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German Survival Guide: The Language and Culture You Need to Travel with Confidence in Germany and Austria
Elizabeth Bingham
0970373422
February 2001
Paperback
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Schlepping Through the Alps : My Search for Austria's Jewish Past with Its Last Wandering Shepherd
Sam Apple
0345477731
March 28, 2006
Paperback
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From Booklist
Apple is a Jewish comic writer, and in July 2000 he met Hans in New York. Hans, the son of a Jewish father and Gentile mother, was born in Vienna, became a shepherd, and developed a love for singing Yiddish songs. The following year Apple joined Hans in "schlepping" through various Alpine locations, tape recorder and sheep in hand. His account of that sojourn is whimsical, often hilarious, and often deeply disturbing. For Apple was not merely interested in an eccentric shepherd or in local folk culture. He was fully cognizant of the long tradition of Austrian anti-Semitism and of the role of Austrians in the Holocaust. So, while recounting delightful episodes with Hans and his sheep, as well as interesting observations on the lost world of Yiddish culture, Apple suggests that anti-Semitism maintains a tenacious hold in...


Hungary
Ann Stalcup
0516236830
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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Incompleteness: The Proof and Paradox of Kurt Godel (Great Discoveries)
Rebecca Goldstein
0393051692
February 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
Kurt Gödel is often held up as an intellectual revolutionary whose incompleteness theorem helped tear down the notion that there was anything certain about the universe. Philosophy professor, novelist, and MacArthur Fellow Rebecca Goldstein reinterprets the evidence and restores to Gödel's famous idea the meaning he claimed he intended: that there is a mathematical truth--an objective certainty--underlying everything and existing independently of human thought. Gödel, Goldstein maintains, was an intellectual heir to Plato whose sense of alienation from the positivists and postmodernists of the 1940s was only ameliorated by his friendship with another intellectual giant, Albert Einstein. As Goldstein writes, "That his work, like Einstein's, has been interpreted as not only consistent with the revolt against...


The Austro-Hungarian Forces in World War I 1916-18
Peter Jung
1841765953
Nov 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
The part played in the Great War by the armies of the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy is little known to English-speakers, perhaps because 1918 saw the complete destruction of the Empire. Yet it was of great importance, providing nearly all Central Powers forces on the Italian front, huge numbers on the Russian front, the Balkans and even a contingent in Turkey and Palestine. This second volume describes this complex organisation from the accession of Emperor Karl I in November 1916, through the victory of Caporetto and failure of the Piave offensive, to the final Armistice. The text is supported by tables and insignia charts, and illustrated with rare photographs and colourful plates.

From the Publisher
Packed with specially commissioned artwork, maps and diagrams, the...


Elisabeth of Austria: The Princess Bride (Royal Diaries Series)
Barry Denenberg
0439266440
March 2003
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-8-Although not one of the most influential European royals, Elisabeth is still a fascinating character. As she begins her diary, the 15-year-old reveals her true passions-the outdoors, her family's home called Possenhofen, poetry, her pets, her father, and horseback riding. The household is in a fury as Helene, Elisabeth's older sister, prepares to meet their cousin Franz Joseph I, Emperor of Austria and her potential spouse. Then Mama decides that Elisabeth will accompany them in order to meet the emperor's younger brother. When they arrive, Franz Joseph pays little attention to his intended, but rather is smitten with Elisabeth and selects her as his bride. She is fraught with confusion, joy, and sorrow for her sister. Once she accepts his offer, the young Elisabeth has much to prepare. Six months...


Twilight of the Habsburgs
Alan Palmer
0871136651
Mar 1997
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Palmer (Crowned Cousins) notes in his introduction that there is more to Franz Josef (1830-1916) than his longevity. But considering how many of the emperor's immediate circle died young and/or violently, longevity in this set was a real virtue: Franz Josef's son Rudolf killed himself and his mistress at Mayerling in 1889; his wife, the Empress Elisabeth, was assassinated by an Italian anarchist in 1898; and, most famously, his nephew Franz Ferdinand and his wife were shot to death in 1914 by the Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip. The portrait that emerges from Palmer's descriptions is that of a sad figure left much alone by his unstable wife and of a man very concerned for his empire's survival and for personal honor (his best feature) but, like other wildly inbred Hapsburgs, probably not a very bright bulb. Palmer...


Nazi Hunter: The Wiesenthal File
Alan Levy
1567316875
June 2004
Hardcover
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Florilegium Imperiale: Botanical Illustrations for Francis I of Austria
H. Walter Lack
3791334921
May 30, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Florilegium Imperialis: The Floral Watercolors of Francis I of Austria H. Walter Lack Now available for the first time in book form, this collection of exquisitely rendered flowers presents one of the world’s great collections of botanical illustrations in a deluxe format. Francis I of Austria, the last monarch to rule over the Holy Roman Empire, was also obsessed with flowers. His Imperial Gardens, where he realized his passion for flowers, remain one of Vienna’s most beloved treasures. In 1791, Francis I commissioned Matthias Schumtzer to paint portraits of every flower in the garden—a project that took more than three decades to complete. Until now, only six of the extant 1,300 paintings have ever been published. This collection features one hundred of the most outstanding of Schmutzer’s...


Emil and Karl
Yankev Glatshteyn
1596431199
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Booklist
*Starred Review* Emil and Karl may be "one of the first books about the Holocaust for any age and in any language." So says Jeffrey Shandler, professor of Yiddish Literature and Holocaust Studies at Rutgers University, who has translated the book into English for the first time. The novel, written for children, was published in Yiddish in New York, appearing in February 1940. Its author, a Jewish immigrant from Poland who had written two adult novels, was part of a dynamic Yiddish-speaking community in New York. On a visit home to Poland in 1934, he witnessed growing discrimination against Jews, and he wanted American Jewish children to know about it. Now, long after, translator Shandler fills in what was happening when the book was first published. World War II had begun in 1939, but the U.S. was not yet part of...


The Road to Mayerling
Richard Barkeley
1842126733
May 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
This superbly factual account of the life and death of Austria's Prince Rudolph reads like a fast-paced thriller. The colorful and controversial Prince--the last and most talented of the Hapsburg line--was discovered dead on January 30, 1889, in the royal hunting lodge at Mayerling. Beside him, also dead, lay his mistress, the beautiful young Baroness Mary Vetsera. What happened that day remains a mystery that has evoked endless speculation and countless dramatic re-creations--none more engrossing and entertaining than Barkeley's vivid telling.


Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
Edith Hahn Beer
068817776X
November 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Born to a middle-class, nonobservant Jewish family, Beer was a popular teenager and successful law student when the Nazis moved into Austria. In a well-written narrative that reads like a novel, she relates the escalating fear and humiliating indignities she and others endured, as well as the anti-Semitism of friends and neighbors. Using all their resources, her family bribed officials for exit visas for her two sisters, but Edith and her mother remained, due to lack of money and Edith's desire to be near her half-Jewish boyfriend, Pepi. Eventually, Edith was deported to work in a labor camp in Germany. Anxious about her mother, she obtained permission to return to Vienna, only to learn that her mother was gone. In despair, Edith tore off her yellow star and went underground. Pepi, himself a fugitive, distanced...


Bride of the Wind
Susanne Keegan
0670805130


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From Publishers Weekly
Alma seems to exert an endless fascination on biographers, as she did on the notable men who were her husbands and lovers during her long (1879-1964) and turbulent life. Following Alma Mahler by Francoise Giroud (Nonfiction Forecasts, Jan. 20), this book is much more scholarly--and perhaps a mite less entertaining. It places Alma more firmly in her cultural context, with the turn-of-the-century Viennese scene more richly detailed, and Keegan, a British journalist, had the benefit of conversations with Alma's daughter Anna and her husband. No one ever quite elucidates the mystery of Alma's exotic personality, however--her odd mixture of sensitivity and coarseness, her swoons and intense practicality, her grandeur and pettiness. It is diffcult to bring much fresh insight to bear on her relationships with spouses...


The Habsburg Monarchy, 1809-1918 : A History of the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary
A. J. P. Taylor
0226791459
May 15, 1976
Paperback
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Book Description
First published in 1941, The Habsburg Monarchy has become indispensable to students of nineteenth-century European history. Not only a chronological report of actions and changes, Taylor's work is a provocative exploration into the historical process of the most eventful hundred years of the Habsburg monarchy.



The Fall of the House of Habsburg
Edward Crankshaw
0140064591
Jan 1983
Paperback
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Marie Antoinette, Princess of Versailles, Austria-France 1769
Kathryn Lasky
0439076668
April 2000
Hardcover
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Book Review
"I look up now into the oval mirror and see barely a trace of the mud-splattered girl tearing through the woodland on her horse, or the barefoot girl wading at Schonbrunn... I have become what Mama set out for me to be. Majestic. A Dauphine and eventually a Queen."

So writes the headstrong 13-year-old Maria Antonia--future Queen of France--in her diary on October 23, 1769. In this engrossing addition to the Royal Diaries series (Elizabeth I: Red Rose of the House of Tudor, Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile), Kathryn Lasky invents a diary of the young Marie Antoinette in 1769--the year she is to be married off to Dauphin Louis Auguste, eldest grandson of the French king Louis XV. Arranged marriages were common in that day and age--as the Empress Theresa (of the Holy Roman Empire of the Germanic Nations) sought to...



Concise History of Hungary
Miklos Molnar
0521667364
January 2001
Textbook Paperback
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Review
'Good surveys of Hungarian history are rare. Miklos Molnar's new book is an exception. It is analytical, opinionated, yet reliable - and an enjoyable read as well.' Budapest in Your Pocket Guide
'This book is one of a series of short, well written and authoritative histories of a variety of countries that Cambridge University Press is to be congratulated on publishing ... These books provide a superb introduction for the general reader or a traveller preparing for a visit.' Contemporary Review
'This is an impartial, even-handed, and altogether fair book, a pleasure to read. Molnár sets out to accomplish his task combining the qualities of an author and an academic: he is erudite, inquisitive, investigative, and broad minded. A Concise History of Hungary is a welcome addition to a growing family of shorter histories...


A Nervous Splendor : Vienna 1888-1889
Frederic Morton
014005667X
October 30, 1980
Paperback
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The Habsburgs
Andrew Wheatcroft
0140236341
May 1997
Paperback
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Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914
Frederic Morton
0306810212
April 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In an astonishing work of literary energy and historical insight, the author of The Rothschilds brings us the backstage dynamics that preceded the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, the deed that precipitated WW I. Morton captures both the elegant decadence of Emperor Franz Joseph's Vienna, and the potent spirits of those revolutionary thinkers who, all in Vienna at some time during the two years before the war, would blow away the past and create modernity. There were Stalin, Trotsky and Lenin; Freud and Jung; the glowering Hitler; Kafka, Wittgenstein and Karl Kraus; and a small band of Serb nationalists, one of whom fired the shot that catapulted Franz Joseph, Kaiser Wilhelm and Tsar Nicholas into a war they didn't want but couldn't prevent, and that reduced them to puppets....


Siege of Budapest: One Hundred Days in World War II
Krisztian Ungvary
0300104685
March 2005
Hardcover
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Library Journal
"A gripping story of horror and courage.... This is the finest account of this most dreadful incident...."

Review
“This book provides the first acceptable assessment and analysis of the siege of Budapest, a monumental confrontation during the Second World War. Krisztián Ungváry makes use of a wealth of fresh historical evidence locked until recently in the secret archives of Russia and eastern Germany. He draws on the diaries and personal recollection of survivors, both civilian and soldiers . . . most of whom have never got over their experience. The result is excellent scholarship and gripping reading. . . . [It] deserves to be widely read.”—Thomas Land, Times Literary Supplement


Hungary
Claitors Publishing Division
0160292026
Feb 1991
Hardcover
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Fin-De-Siecle Vienna : Politics and Culture (Vintage)
Carl E. Schorske
0394744780
December 12, 1980
Paperback
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Review
"Not only is it a splendid exploration of several aspects of early modernism in their political context; it is an indicator of how the discipline of intellectual history is currently practiced by its most able and ambitious craftsmen." --David A. Hollinger

Book Description
A landmark book from one of the truly original scholars of our time: a magnificent revelation of turn-of-the-century Vienna where out of a crisis of political and social disintegration so much of modern art and thought was born.

"Not only is it a splendid exploration of several aspects of early modernism in their political context; it is an indicator of how the discipline of intellectual history is currently practiced by its most able and ambitious craftsmen. It is also a moving vindication of historical...


Beyond Nationalism
Istvan Deak
019504505X
Jan 1990
Hardcover
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Book Description
In the last seventy years of its long and distinguished existence, the Habsburg monarchy was plagued by the forces of rising nationalism. Still, it preserved domestic peace and provided the conditions for social, economic, and cultural progress in a vast area inhabited by eleven major
nationalities and almost as many confessional groups. This study investigates the social origin, education, training, code of honor, lifestyle, and political role of the Habsburg officers. Simultaneously conservative and liberal, the officer corps, originally composed mainly of noblemen, willingly
coopted thousands of commoners--among them an extraordinary number of Jews. Even during World War I, the army and its officers endured, surviving the dissolution of the state in October 1918, if only by a few days. The end of the...


The Hungarians: A Thousand Years of Victory in Defeat
Paul Lendvai
0691119694
September 2004
Paperback
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Norman Madarasz , The European Legacy
Lendvai has shown us how our knowledge and memory are a tangle of both [facts and fictions].

Review
Stephen Goode Washington Times : Mr. Lendvai has done a remarkable job. His book is easily the best history of Hungary in English.
Istvan Deak Times Literary Supplement : The writing of national histories is . . . justified by the erudition and intellectual brilliance of the [author].
Anne Gyulai The Montreal Gazette : A sympathetic account of Hungarian history. Yet the book also exposes the blemishes along with the heroism.
Norman Madarasz The European Legacy : Lendvai has shown us how our knowledge and memory are a tangle of both [facts and fictions].

See all Editorial Reviews ...


The Austro-Prussian War : Austria's War with Prussia and Italy in 1866
Geoffrey Wawro
0521629519
September 13, 1997
Paperback
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Review
"The Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871 started the modern Hundred Years' War that did not end until 1945. Professor Geoff Wawro's book is the most comprehensive treatment of the subject. Thoughtful and well written, it is a major contribution to an understanding of history." Henry Kissinger

"The Austro-Prussian War is an outstanding work, illustrating once again that operational military history can make important and enjoyable contributions to understanding the past. A must for undergraduate, graduate, and specialist collections." Choice

"The Austro-Prussian War is an outstanding work, illustrating once again that operational military history can make important and enjoyable contributions to understanding the past. A must for undergraduate, graduate, and specialist collections." Choice

"Geoffrey Wawro's lively and...



Liberal Professions and Illiberal Politics
Maria M. Kovacs
0195085973
June 1997
Hardcover
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Book Description
In this important new historical study, Maria Kovacs examines the struggle between liberal and anti-Semitic policies among professional groups--doctors, lawyers, engineers--in Hungary. Kovacs's main emphasis is on the interwar period when unemployment, expansion of the welfare system, and
competition for state jobs during the Great Depression, combined with crass anti-Semitism on the part of engineers and medical associations, radically altered previously liberal policies of open entry and equal educational opportunity. Liberal Professions and Illiberal Politics analyzes to what
extent these new policies were dictated by authoritarian governments from above and to what extent they originated within the professions themselves. The story ends with the Holocaust, which sealed the fate of those professionals who had...


Berlin Noir: March Violets, the Pale Criminal, a German Requiem
Philip Kerr
0140231706
January 1994
Paperback
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Book Review
Now published in one paperback volume, these three mysteries are exciting and insightful looks at life inside Nazi Germany -- richer and more readable than most histories of the period. We first meet ex-policeman Bernie Gunther in 1936, in March Violets (a term of derision which original Nazis used to describe late converts.) The Olympic Games are about to start; some of Bernie's Jewish friends are beginning to realize that they should have left while they could; and Gunther himself has been hired to look into two murders that reach high into the Nazi Party. In The Pale Criminal, it's 1938, and Gunther has been blackmailed into rejoining the police by Heydrich himself. And in A German Requiem, the saddest and most disturbing of the three books, it's 1947 as Gunther stumbles across a nightmare landscape that conceals even...

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