals, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with the participants - French, American, Vietnamese, Chinese: diplomats, military commanders, high government officials, journalists, nurses, workers, and soldiers. Vietnam: A History puts events and decisions into such sharp focus that we come to understand - and make peace with - a convulsive epoch of our recent history.


Bury Us Upside Down : The Misty Pilots and the Secret Battle for the Ho Chi Minh Trail
Rick Newman, Don Shepperd
0345465377
February 28, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This thoroughly readable, absorbing history chronicles the air operations known as Misty (officially called Commando Sabre) along the Ho Chi Minh trail during the Vietnam War. Flying mostly F-100s, the air force pilots acted as FACs (forward air controllers) for strike aircraft, directing them to North Vietnamese supply convoys and other targets along the conduit. Newman, a journalist, and Shepperd, a retired two-star air force general and current CNN commentator, launch their account with the story of Howard K. Williams, a pilot shot down on a Misty mission in 1968 and declared deceased in 1978 (his remains were recovered in 1991). They also bring to life a wide cast of Misty characters, including Williams's long-suffering widow, Monalee, daredevil Jim Fiorelli, hyperconfident pilot Dick Rutan and several airmen...


Element of Surprise: Navy Seals in Vietnam
Darryl Young
0804105812
March 1990
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
It used to be said that the night belonged to Charlie. But that wasn't true where SEALs patrolled. For six months in 1970, fourteen men in Juliett Platoon of the Navy's SEAL Team One--incuding the author--carried out over a hundred missions in the Mekong Delta without a single platoon fatality. Their primary mission: kidnap enemy soldiers--alive--for interrogation.

Inside Flap Copy
It used to be said that the night belonged to Charlie. But that wasn't true where SEALs patrolled. For six months in 1970, fourteen men in Juliett Platoon of the Navy's SEAL Team One--incuding the author--carried out over a hundred missions in the Mekong Delta without a single platoon fatality. Their primary mission: kidnap enemy soldiers--alive--for interrogation.


Silent Warrior
Charles Henderson
0425188647
Jan 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Henderson, a retired Marine Corps officer, first told Hathcock's Vietnam-and-aftermath stories in his highly readable, highly hagiographic Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills (1986), which continues to be a favorite item at the PX. Sniper detailed how U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos J. Hathcock II used his uncanny marksmanship in Vietnam to record more than 300 hits, and how he dragged six of his unconscious buddies away from a burning tank. After an arduous recovery from serious burns received then, Hathcock learned that he had multiple sclerosisAthe disease he succumbed to last year. Henderson frames Warrior by imagining what Hathcock was thinking on his deathbed. Waves of imagined dialogue, based on interviews Henderson conducted with Hathcock and with a raft of witnesses to his heroics, crash through page after...


Boys of '67: From Vietnam to Iraq, the Extraordinary Story of a Few Good Men
Tony Zinni (Foreword), Charles Jones
0811701638
March 17, 2006
Hardcover
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Maj Robert T. Jordan, USMC (Ret), Leatherneck
"[A] gripping tale of three very different Marines destined to become legends."

Col Thomas D. Stouffer, USMC (Ret), Marine Corps Gazette
"His description of combat operations is accurate and compelling."

See all Editorial Reviews


Flying through Midnight: A Pilot's Dramatic Story of His Secret Missions over Laos during the Vietnam War
John T. Halliday
0743274881
October 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
When John Halliday arrived at Thailand's Nakhon Phanom Air Base in 1970, he thought the next year would bore him out of his skull. He believed his mission in the Vietnam War would be to fly cargo around Thailand. What could be easier? A couple of nights later, Halliday found himself dodging dozens of anti-aircraft shells in an aging cargo plane over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Flying Through Midnight is his riveting account of his top-secret black-ops assignment--one of the most dangerous of the war.

Halliday flew slow propeller-driven relics at night deep into guerrilla territory in the "unofficial" war in Laos. His task with the 606th Special Operations Squadron was to help pinpoint guerrilla truck convoys for U.S. planes to bomb. Meanwhile, President Richard Nixon denied U.S. forces were fighting in Laos. Halliday wasn't...



We were Soldiers Once...And Young: Ia Drang--The Battle That Changed The War In Vietnam
Harold G. Moore, Joseph L. Galloway
0679411585
October 20, 1992
Hardcover
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Book Review
In the first significant engagement between American troops and the Viet Cong, 450 U.S. soldiers found themselves surrounded and outnumbered by their enemy. This book tells the story of how they battled between October 23 and November 26, 1965. Its prose is gritty, not artful, delivering a powerful punch of here-and-now descriptions that could only have been written by people actually on the scene. In fact, they were: Harold Moore commanded the men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, who did most of the fighting, and Joseph Galloway was the only reporter present throughout the battle's 34 harrowing days. We Were Soldiers Once... combines their memories with more than 100 in-depth interviews with survivors on both sides. The Battle of Ia Drang also highlights a technological advance that would play an enormous role in the rest...


A Bright Shining Lie
Neil Sheehan
0679724141
Sept 1989
Paperback
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Book Review
This passionate, epic account of the Vietnam War centers on Lt. Col. John Paul Vann, whose story illuminates America's failures and disillusionment in Southeast Asia. Vann was a field adviser to the army when American involvement was just beginning. He quickly became appalled at the corruption of the South Vietnamese regime, their incompetence in fighting the Communists, and their brutal alienation of their own people. Finding his superiors too blinded by political lies to understand that the war was being thrown away, he secretly briefed reporters on what was really happening. One of those reporters was Neil Sheehan. This definitive expose on why America lost the war won the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1989.

From Publishers Weekly
Killed in a helicopter crash in Vietnam in...


Five Years to Freedom: The Story of a Vietnam POW
James N. Rowe
0345314603
August 2005
Mass Market Paperback
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From AudioFile
Reathel Bean expertly delivers Rowe's story of his years of imprisonment in a Vietcong POW camp. He sounds masculine, deeply committed to his cause, and disciplined throughout; in this his narration matches Rowe's prose perfectly. Rowe flavors his narrative with snatches of dialogue from his captors, and Bean handles the pidgin English and stylized speech well. However, perhaps because of the abridgment or because of Rowe's own personality, a degree of emotional distance remains even when Rowe is recounting suffering and near starvation. As a result, this account is historically important but not always deeply engaging. G.T.B. © AudioFile 2003, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review
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SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam
John L. Plaster
0451195086
May 1998
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Plaster (The Ultimate Sniper), a retired Army major, served three tours with the secretive "Studies and Observation Group," aka SOG, during the Vietnam War-a background he has put to good use in this authoritative and insightful look at the now defunct commando unit. Plaster does much to illuminate both this frequently misunderstood group and its extraordinary participants. Made up entirely of volunteers, SOG tackled a wide range of vital and dangerous duties, including missions deep into enemy territory and rescues of downed American pilots. Special Forces veterans in particular will delight in the descriptions of America's old tribal allies, the Montagnards of Vietnam. Specialists in poison-arrow warfare, the primitive "'Yards," Plaster explains, were both fierce fighters and a constant source of wonderment to...


Stolen Valor
B. G. Burkett
096670360X
Jan 1998
Hardcover
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A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America's Last Years in Vietnam
Lewis Sorley
0156013096
September 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
There was a moment when the United States had the Vietnam War wrapped up, writes military historian Lewis Sorley (biographer of two Vietnam-era U.S. Army generals, Creighton Abrams and Harold Johnson). "The fighting wasn't over, but the war was won," he says in this convention-shaking book. "This achievement can probably best be dated in late 1970." South Vietnam was ready to carry on the battle without American ground troops and only logistical and financial support. Sorley says that replacing General Westmoreland with Abrams in 1968 was the key. "The tactics changed within fifteen minutes of Abrams's taking command," remarked one officer. Abrams switched the war aims from destruction to control; he was less interested in counting enemy body bags than in securing South Vietnam's villages.

A Better War is unique among...



We Were Soldiers Once...and Young
Harold G. Moore
034547581X
Nov 2004
Paperback
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Review
“A GUT-WRENCHING ACCOUNT OF WHAT WAR IS REALLY ALL ABOUT, which should be ‘must’ reading for all Americans, especially those who have been led to believe that war is some kind of Nintendo game.”
–GENERAL H. NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF

“Hal Moore and Joe Galloway have captured the terror and exhilaration, the comradeship and self-sacrifice, the brutality and compassion that are the dark heart of war.”
–NEIL SHEEHAN, author of A Bright Shining Lie

“A powerful and epic story . . . This is the best account of infantry combat I have ever read, and the most significant book to come out of the Vietnam War.”
–COLONEL DAVID HACKWORTH, author of the bestseller About Face

Book Description
Each year, the...


Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam Ware by Black Veterans
Wallace Terry
0345311973
January 1985
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
"Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
The national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special test of patriotism they faced. Told in voices no reader will soon forget, BLOODS is a must-read for anyone who wants to put the Vietnam experience in historical, cultural, and political perspective.
Cited by THE NEW YORK TIMES as One of the Notable Books of the Year
"Superb."
TIME

From the Publisher
As a senior in high school I took a class on the History of the Vietnam War. ...


Falling Through the Earth : A Memoir
Danielle Trussoni
0805077324
February 21, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Trussoni's memoir tells many potentially interesting stories: of her father's traumatic experiences as a Vietnam tunnel rat; of her own smalltown Wisconsin childhood in the 1980s with a volatile dad; of her flirtations with delinquency; and of her family history of implied criminal links (involving "the Italian mafia, drug smuggling, and a Chicago pizza joint"). As Trussoni's sister suggests, these are all stories of unconventional lives worthy of "an episode on Jerry Springer." Alas, the book Trussoni has produced, while well-crafted, as befits an Iowa Writers' Workshop alum and award winner, is deadly dull. Told in fashionably nonlinear style, these juxtaposed tales become a hodge-podge shoving the reader about, from hanging out at Roscoe's bar with Trussoni's father, to purchasing a notebook, to getting a bad...


Dead Center: A Marine Sniper's Two-Year Odyssey in the Vietnam War
Ed Kugler
0804118752
May 1999
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
WHEN YOU'RE IN THE DEATH BUSINESS,
EACH DAWN COULD BE YOUR LAST.

Raw, straightforward, and powerful, Ed Kugler's account of his two years as a Marine scout-sniper in Vietnam vividly captures his experiences there--the good, the bad, and the ugly. After enlisting in the Marines at seventeen, then being wounded in Santo Domingo during the Dominican crisis, Kugler arrived in Vietnam in early 1966.

As a new sniper with the 4th Marines, Kugler picked up bush skills while attached to 3d Force Recon Company, and then joined the grunts. To take advantage of that experience, he formed the Rogues, a five-sniper team that hunted in the Co Bi-Than Tan Valley for VC and NVA. His descriptions of long, tense waits, sudden deadly action, and NVA countersniper ambushes are fascinating.

In DEAD CENTER, Kugler...


Dispatches
Michael Herr
0679735259
Aug 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Michael Herr, who wrote about the Vietnam War for Esquire magazine, gathered his years of notes from his front-line reporting and turned them into what many people consider the best account of the war to date, when published in 1977. He captured the feel of the war and how it differed from any theater of combat ever fought, as well as the flavor of the time and the essence of the people who were there. Since Dispatches was published, other excellent books have appeared on the war--may we suggest The Things They Carried, The Sorrow of War, We Were Soldiers Once ... and Young--but Herr's book was the first to hit the target head-on and remains a classic.

From Publishers Weekly
American correspondent Herr's documentary recalls the heavy combat he witnessed in...


Journal of Patrick Seamus Flaherty: United States Marine Corps, Khe Sanh, Vietnam, 1968
Ellen Emerson White
0439148901
June 2002
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 6-9-Patrick turned down college scholarships to enlist in the Marines. In December 1967, just out of basic training, he finds himself in Vietnam, "on a combat base, out in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by mountains, and jungle-and- a whole lot of enemy soldiers." His journal is an intense and vivid record of the loneliness, confusion, comradeship, and suffering during the four months spent under constant assault by the North Vietnamese at Khe Sanh. Naive and provincial, the teen is transformed and matured by combat. He develops a close friendship with Bebop, a Detroit jazz musician, and begins to question whether he and his comrades are actually accomplishing anything. "Too much shelling, too many mortar attacks, too many casualties. Not enough food, water, and mail." Patrick writes that he doesn't...


Six Silent Men
Gary A. Linderer
0804115672
Sept 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
"The Eyes and Ears of the Screaming Eagles . . ."

By 1969, the NVA had grown more experienced at countering the tactics of the long range patrols, and SIX SILENT MEN: Book Three describes some of the fiercest fighting Lurps saw during the war. Based on his own experience and extensive interviews with other combat vets of the 101st's Lurp companies, Gary Linderer writes this final, heroic chapter in the seven bloody years that Lurps served God and country in Vietnam. These tough young warriors--grossly outnumbered and deep in enemy territory--fought with the guts, tenacity, and courage that have made them legends in the 101st.

Inside Flap Copy
"The Eyes and Ears of the Screaming Eagles . . ."

By 1969, the NVA had grown more experienced at countering the...


Understanding Vietnam
Neil L. Jamieson
0520201574
March 10, 1995
Paperback
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Leonard Bushkoff, Asian Wall Street Journal Weekly
"Quite simply the most insightful interpretation of Vietnam ever to appear anywhere. No other book touches such vital issues; no other book explains so much; no other book is as important."

Herbert Mitgang, New York Times
"Discloses what the American military and political leadership largely misunderstood: the nature of Vietnamese society, the confrontation with colonialism and Western values, the resistance of the intellectuals, and the culture of the people."

See all Editorial Reviews

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