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Australia
David Petersen
0516263722
September 1998
Paperback
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Card catalog description
A brief intoduction to the geography, history, wildlife, and people of Australia. --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.


The Songlines
Bruce Chatwin
0140094296
June 1, 1988
Paperback
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Book Review
The late Bruce Chatwin carved out a literary career as unique as any writer's in this century: his books included In Patagonia, a fabulist travel narrative, The Viceroy of Ouidah, a mock-historical tale of a Brazilian slave-trader in 19th century Africa, and The Songlines, his beautiful, elegiac, comic account of following the invisible pathways traced by the Australian aborigines. Chatwin was nothing if not erudite, and the vast, eclectic body of literature that underlies this tale of trekking across the outback gives it a resonance found in few other recent travel books. A poignancy, as well, since Chatwin's untimely death made The Songlines one of his last books.

From Publishers Weekly
PW praised Chatwin's "entertaining" and "resonant" reflections on...


The Road from Coorain
Jill Ker Conway
0679724362
Aug 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
There is a clarity, elegance, and beauty to Conway's Road to Coorain that places it firmly at the apogee of autobiography along with such masterpieces as West With the Night by Beryl Markham, or An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard. From the first sentence, you will be drawn inexorably into the story of her childhood in New South Wales, Australia, and her gradual discovery of--and by--the larger world: the clarity of Conway's language satisfies like cold clear water after a day in the desert: the rhythm of her sentences has a timelessness and expansiveness akin to the Australian landscape itself. This is very likely a book you will remember the rest of your life. Highly Recommended.

From Publishers Weekly
At age 11, Conway ( Women Reformers and American Culture ) left the...


Fatal Shore: The Epic of Australia's Founding
Robert Hughes
0394753666
February 1988
Paperback
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Book Review
An extraordinary volume--even a masterpiece--about the early history of Australia that reads like the finest of novels. Hughes captures everything in this complex tableau with narrative finesse that drives the reader ever-deeper into specific facts and greater understanding. He presents compassionate understanding of the plights of colonists--both freemen and convicts--and the Aboriginal peoples they displaced. One of the very best works of history I have ever read. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal
For 80 years between 1788 and 1868 England transported its convicts to Australia. This punishment provided the first immigrants and the work force to build the colony. Using diaries, letters, and original sources, Hughes meticulously...


The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific
J. Maarten Troost
0767915305
June 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
At 26, Troost followed his wife to Kiribati, a tiny island nation in the South Pacific. Virtually ignored by the rest of humanity (its erstwhile colonial owners, the Brits, left in 1979), Kiribati is the kind of place where dolphins frolic in lagoons, days end with glorious sunsets and airplanes might have to circle overhead because pigs occupy the island's sole runway. Troost's wife was working for an international nonprofit; the author himself planned to hang out and maybe write a literary masterpiece. But Kiribati wasn't quite paradise. It was polluted, overpopulated and scorchingly sunny (Troost could almost feel his freckles mutating into something "interesting and tumorous"). The villages overflowed with scavengers and recently introduced, nonbiodegradable trash. And the Kiribati people seemed excessively...


Ancient Hawaii
Herb Kawainui Kane (Illustrator)
0943357020
August 8, 1998
Paperback
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From the Publisher
Joseph Kennedy review currently attached to Ancient Hawaii on Amazon.com web site. Another review is on www.hawaiibooks.com. A review is being sent to you by teacher Bill Taylor. Ancient Hawaii has also been reviewed by two Honolulu newspapers and a Hawaii Island newspaper.

Book Description
How ancient Polynesian explorers found the Hawaiian Islands, the most remote in Earth's largest sea; how they navigated, how they viewed themselves and their universe, and the arts, crafts, and values by which they survived and prospered without metals or the fuels and inventions believed necessary for life today.

See all Editorial Reviews


A Concise History of New Zealand
Philippa Mein Smith
0521542286
Aug 2005
Paperback
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Review
“Mein Smith's addition to the publisher's “Concise Histories” series is an exceptionally well-written, well-documented analysis of New Zealand's remarkable development from its earliest Maori beginnings through the discovery and settlement by Pakehas (Europeans) to the present...Helpful maps, illustrations, glossary, chronology, and bibliography make this an excellent undergraduate/graduate supplement...Highly recommended.” -CHOICE, W.W. Reinhardt, Randolph-Macon College

Book Description
In this new account of New Zealand's history, Philippa Mein Smith considers the rugged and dynamic land from its break from Gondwana 80 million years ago to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Mein Smith highlights the effects of the country's small size and isolation, from ...


Terra Australis to Australia
Glyndwr Williams, Alan Frost
0195549082


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Book Description
Ever since classical times, when men first imagined a great continent in the southern hemisphere, the idea of Terra Australia has kept a strong hold on the European imagination. This superbly illustrated volume--featuring 60 color and 100 black-and-white plates--provides a comprehensive
history of those various ideas, from earliest times to the present day.
In an informative introductory chapter, the editors set out the various theories and speculations that have been floated over the centuries; and successive chapters describe the expeditions and discoveries accomplished by the British, Portuguese, and Dutch. The Dieppe maps, which mark the
continent as a Portuguese discovey, are reproduced in their entirety for the first time. Two final chapters cover the exploration of New South Wales and the gradual...


Batavia's Graveyard: The True Story Of The Mad Heretic Who Led History's Bloodiest Mutiny
Mike Dash
0609807161
May 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
In 1629, the Dutch merchantman Batavia grounded on a desolate atoll near Western Australia. Of the 200 survivors, 115 were subsequently murdered, in coldest blood, by a group of the ship's sailors and their psychopathic leader, Jeronimus Corneliszoon. Batavia's Graveyard is Mike Dash's unnerving, measured account of the incident. The victims included children, babies, and pregnant women; the crimes took place over a period of several months. Though the killings make a substantial, chilling tale in themselves, Dash adroitly places the shocking spree in larger context with illuminating discussions of 17th century medical practices, religious heresy, global politics, and shipboard sociology and daily life. Additionally, he draws dozens of portraits of the participants in this ghastly drama, most fascinatingly that of...


Wobblies!
Paul Buhle
1844675254
Apr 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
Imagine being a workers' rights activist at the time of the Industrial Revolution. As shown in Wobblies!: A Graphic History of the Industrial Workers of the World, you had to have resolve as steely as anything produced on the factory floor. It's slightly ironic, then, to have these heroic, life-and-death tales of class warfare captured in the ephemeral medium of a comic book. Created as a collaboration between historians and graphic novelists, it is an engaging, informative, and sometimes uneven look at a time of violent social upheaval. The editors of this collection assume that their readers are at least somewhat familiar with the history of the Wobblies--this is not a children's primer. Many entries are similar, filled with pedantic text, but two in particular are superb, harnessing the potential power of the graphic...


Aboriginal Art of Australia: Exploring Cultural Traditions (Art Around the World)
Carol Finley
0822520761
March 1999
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Grade 5 Up-Finley examines paintings of several clans and regions of Australia. Artistic methods and the use of materials such as wood, bark, and rock are carefully explained. Because Aboriginal myth and views about land are tied directly to the art, the author includes a discussion of these beliefs and their relationship to the paintings. She also discusses the flowering of modern Aboriginal art associated with the movement for equality and land rights. Clear, full-color photographs of the art, people, and landscape illustrate the text.Kathryn Kosiorek, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Brooklyn, OH Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Card catalog description
Describes the art of the Australian Aborigines including rock painting and engraving as well as sand and...


In a Sunburned Country
Bill Bryson
0767903862
May 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
Bill Bryson follows his Appalachian amble, A Walk in the Woods, with the story of his exploits in Australia, where A-bombs go off unnoticed, prime ministers disappear into the surf, and cheery citizens coexist with the world's deadliest creatures: toxic caterpillars, aggressive seashells, crocodiles, sharks, snakes, and the deadliest of them all, the dreaded box jellyfish. And that's just the beginning, as Bryson treks through sunbaked deserts and up endless coastlines, crisscrossing the "under-discovered" Down Under in search of all things interesting.

Bryson, who could make a pile of dirt compelling--and yes, Australia is mostly dirt--finds no shortage of curiosities. When he isn't dodging Portuguese man-of-wars or considering the virtues of the remarkable platypus, he visits southwest Gippsland, home of the world's...



Australia
Barry Penney
1558687742
Sept 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Culture Smart! is a new series of travel guides written for the traveler on the go. Each volume is a quick, accurate guide to customs and etiquette. Outstanding features of CULTURE SMART! * All the essential cultural and etiquette points are covered, making you confident in a variety of situations. * You will know what to expect in each particular culture. * You will learn how to behave in specific social and business situations. * Essential attitudes and values are clearly explained. * You will find each topic a quick, easy read due to the concise writing style. * Laid out in a clear and easy-to-read format. * Each book has the same look, page count, and organization for reference use. * Small and light, it tucks into your pocket or purse for on-the-go use. * Your Culture Smart! books are written by a staff of...


In a Sunburned Country [UNABRIDGED]
Bill Bryson (Narrator)
055350259X
June 6, 2000
Audio CD
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Book Review
Bill Bryson follows his Appalachian amble, A Walk in the Woods, with the story of his exploits in Australia, where A-bombs go off unnoticed, prime ministers disappear into the surf, and cheery citizens coexist with the world's deadliest creatures: toxic caterpillars, aggressive seashells, crocodiles, sharks, snakes, and the deadliest of them all, the dreaded box jellyfish. And that's just the beginning, as Bryson treks through sunbaked deserts and up endless coastlines, crisscrossing the "under-discovered" Down Under in search of all things interesting.

Bryson, who could make a pile of dirt compelling--and yes, Australia is mostly dirt--finds no shortage of curiosities. When he isn't dodging Portuguese man-of-wars or considering the virtues of the remarkable platypus, he visits southwest Gippsland, home of the world's...



From Nothing to Zero
Lonely Planet Publications
1740596684
Apr 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
From Nothing to Zero presents edited extracts from letters written by asylum seekers held in Australia’s detention centres. These letters provide a rare glimpse into the world of refugees who have fled war and persecution in their own countries. Several of the contributing detainees have been held for more than three years, often with no end to their incarceration in sight.

This compelling book gives voice to people whose thoughts and experiences are only rarely heard.


Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed
Jared Diamond
0670033375
December 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
Jared Diamond's Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed is the glass-half-empty follow-up to his Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs, and Steel. While Guns, Germs, and Steel explained the geographic and environmental reasons why some human populations have flourished, Collapse uses the same factors to examine why ancient societies, including the Anasazi of the American Southwest and the Viking colonies of Greenland, as well as modern ones such as Rwanda, have fallen apart. Not every collapse has an environmental origin, but an eco-meltdown is often the main catalyst, he argues, particularly when combined with society's response to (or disregard for) the coming disaster. Still, right from the outset of Collapse, the author makes clear that this is not a mere environmentalist's diatribe. He begins by setting the book's main question...


Lonely Planet Australia (Lonely Planet Travel Guides Series)
Paul Smitz
1740597400
November 2005
Paperback
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The Lost Ships of Guadalcanal: Exploring the Ghost Fleet of the South Pacific
Robert D. Ballard, Rick Archbold
0446516368


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From Booklist
Dozens of battered warships lie beneath the constricted waters off Guadalcanal, justifying the macabre moniker of Iron Bottom Sound. Unseen for 50 years, this submarine battlefield received its first visitor in 1992, aquanaut Robert Ballard. The twisted, encrusted shapes he saw are here spread out with the same lavish pictorial formula used in his enormously popular albums on the Titanic and the Bismarck. Prewar photos of battleships in dress regalia contrast graphically with eerie paintings and photos of shell and torpedo strikes that destroyed them and their crews. Now--as in the moment of foundering during the half dozen sharp, short naval battles around the island--guns aim askew, fatal holes gape wide, and turret plates peel back. The Titanic and the Bismarck--both on maiden...


The Story of a Treaty
Claudia Orange
0046410538
Apr 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
This accessible primer on the Treaty of Waitangi takes a fresh look at the treaty's origins, history, and meanings. Relations between the Europeans, Maori, and Pakeha are traced from the earliest years of European settlement to the signing of the treaty in 1840, through the land wars of the 1860s, and on to the present century. Discussed is the treaty's increasing importance as the Maori strive for autonomy and the Pakeha have begun to critically examine their history.

About the Author
Claudia Orange is the deputy editor of the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography and has previously taught history and race relations at Auckland University.


Twilight at Little Round Top : July 2, 1863The Tide Turns at Gettysburg
Glenn W. LaFantasie
0471462314
February 24, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The most celebrated firefight of the Civil War is retold once again in this engaging study. Historian and journalist LaFantasie does a good job narrating the Gettysburg campaign and the course of the battle up to the Little Round Top crisis and, using a wealth of memoirs and diaries, draws colorful profiles of many key participants. The author struggles to find a new angle on this oft-told story, but manages a refreshingly critical attitude and a wider perspective than many recent studies, which have primarily fixated on the exploits of the 20th Maine regiment and its famous commander, Joshua Chamberlain. He corrects some of the mythology that's grown up around this unit-asserting that the 20th didn't run out of ammunition and that its climactic bayonet charge just hurried along a Confederate...


The Pocket Aussie Fact Book
Margaret Nicholson
0143001418
Feb 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
There is always something new to discover about Australia. This handy reference book gives you all the facts & figures in an easy to use format. Filled with information about Australia's history, its currency, its government, its native plants & animals & much more.


Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific by Raft
Thor Heyerdahl
0671726528
May 1990
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
Kon-Tiki is the record of an astonishing adventure -- a journey of 4,300 nautical miles across the Pacific Ocean by raft. Intrigued by Polynesian folklore, biologist Thor Heyerdahl suspected that the South Sea Islands had been settled by an ancient race from thousands of miles to the east, led by a mythical hero, Kon-Tiki. He decided to prove his theory by duplicating the legendary voyage.On April 28, 1947, Heyerdahl and five other adventurers sailed from Peru on a balsa log raft. After three months on the open sea, encountering raging storms, whales, and sharks, they sighted land -- the Polynesian island of Puka Puka.Translated into sixty-five languages, Kon-Tiki is a classic, inspiring tale of daring and courage -- a magnificent saga of men against the sea.Washington Square Press' Enriched Classics present...


Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed
Jared Diamond
0143036556
December 2005
Textbook Paperback
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Book Review
Jared Diamond's Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed is the glass-half-empty follow-up to his Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs, and Steel. While Guns, Germs, and Steel explained the geographic and environmental reasons why some human populations have flourished, Collapse uses the same factors to examine why ancient societies, including the Anasazi of the American Southwest and the Viking colonies of Greenland, as well as modern ones such as Rwanda, have fallen apart. Not every collapse has an environmental origin, but an eco-meltdown is often the main catalyst, he argues, particularly when combined with society's response to (or disregard for) the coming disaster. Still, right from the outset of Collapse, the author makes clear that this is not a mere environmentalist's diatribe. He begins by setting the...


Hell-Hole of the Pacific
Richard Wolfe
0143019872
Jan 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
No settlement in New Zealand can claim a past as colourful and chequered as that of Kororareka, in the Bay of Islands, later to become Russell. In the 1830s it was such a wild place that it earned the name 'hell-hole of the Pacific'. Whalers, sealers, escaped convicts, seamen, and adventurers descended on the little Maori village. Drunkenness, debauchery, grog shops, and the oldest profession proliferated. It rivaled similar settlements around the Pacific, such as Sydney, San Francisco, and Hawaii. Richard Wolfe's new book reminds us that early periods of European settlement were often a torrid and eventful time. Includes a photo insert and maps of the area.


A Concise History of Australia (Cambridge Concise Histories)
Stuart Macintyre
0521601010
August 24, 2004
Paperback
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Review
From reviews of the first edition: 'At long last here is an accessible, sensible, learned and digestible history of Australia. It is a triumph of Stuart Macintyre's notable scholarship that he has come up with a book that is concise - not brief, not abbreviated - sharp and to the point ...this is a tremendously useful tool for locals and outsiders. It should sit on every Australian's bookshelf, next to the dictionary and the atlas.' Nick Richardson, Herald-Sun
'It's a lively, intelligent, opinionated and very well written one-volume history, traversing some well-covered territory of colonial and twentieth-century Australia with a fresh eye that doesn't fail to observe the big and small picture.' David Gaunt, Australian Bookseller & Publisher
'Macintyre has absorbed the considerable corpus of monographic and...


The Founding of New Societies
Louis Hartz
0156327287
Oct 1969
Paperback
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Book Description
Hartz elaborates his widly discussed "fragment theory" of new societies and projects some of its implications for the modern age.


Slipping into Paradise: Why I Live in New Zealand
Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson
0345466349
July 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Should you move to New Zealand? "The short answer," writes Masson in this breathless paean to his adopted home, "is 'Yes.' " Comprising two large islands, New Zealand is "the green gem in the middle of the South Pacific." Its physical beauty will be familiar to anyone who's seen The Lord of the Rings: the country boasts a temperate climate, beautiful beaches, towering mountains, exotic animals and lush vegetation. New Zealand's human inhabitants are just as remarkable, legendary for their modesty and warmth. When Masson, an American psychologist and author (The Pig Who Sang to the Moon, etc.), wants to interview the foreign minister, he finds him in the phone book. When he wants to chat with the country's most famous icon, Sir Edmund Hillary, he simply drops by his home. Though Masson is eager to portray New...


We, the Navigators: The Ancient Art of Landfinding in the Pacific
David Lewis, Derek, Sir Oulton (Editor)
0824815823
July 1994
Paperback
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The Northern Mariner
"Intensely thorough... An exhaustive examination of the pre-European navigational system which should fill any scholar's need... Succeeds admirably."

Geopub Review
"This superb book can be recommended as good literature for both scholar and general reader."

See all Editorial Reviews

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