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Endurance
Frank Arthur Worsley
0393319946
Feb 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
"If we were killed, at least we had done everything in our power to bring help to our shipmates. Shackleton was right. Our chance was a very small one indeed, but it was up to us to take it."

The voyage of HMS Endurance is legendary in the annals of polar exploration. In August 1914 the ship set sail for Antarctica, where she became trapped in the pack ice and eventually sank. The last of her stranded men were not rescued until August 30, 1916. Originally published in 1931, this tale by F.A. Worsley, captain of the Endurance, captures all the tension of the doomed expedition. Written in the first person, Worsley's prose makes you feel as if you were struggling alongside him as he watches two icebergs plowing their way through the pack ice toward their camp; desperately slides down an icy mountainside in pitch...



Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
Alfred Lansing
078670621X
April 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
In the summer of 1914, Sir Ernest Shackleton set off aboard the Endurance bound for the South Atlantic. The goal of his expedition was to cross the Antarctic overland, but more than a year later, and still half a continent away from the intended base, the Endurance was trapped in ice and eventually was crushed. For five months Shackleton and his crew survived on drifting ice packs in one of the most savage regions of the world before they were finally able to set sail again in one of the ship's lifeboats. Alfred Lansing's Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage is a white-knuckle account of this astounding odyssey. Through the diaries of team members and interviews with survivors, Lansing reconstructs the months of terror and hardship the Endurance crew suffered. In October of 1915, there "were no...


The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary Antarctic Expedition
Caroline Alexander
0375404031
November 1998
Hardcover
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Book Review
Melding superb research and the extraordinary expedition photography of Frank Hurley, The Endurance by Caroline Alexander is a stunning work of history, adventure, and art which chronicles "one of the greatest epics of survival in the annals of exploration." Setting sail as World War I broke out in Europe, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, led by renowned polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, hoped to become the first to cross the Antarctic continent. But their ship, Endurance, was trapped in the drifting pack ice, eventually to splinter, leaving the expedition stranded on floes--a situation that seemed "not merely desperate but impossible."

Most skillfully Alexander constructs the expedition's character through its personalities--the cast of veteran explorers, scientists, and crew--with aid from many previously...



The North Pole Was Here: Puzzles and Perils at the Top of the World
Andrew Revkin
0753459930
April 22, 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Gr. 6-9. Published in association with the New York Times, this title chronicles environmental reporter Revkin's trip to the North Pole, where he shadowed a research team studying the relationship between the dwindling ice cap and global warming. Full-color photos and other images support Revkin's cogent discussions of polar history and science, but readers are likely to be most impressed by the vivid travel details; Revkin arrives armed with pencils (ink freezes), pocket warmers to insulate his laptop battery, and a cautious respect for the mercurial ice underfoot. Excerpts from theTimes tend to disrupt the flow of Revkin's central narrative, and the concluding resource listing is conspicuously dominated by citations to articles from the media giant's archives. Still, the firsthand perspectives give this...


Where Mountains Are Nameless
Jonathan Waterman
0393052192
May 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
There's little new in this overview of the current state of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) by Alaska adventurer Waterman (Arctic Crossing), who considers what remains of Alaska's pristine northern wilderness: fragile land is threatened, caribou herds are dwindling and oil companies are despoiling whatever they touch. Others have imparted impassioned observations of this kind, most recently Rick Bass in Caribou Crossing. Still, two qualities recommend this memorable depiction of a barren land's stark and precarious beauty. The first is the author's easy familiarity with the region, which he has trekked and paddled through for 20 years, bearing explicit witness to the destructive effects of oil exploration outside the ANWR. The second is Waterman's sense of history: laced through the reflective account...


Endurance
Alfred Lansing
0842308245
April 1999
Paperback
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We Die Alone: A WWII Epic of Escape and Endurance
David Howarth, Stephen E. Ambrose (Introduction)
1558219730
August 1, 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
If this story of espionage and survival were a novel, readers might dismiss the Shackleton-like exploits of its hero as too fantastic to be taken seriously. But respected historian David Howarth confirmed the details of Jan Baalsrud's riveting tale. It begins in the spring of 1943, with Norway occupied by the Nazis and the Allies desperate to open the northern sea lanes to Russia. Baalsrud and three compatriots plan to smuggle themselves into their homeland by boat, spend the summer recruiting and training resistance fighters, and launch a surprise attack on a German air base. But he's betrayed shortly after landfall, and a quick fight leaves Baalsrud alone and trapped on a freezing island above the Arctic Circle. He's poorly clothed (one foot is entirely bare), has a head start of only a few hundred yards on his Nazi...


In the Land of White Death
Valerian Albanov
067978361X
Sept 2001
(Paperback) - Expanded Ed.
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Book Review
In the early 20th-century era of daring polar exploration, the less-trumpeted fishing and hunting expeditions went largely unrecorded. Except, that is, for a recently discovered tale about a Russian hunter and his shipmate. Valerian Albanov's account of his 18-month-long survival in the Siberian Arctic remained unknown until a group of polar-literature enthusiasts rediscovered it in 1997. Translated into English for the first time, In the Land of White Death competes with the adventures of famed heroes Robert Falcon Scott, Apsley Cherry-Garrard, and Ernest Shackleton. And like Scott's and Cherry-Garrard's narratives, Albanov's tale is penned from a diary he kept during his remarkable ordeal. Albanov's epic begins in 1914, after he leaves the Saint Anna, a sailing vessel bound for Vladivostok and new hunting territory, 7,000...


Shackleton's Way: Leadership Lessons from the Great Antarctic Explorer
Margot Morrell
0142002364
August 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
The explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton has recently become the legendary character at the center of a renewed fascination with the early days of Antarctic exploration. Though not the most renowned explorer of his day, nor even the most successful in terms of stated goals, Shackleton's story of adventurous ambition, incredible endurance, and heroic survival against all odds is indeed the stuff of legend. And now, thanks to the detailed research and helpful insights of Morrell and Capparell, his story is also the meaty material of lessons on how to lead with authority, integrity, humor, and compassion.

A British explorer once summarized the feats of the great Antarctic explorer like this: "For a joint scientific and geographical piece of organization, give me Scott; for a winter journey, give me Wilson, for a dash to the Pole...



The Last Imaginary Place
Robert McGhee
0195183681
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The myth of the Arctic as an untouched wilderness penetrated only by the most intrepid of adventurers and populated by primitive peoples who had to be tamed along with their wilderness takes a beating in this refreshing primer from McGhee, the curator of Arctic Archeology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Coupling personal memoir with a broad historical overview, McGhee's book offers a more realistic view of the present-day Arctic and shows that, far from being cut off from the rest of the world, the Arctic peoples traded with their southern neighbors for thousands of years and have both influenced and been influenced by these contacts. McGhee draws on his 30 years experience as an archeologist to demonstrate that large-scale human migrations have occurred around the entire North Polar region, particularly...


March of the Penguins : Companion to the Major Motion Picture
Luc Jacquet, et al
0792261828
November 8, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Moviegoers can relive the excitement of watching the emperor penguins' life cycle with this companion book to the second most popular documentary in American film history and the highest-grossing natural history film of all time. Actually, this fine book works as a stand-alone volume, thanks to its charming photographs and revealing text. As fans of the movie know, the emperor penguins have been trekking hundreds of miles from the sea to their breeding grounds in Antarctica every year for millennia. They do this against 150-mile-an-hour winds and in minus 70 degree temperatures, dodging predatory birds and other dangers, in an attempt to create a safe environment for their babies. Filmmaker Jacquet capably relays the wonder of this natural ritual, revealing, for instance, that each penguin has a distinct vocal...


Last Place on Earth: Scott and Amundsen's Race to the South Pole
Roland Huntford
0375754741
September 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
On December 14, 1911, the classical age of polar exploration ended when Norway's Roald Amundsen conquered the South Pole. His competitor for the prize, Britain's Robert Scott, arrived one month later--but died on the return with four of his men only 11 miles from their next cache of supplies. But it was Scott, ironically, who became the legend, Britain's heroic failure, "a monument to sheer ambition and bull-headed persistence. His achievement was to perpetuate the romantic myth of the explorer as martyr, and ... to glorify suffering and self-sacrifice as ends in themselves." The world promptly forgot about Amundsen.

Biographer Ronald Huntford's attempt to restore Amundsen to glory, first published in 1979 under the title Scott and Amundsen, has been thawed as part of the Modern Library Exploration series,...



The South Pole
Roald E. Amundsen, et al
0815411278
January 2001
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This adventure harks back to the days when men were menAeven in mittens! Captain Amundsen was the leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole, on December 14, 1911. His account was originally published as two volumes in 1913 and is here reproduced in a single package for the first time. Amundsen and his team endured frostbite, snow blindness, and other horrors, all of which are well chronicled here. The text is supported by many monochrome photos, maps, and charts. This also includes a new introduction by Amundsen's biographer Roland Huntford. Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Roals Amundsen (1872-1928), the foremost polar explorer, records his race to be the first man to reach the South Pole.

See all...


Ada Blackjack
Jennifer Niven
078688746X
Nov 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The beauty of Niven's tale (after The Ice Master) reveals itself slowly, in hard-to-find bits and pieces, mirroring the piecemeal dawning of dread that blanketed the book's five protagonists one winter in 1923 on a bleak Arctic island. The explorers four young white men from the U.S. and Canada and Ada, a 23-year-old Inuit woman set out under a Canadian flag to claim a barren rock in the tundra north of the new Soviet Union for the British Empire. But with a lack of proper funding; a grandstanding, do-nothing Svengali of a leader; and an inexperienced crew, the mission was doomed from the start. Niven's hero is the slight, shy Blackjack, who, though neither as worldly wise as her companions nor as self-sufficient, learns to take care of herself and a dying member of her party after the team is trapped by ice for...


Journey Into the Arctic
Bryan Alexander
0195220056
Sept 2003
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 1-5-Traveling by dogsled, snowmobile, reindeer sled, and nuclear-powered icebreaker, the authors of this book embark on a fantastic journey through the stark beauty of the lands and waters of the Arctic Circle. The trek begins in a small village in Greenland and wends its way through Arctic Canada, Siberia, and ultimately to the top of the Earth-the ice-covered waters that surround the North Pole. Along the way, children meet various inhabitants of this harsh land, catching glimpses of lives that involve hunting and fishing for food, building igloos for temporary shelter, and leading a nomadic existence among herds of reindeer. All manner of animals are also introduced, including ringed seals, musk oxen, and snowy owls. The superb, full-color photographs alone are reason enough to enjoy this book; the...


Leading at the Edge: Leadership Lessons from the Extraordinary Saga of Shackleton's Antarctic Expedition
Dennis N. Perkins
0814405436
January 2000
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Although their experiences may sometimes seem torturous, most managers aren't facing dangerous or life-threatening conditions. Even so, argues consultant Perkins, they would do well to learn from both triumphant and failed expeditions. A former Marine lieutenant, Perkins introduces 10 key concepts he believes are essential to productive leadership with lively anecdotes from the adverse but ultimately successful expedition to the South Pole led by Ernest Shackleton in 1914 (his entire crew survived on the ice with almost no supplies or hope for rescue after their ship drifted off course and was crushed), which he contrasts with a disastrous Canadian expedition launched at almost the same time. Among the principles in the book's first half: "Minimize status differences and insist on courtesy and mutual respect";...


Shackleton's Boat Journey
Frank Arthur Worsley
0393318648
Oct 1998
Paperback
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The New Yorker
This remarkable book... shows [Shackleton] both luckless and lucky, and supremely cool and courageous throughout. Worsley writes without heroics... but makes us feel to the marrow the conditions that the party endured before all hands were rescued.

San Francisco Chronicle, Paul McHugh, 17 September 1998
[L]ucid prose leavened by dry British wit.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Ice Master: The Doomed 1913 Voyage of the Karluk
Jennifer Niven
0786884460
October 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
Eighty-five years after a famous but ill-equipped Canadian Arctic expedition of 1913 had sacrificed 16 lives, some artifacts appeared on an Internet auction site. They had originated at a "ghost camp," discovered in 1924, where four of the expedition's 28 men, one woman, and two children had perished. Jennifer Niven has completed the unfulfilled mission of survivor William McKinlay to produce a "more honest and revealing account" of the wreck of the Karluk and its aftermath.

The explorers became split into several dispersed groups living "in the shadow of death." Their simultaneously grim and gruesome experiences are interwoven in this minutely detailed and atmospheric retelling, created by combining and comparing firsthand accounts and other sources. The characters are vividly re-created, from the expedition's...



Fields of Honor : Pivotal Battles of the Civil War
Edwin C. Bearss, James Mcpherson (Introduction)
0792275683
May 2, 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Bearss presents the story of the Civil War as he has in the battlefield tours he has conducted for many years. A former chief historian of the National Parks Service, he chronicles 14 crucial battles, including Fort Sumter, Shiloh, Antietam, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Chattanooga, Sherman's march through the Carolinas, and Appomattox, the battles ranging between 1861 and 1865; included is an introductory chapter describing John Brown's raid in October 1859. Bearss relates the details of terrain and tactics and of personalities and command decisions; he personalizes generals and politicians, sergeants and privates. The text is augmented by 80 black-and-white photographs and 19 maps. A chance to tour battlefields without leaving home. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights...


Rescue at the Top of the World
Shawn Shallow
093983765X
Mar 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The command was simple: "Our orders are to make as far north as we can by sea, then land a rescue party to travel overland to the whalers. We're to collect reindeer on the way to sustain the men on our arrival." Silence followed this short speech, as the men of the Revenue Cutter Service-the predecessor of the United States Coast Guard- immediately recognized the rescue mission bordered on suicide. It was winter 1897, and they were being asked to make an unprecedented, 1,500-mile overland expedition through the Alaskan territory, in which temperatures would often dip as low as 50 degrees below zero. No matter, that plan would be the only way to save the 300 whalers trapped at Point Barrow, the northernmost tip of North America. Without more food, those men had little chance of surviving until summer, when their...


South: The Endurance Expedition
Ernest Henry Shackleton
0451198808
March 1999
Mass Market Paperback
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Race to the Pole
Ranulph Fiennes
1401300472
Nov 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"We are weak, writing is difficult, but... I do not regret this journey," quotes Fiennes from one of the last letters of Capt. Robert Scott, who reached the South Pole in the summer of 1912 and then perished on the return trip. For generations of Englishmen, Scott was a hero. In the late 1970s, however, a bestselling biography called Scott's exploits into question and his reputation suffered. In this finely honed and riveting account of adventure, death and betrayal, Fiennes, who was the first man to reach both poles by land, seeks to reclaim Scott's place in the pantheon of great and honorable explorers. Fiennes details the tortuous conditions and grim reality of Antarctic exploration at the turn of the last century. Throughout the ordeal, Scott showed leadership, compassion and an unquenchable will to live....


Mawson's Will: The Greatest Polar Survival Story Ever Written
Lennard Bickel
1586420003
February 2000
Paperback
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The Explorer's Club
One of the Ten Best Books of Twentieth-Century Exploration

Book Description
MAWSON'S WILL is the dramatic story of what Sir Edmund Hillary calls "the most outstanding solo journey ever recorded in Antarctic history." For weeks in Antarctica, Douglas Mawson faced some of the most daunting conditions ever known to man: blistering wind, snow, and cold; loss of his companion, his dogs and supplies, the skin on his hands and the soles of his feet; thirst, starvation, disease, snowblindness - and he survived.
Sir Douglas Mawson is remembered as the young Australian who would not go to the South Pole with Robert Scott in 1911, choosing instead to lead his own expedition on the less glamorous mission of charting nearly 1,500 miles of Antarctic coastline and claiming...


Wild Ice: Antarctic Journeys
Ron Naveen, et al
0874743958
November 1990
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Naturalist Naveen and three additional photographers made, between them, more than 60 trips to the Antarctic. This book is a record of their images and reflections on the most hostile, remote, and beautiful place on earth. The photographs are of the quality of most Smithsonian works, including close-ups of animals and colorful sunsets highlighting iceflows and glaciers. The text, in a well-written travelog style, offers reliable natural history information. A good purchase for general collections and secondary school libraries.- Mary J. Nickum, Fish & Wildlife Reference Svce., Bethesda, Md.Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.


Worst Journey in the World
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
0786704373
June 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
As Apsley Cherry-Garrard states in his introduction to the harrowing story of the Scott expedition to the South Pole, "Polar Exploration is at once the cleanest and most isolated way of having a bad time which has been devised." Cherry-Garrard's The Worst Journey in the World is a gripping account of an expedition gone disastrously wrong. The youngest member of Scott's team, the author was later part of the rescue party that eventually found the frozen bodies of Scott and three men who had accompanied Scott on the final push to the Pole. These deaths would haunt Cherry-Garrard for the rest of his life as he questioned the decisions he had made and the actions he had taken in the days leading up to the Polar Party's demise. Prior to this sad denouement, Cherry-Garrard's account is filled with details of...


Balto and the Great Race (Stepping Stone)
Elizabeth Cody Kimmel
0679891986
December 21, 1999
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5-Kimmel presents the legendary story of the part-husky/part-wolf sled dog that braved severe blizzard conditions to take antitoxin serum to a remote Alaskan village in 1925. When the town was stricken by a diphtheria epidemic, Balto overcame unbelievable obstacles to accomplish what other dogs could not. This heroic canine has been immortalized in statue, film, and now in a book that brings his story to life. Kimmel's writing deftly combines geography, sled racing, and historical background with the gripping adventure of Balto's race to save lives. In many ways, the book reads like fast-paced fiction. Koerber's service- able black-and-white illustrations appear throughout and reflect the action. Sure to appeal to beginning chapter-book readers.Christy Norris Blanchette, Valley Cottage Library, NY...


The Worst Journey in the World
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
0143039385
Jan 2006
Paperback
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The New York Review of Books
The Worst Journey in the World is to travel writing what War and Peace is to the novel... a masterpiece.

Book Description
The Worst Journey in the World recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that...

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