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The Big House
George Howe Colt
074324964X
June 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The epicenter of the Colt family is the Big House, built in 1903 on Wings Neck, a deserted strip of Cape Cod. It's not only an architectural gem but a device to chronicle family, local history and the culture of Boston Brahmins-and it accomplishes that task with charm, style and solid research. For 42 summers, Colt traveled from winter homes across the U.S. to partake in this magical place. It's where he learned to swim and play tennis, and where he kissed his first girl. Indeed, the Big House has seen five weddings, four divorces, parties, anniversaries and love affairs. The Colts, a once venerable tribe, had lost their money-"it is not wealth so much as former wealth that defines Old Money families"-but were determined to keep their ancestral home. Time may have marched on, but the Big House refused to...


Winthrop's Journal, History of New England, 1630-1649 : Volume 1

1402195990


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Book Description
This Elibron Classics book is a facsimile reprint of a 1908 edition by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York.


The Constant Princess
Philippa Gregory
074327248X
December 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
As youngest daughter to the Spanish monarchs and crusaders King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Catalina, princess of Wales and of Spain, was promised to the English Prince Arthur when she was three. She leaves Spain at 15 to fulfill her destiny as queen of England, where she finds true love with Arthur (after some initial sourness) as they plot the future of their kingdom together. Arthur dies young, however, leaving Catalina a widow and ineligible for the throne. Before his death, he extracts a promise from his wife to marry his younger brother Henry in order to become queen anyway, have children and rule as they had planned, a situation that can only be if Catalina denies that Arthur was ever her lover. Gregory's latest (after Earthly Joys) compellingly dramatizes how Catalina uses her faith, her cunning and her...


Judge Sewall's Apology
Richard Francis
0007163622
Aug 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In this lively chronicle, historian Francis (Transcendental Utopias) offers a compelling portrait of the decline of Puritan ways in the late 17th century and the ascent of a secular spirit in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Although devout, Samuel Sewall (1652–1730) turned away from an early religious vocation to pursue a career in public office and married into the colony's aristocracy. He found himself catapulted into the limelight as one of nine judges who condemned the alleged witches of Salem in 1692. Francis calls this the turning point in Sewall's life and work. Never convinced that the condemned women were guilty, Sewall felt remorse; in 1697 he walked into a Boston church and offered a public apology, the only one of the three judges to do so. As a result, he was rebuffed by his social circle. Yet,...


The Pillars of the Earth
Ken Follett
0451166892
July 1990
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Set in 12th-century England, the narrative concerns the building of a cathedral in the fictional town of Kingsbridge. The ambitions of three men merge, conflict and collide through 40 years of social and political upheaval as internal church politics affect the progress of the cathedral and the fortunes of the protagonists. "Follett has written a novel that entertains, instructs and satisfies on a grand scale," judged PW. Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
A radical departure from Follett's novels of international suspense and intrigue, this chronicles the vicissitudes of a prior, his master builder, and their community as they struggle to build a cathedral and protect themselves during the tumultuous 12th century, when the empress Maud...


The Night Watch
Sarah Waters
159448905X
March 23, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Waters (Fingersmith) applies her talent for literary suspense to WWII-era London in her latest historical. She populates the novel with ordinary people overlooked by history books and sets their individual passions against the chaotic background of extraordinary times. There are Kay, a "night watch" ambulance driver; her lover, Helen; two imprisoned conscientious objectors, upper-class Fraser and working-class Duncan; Duncan's sister, Viv; Viv's married soldier-lover, Reggie; and Julia, a building inspector–cum–mystery novelist. The novel works backward in time, beginning in 1947, as London emerges from the rubble of war, then to 1944, a time of nightly air raids, and finally to 1941, when the war's end was not in sight. Through all the turmoil on the world stage, the characters...


The Other Boleyn Girl
Philippa Gregory
0743227441
June 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Sisterly rivalry is the basis of this fresh, wonderfully vivid retelling of the story of Anne Boleyn. Anne, her sister Mary and their brother George are all brought to the king's court at a young age, as players in their uncle's plans to advance the family's fortunes. Mary, the sweet, blond sister, wins King Henry VIII's favor when she is barely 14 and already married to one of his courtiers. Their affair lasts several years, and she gives Henry a daughter and a son. But her dark, clever, scheming sister, Anne, insinuates herself into Henry's graces, styling herself as his adviser and confidant. Soon she displaces Mary as his lover and begins her machinations to rid him of his wife, Katherine of Aragon. This is only the beginning of the intrigue that Gregory so handily chronicles, capturing beautifully the...


Escaping Salem
Richard Godbeer
0195161297
Oct 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Few events in American history are as well remembered as the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. But there was another witch hunt that year, in Stamford, Connecticut, that has never been examined in depth. Now Richard Godbeer describes this "other witch hunt" in a concise, fascinating narrative that
illuminates the colonial world and shatters the stereotype of early New Englanders as quick to accuse and condemn. That stereotype originates with Salem, which was in many ways unlike other outbreaks of witch-hunting in the region.
Drawing on eye-witness testimony, Godbeer tells the story of Kate Branch, a seventeen-year-old afflicted by strange visions and given to blood-chilling wails of pain and fright. Branch accused several women of bewitching her, two of whom were put on trial for witchcraft. The book takes...


Rough Crossings : Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution
Simon Schama
006053916X
May 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Adam HochschildHas there ever been a patch of history more celebrated than the American Revolution? The torrent is endless: volume after volume about the glory of 1776, the miracle of 1787 and enough biographies of the Founding Fathers to stretch from the Liberty Bell to Bunker Hill and back again. The Library of Congress catalogue lists 271 books or other items to do with George Washington's death and burial alone. Enough!By contrast with the usual hagiography, distinguished historian Schama has found a little-known story from this era that makes the Founding Fathers look not so glorious. The Revolution saw the first mass emancipation of slaves in the Americas—an emancipation, however, not done by the revolutionaries but by their enemies. Many American rebel leaders were slave...


Fleshing Out Skull & Bones
Kris Millegan
0972020721
Oct 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
This chronicle of espionage, drug smuggling, and elitism in Yale University's Skull & Bones society offers rare glimpses into this secret world with previously unpublished documents, photographs, and articles that delve into issues such as racism, financial ties to the Nazi party, and illegal corporate dealings. Contributors include Antony Sutton, author of America's Secret Establishment; Dr. Ralph Bunch, professor emeritus of political science at Portland State University; Webster Griffin Tarpley and Anton Chaitkin, authors and historians; and Howard Altman, editor of the Philadelphia City Paper. A complete list of known members, including George Bush and George W. Bush, and reprints of rare magazine articles on the Order of Skull and Bones are included.

About the Author
Kris...


The Encyclopedia of New England
David Watters
0300100272
September 2005
Textbook Hardcover
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From Booklist
*Starred Review* The Encyclopedia of New England follows in the pattern of previously published state, city, and regional encyclopedias. As with several of the others, this title is the product of a university press, in this case Yale University Press, which carries its own level of scholarly authority. Combining the six states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island is a logical choice. So much of the early history of these states is intertwined, and most would agree that there is a strong regional character that ties them together. As stated in the introduction, the encyclopedia's creation was motivated by "the relation between the perennial idea of New England's fixed regional identity and the fact that life in the six states is constantly changing." Rather than a...


National Audubon Society Field Guide to New England
Peter Alden
0679446761
May 1998
Hardcover
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Book Review
If you're under the impression that the Northeast's natural beauty has given way to high-rises, condominiums, and suburban sprawl, this volume will certainly change your mind. In actuality, the area comprising Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont--New England, in short--is home to an abundance of flora and fauna, whether it be marine life below sea level or alpine meadows above the tree line. In fact, New England is nothing less than a naturalist's paradise. Much of the area has been scoured by glacial ice, leaving behind cirques, arêtes, and a fjord, all of which are featured in a geology section. Fossils are highlighted too, alerting readers to the presence of dinosaur footprints in both Hadley, Massachusetts and Rocky Hill, Connecticut. In addition, an easy-to-use field guide...


The Pale Horseman
Bernard Cornwell
0060787120
January 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Outnumbered Saxon forces continue battling Danish invaders in this rousing sequel to the bestselling The Last Kingdom. It's A.D. 877, and the dispossessed Northumbrian noble Uhtred has just routed the Danes in a battle at Cynuit in southern England. Logically, Uhtred should now ally himself with Alfred, whose Wessex kingdom alone has successfully resisted Danish control. But Uhtred sees a better chance of recovering his lost estate if he finds a way to join the Danes, who raised him and whose simple life of "ale, women, sword, and reputation" he finds more congenial than Alfred's Christian piety and military caution. But when the Danes invade Wessex, Uhtred's loyalties are further divided. His Celtic mistress foretells victory for Alfred, but Uhtred can scarcely believe that the bedraggled king, camped in...


Naval Submarine Base New London
David J. Bishop
0738538086
July 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
The first U.S. naval submarine base traces its origin to 1868, when the state of Connecticut and the city of New London granted the navy one hundred twelve acres of land across the Thames River in Groton. Naval Submarine Base New<br><br>London shows how this land developed from a depot for dry-docked ships and a coaling stationfor navy warships to its present designation as a submarine base. Nearly two hundred images depict the sailors and civilian workers who<br><br>together maintained, serviced, and staffed the submarines, shops, and offices in support of the growing submarine fleet.

About the Author
David J. Bishop compiled Naval Submarine Base New London from the archives of the Submarine Force Library and Museum and his personal collection....


Queen Emma and the Vikings
Harriet O'Brien
1582345961
Aug 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
While much remains unknown about Queen Emma as an individual, her story offers a fascinating entrance into the tumultuous world of late Anglo-Saxon England. Daughter of the duke of Normandy, descended just a few generations from Viking invaders, Emma (985–1062) was the wife of two kings (the English Aethelred and, later, his Danish Viking successor, Cnut), the mother of two kings and great-aunt of the Norman William the Conqueror. Despite her secondary status as a woman, Emma can be seen as a key factor in this momentous transitional period, serving as a source of stability and continuity in uncertain times. London-based journalist O'Brien provides a lively account of the harsh realities of war and politics in this era, the vagaries of political marriage and the thin line between invaders and settlers. She...


The Education of a Coach
David Halberstam
1401301541
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Pulitzer-winning journalist and author Halberstam focuses on Bill Belichick, one of the NFL's most successful coaches, and the game of football as a team sport with rich detail, exacting research and colorful anecdotes. He reveals what fans of the head coach of the New England Patriots have always known: the roots of Belichick's coaching lie in the essential mentoring by his father, an excellent teacher and college coach who taught his son how to scout players and teams, instructing the author on how to study films of players when he was just nine years old. As an assistant coach working with Bill Parcells's New York Giants in the 1980s, Belichick's "football first" credo was born of precision and discipline. He went on to guide the Patriots to win three Super Bowls in four years (2002, 2004 and 2005). Halberstam brings to his...


Queen Elizabeth's Wardrobe Unlock'd: The inventories of the Wardrobe of Robes prepared in July 1600, edited from Stowe MS 557 in the British Library, MS LR 2/121 in the Public Record Office, London, and MS V.b.72 in the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC
Janet Arnold
0901286206
October 2001
Hardcover
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A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Charles Dickens
1593083327
November 2004
Hardcover
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The Life of Elizabeth I
Alison Weir
0345425502
October 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
The long life and powerful personality of England's beloved Virgin Queen have eternal appeal, and popular historian Alison Weir depicts both with panache. She's especially good at evoking the physical texture of Tudor England: the elaborate royal gowns (actually an intricate assembly of separate fabric panels buttoned together over linen shifts), the luxurious but unhygienic palaces (Elizabeth got the only "close stool"; most members of her retinue relieved themselves in the courtyards), the huge meals heavily seasoned to disguise the taste of spoiled meat. Against this earthy backdrop, Elizabeth's intelligence and formidable political skills stand in vivid relief. She may have been autocratic, devious, even deceptive, but these traits were required to perform a 45-year tightrope walk between the two great powers of Europe,...


Changes in the Land
William Cronon
0809016346
Sept 2003
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
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Book Review
Much historical writing is far more concerned with the players than the stage: narratives of kings and cabbage-merchants, although acted out in fields and forests, typically include nature only as a convenient prop to provide the occasional splash of color. In Changes in the Land, Cronon treats the land of New England with the same sensitivity and attention to detail as the lives of the American natives and the colonists--he depicts the effects of changing land-use patterns on the texture of the New England landscape, and gives voice to the changing communities of trees, rock walls, and rivers. The chapter on the effects of changing notions of "property" on the ecology of New England are especially strong. Changes in the Land is almost the equal of Cronon's masterpiece, Nature's Metropolis, a monumental...


Lord John and the Private Matter
Diana Gabaldon
0385337485
October 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Trouble befalls Lord John Grey (fresh from minor roles in Gabaldon's bestselling Outlander novels) when he accidentally discovers that the Hon. Joseph Trevelyan, his cousin's betrothed, may have what those in 1757 termed "the pox" or "the French disease" syphilis. Before he can figure out an appropriate way to handle this delicate matter, he becomes involved in the investigation of the mysterious and grisly murder of a military colleague suspected of being a spy. Gabaldon (The Fiery Cross; Drums of Autumn; etc.) stitches these two plots together into a compelling narrative that also offers a wealth of juicy details about 18th-century London, especially its homosexual underbelly. Lord John, who reminisces about his dead lover, Hector, and the "lean, hard body" of an old flame, learns that Trevelyan may be...


The Roosevelts and the Royals
Will Swift
0471459623
June 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This melodramatically subtitled footnote to history by Swift, a longtime writer on royal history for Majesty magazine, focuses on the brief visits, in the summer of 1939, by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to Washington, D.C., and Hyde Park. Foreign visits by heads of state are carefully choreographed. This one was especially so, as the president was wheelchair-bound and the king, more withdrawn than his outgoing queen, was a stammerer and still new to his role as sovereign. On both sides of the Atlantic, the abdication of Edward VIII to marry a twice-divorced American was still deplored. The colorless George VI was on probation. Massive press hype—as well as diplomatic reticence—made the brief visits, which also included a stop at the New York World's Fair, a success. King George was still...


The Last Kingdom
Bernard Cornwell
0060530510
February 1, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Cornwell leaps back a millennium from his Richard Sharpe series to tell of the consolidation of England in the late ninth century and the role played by a young (fictional) warrior-in-training who's at the center of the war between Christian Englishmen and the pagan Danes. (Most of the other principal characters—Ubba, Guthrum, Ivar the Boneless and the like—are real historical figures.) Young Uhtred, who's English, falls under the control of Viking über-warrior Ragnar the Fearless when the Dane wipes out Uhtred's Northumberland family. Cornwell liberally feeds readers history and nuggets of battle data and customs, with Uhtred's first-person wonderment spinning all into a colorful journey of (self-)discovery. In a series of episodes, Ragnar conquers three of England's four kingdoms....


The People V. Harvard Law
Andrew Peyton Thomas
1893554988
Jan 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Polemicists in America's political wars often pick an institution (e.g. the media) and attack it for being dominated by an unwholesome ideology. Thomas, a warrior on the right, targets Harvard Law School, which he sees as in thrall to the mindless radicalism of the left and in particular to the ideology called critical legal studies. Adherents of this theory, according to Thomas, believe in tearing down the country's existing legal system and educating law students to become agents of leftist social change. The legal radicalism at Harvard was revealed most clearly, says Thomas, in 2002, through an incident in which two students and two professors made public statements regarded by black students as offensive. Protests and condemnations followed, leading to support for the adoption of a speech code at the law...


A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Charles Dickens
1593081383
August 2004
Paperback
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Inside Out : A Personal History of Pink Floyd
Nick Mason
0811848248
March 1, 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
The landmark British psychedelic band Pink Floyd's founding drummer limns the group, named after two early bluesmen, in a profusely illustrated coffee-table tome. The band's spacey arrangements, instrumentation, and light shows made it famous; the drug-burnout fate of original leader Syd Barrett, who was later institutionalized, helped, too. As Barrett's legend grew, his former colleagues moved the band closer to the rock mainstream and scored massive hits with such albums as Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall. Mason tracks the outfit's progress from the members' meeting in art school a la the Who, the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, and other revered British rockers. He details the band's journey from jazzy R & B to the psychedelic explorations that eventually dominated its output. Given Pink Floyd's erstwhile...


In Small Things Forgotten : An Archaeology of Early American Life
James Deetz
0385483996
August 1, 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
History is recorded in many ways. According to  author James Deetz, the past can be seen most fully  by studying the small things so often forgotten.  Objects such as doorways, gravestones, musical  instruments, and even shards of pottery fill in the  cracks between large historical events and depict  the intricacies of daily life. In his completely  revised and expanded edition of In Small  Things Forgotten, Deetz has added new  sections that more fully acknowledge the presence  of women and African Americans in Colonial  America. New interpretations of archaeological finds  detail how minorities influenced and were affected  by the development of the Anglo-American...


Entertaining Satan
John Putnam Demos
0195174836
Sept 2004
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
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Book Description
In the first edition of the Bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft. By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England
during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture. Now Demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today. He provides a new
preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present.


Walden and Civil Disobedience (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Henry David Thoreau
1593081995
October 2004
Hardcover
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Hippie
Barry Miles
1402714424
August 1, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Biographer of Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac and the Beat Movement itself, Miles broadens his scope to the years 1965 through 1971, a time that "really was about sex and drugs and rock ’n’ roll." This massive catalog tries to cram it all in, with quotes from groovy personalities (Timothy Leary, John Lennon, Ken Kesey, Wavy Gravy, Abbie Hoffman, Grace Slick, Frank Zappa), posters and album sleeves (Buffalo Springfield, the Doors, Big Brother and the Holding Company), period photographs (antiwar protests, love-ins, mobile communes, Haight-Ashbury), and stray ephemera (a napkin from the Whiskey A Go Go). Musicians take precedence over artists: readers looking for Peter Max or R. Crumb won’t even find them in the index. Despite the tremendous assemblage, the volume lacks a coherent...

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