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In Siberia
Colin Thubron
006095373X
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
In Siberia explores a region of astonishments, where "white cranes dance on the permafrost, where a great city floats lost among the ice floes, where mammoths sleep under glaciers." Colin Thubron's latest chronicle also delivers its subject from rumor into reality. An expanse larger than the entire United States, Siberia is undoubtedly a country of contrasts, which elicits from the author both awe and melancholy. Here on one hand is a northern wilderness "shattered into a jigsaw of ponds and streams," and on the other a "black detritus of factories and ruins." No less memorable than the landscape are the people that Thubron encounters. He gathers their stories like rough jewels, showing us a self-proclaimed descendant of Rasputin, an isolated Jewish community, and a parade of "indestructible babushkas."

Woven among the...



Siberia: Worlds Apart
Victor L. Mote
0813318378
March 1998
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Known to most as a realm of exile and labor camps, Siberia is also one of the world's wealthiest resource bases and constitutes nearly three-quarters of Russia's territory. In this comprehensive book, Victor Mote illuminates the dichotomies between Siberia's treasurehouse of resources, its scanty population, and its peripheral relationship to the rest of the world. Tracing the region's history from the Stone Age to the present, he explores the geography, ethnography, economics, and politics of Siberia and its people, providing a multidisciplinary perspective for scholars and general readers alike interested in Eurasia's "forgotten quarter." LONG DESCRIPTION BEGINS HERE


Between Heaven and Hell: The Myth of Siberia in Russian Culture
Gayla Diment (Editor)
0312060726
January 1993
Textbook Hardcover
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Book Description
Siberia has no history of independent political existence, no claim to a separate ethnic identity, and no clear borders. Yet, it could be said that the elusive country 'behind the Urals' is the most real and the most durable part of the Russian landscape. For centuries, Siberia has been represented as Russia's alter ego,as the heavenly or infernal antithesis to the perceived complexity or shallowness of Russian life. It has been both the frightening heart of darkness and a fabulous land of plenty; the 'House of the Dead' and the realm of utter freedom; a frozen wasteland and a colourful frontier; a dumping ground for Russia's rejects and the last refuge of its lost innocence. The contributors to Between Heaven and Hell examine the origin, nature, and implications of these images from historical, literary, geographical,...


Lost Heart of Asia
Colin Thubron
0060926562
January 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
West of China, south of Russia, hemmed in by mountains, steppe, and desert, lie the five Central Asian republics of the former Soviet Union. Cut loose from Moscow in the early '90s, the five "Stans" (Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan) discover that their newly found freedom plays tug-o-war with despair and a nostalgia for the certainties of the Soviet past. It's during this time that author Colin Thubron travels the width of central Asia, asking questions about the past, present, and future. Not content to simply bounce from place to place, Thubron travels from person to person, uncovering their many vibrant stories and developing a deep understanding of the area's lesser-known history. Kyrgyz and Uzbeks debate the place of Islam. Koreans and Germans, descendants from forced migrants, wonder if...


History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990
James Forsyth
0521477719
December 1994
Textbook Paperback
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Review
'James Forsyth's work ... is very timely. Just when the world is becoming aware of Siberia's peoples, we are presented with a compendium of information relating to them. The scope is vast.' The Historical Association Journal
' ... (an) extremely useful, introduction to a subject that, as Russia's centre of gravity shifts east, will become very important.' Norman Stone, Aberdeen University Review
'Forsyth's book is imperative for anyone interested in Russian or world history, and would appeal to specialists and non-specialists alike.' Canadian-American Slavic Studies

Review
"...performs a vital task by synthesizing multivolume ethnographic and historical works of German, imperial Russian, and Soviet scholars in one volume." Choice

"James Forsyth's monumental undertaking helps...



The Conquest of a Continent
W. Bruce Lincoln
0801489229
May 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Russia's conquest of Siberia, begun in 1582 with Cossack chieftan Ermak Timofevich's crushing of the Tatars, transformed the obscure kingdom of Muscovy into the world's larget contiguous empire. To Siberia's native nomads, hunters and reindeer herders, the conquest brought cruel exploitation, torture and corruption under military governors. Three and a half centuries later, the industrial complex that Stalin built east of the Urals manufactured the tanks, planes and guns that defeated Hitler, and Stalin's Siberian slave labor camps swallowed up millions of innocents. Its fragile ecology devastated by industrializers Khrushchev and Brezhnev, Siberia is today one of the world's worst environmental disaster zones. In Lincoln's ( In War's Dark Shadow ) compulsively readable epic narrative, Siberia's dark history...


White Terror: Cossack Warlords of the Trans-Siberian
Jamie Bisher
0714656909
February 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
In the last days of 1917, a fugitive Cossack captain brashly led seven cohorts into a mutinous garrison at Manchuli, a squalid bordertown on Russia's frontier with Manchuria. The garrison had gone Red, revolted against its officers, and become a dangerous, ill-disciplined mob. Nevertheless, Cossack Captain Grigori Semionov cleverly harangued the garrison into laying down its arms and boarding a train that carried it back into the Bolsheviks' tenuous territory. Through such bold action, Semionov and a handful of young Cossack brethren established themselves as the warlords of Eastern Siberia and Russia's Pacific maritime provinces during the next bloody year. Like inland pirates, they menaced the Trans-Siberian Railroad with fleets of armored trains, Cossack cavalry, mercenaries and pressgang cannon fodder. They...


Remembering a Forgotten War
Serge P. Petroff
0880334584
Dec 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
Combining history and analysis, Petroff traces the course of the Russian Civil War that was waged east of the Volga River in Siberia. He asserts that the Russian Civil War in the east was not solely a Siberian experience, but rather influenced by various anti-Bolshevik military uprisings that acted independent of Siberia's "White" army. Utilizing biographical portraits of protagonists from both sides of the conflict, Petroff examines the coup that brought Kolchak to power, the social and political synthesis and military strengths of the White and Red armies, the popular uprisings that plagued both White and Bolshevik governments and the benefits and misfortunes of allied intervention. Also included is a complete accounting of the Russian gold seized by the Whites and the Czechoslovak Legion, as well as a commentary on...


After the U. S. S. R.: Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Politics in the Commonwealth of Independent States
Anatoly M. Khazanov
0299148947
August 1996
Paperback
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John A. Hall, author of Powers and Liberties
"A major book from one of the greatest social scientists now at work. An astonishing amount of anthropological fieldwork married to first-hand experience of life under communist rule makes this the most authoritative book now available on its subject. This important contribution to modern social understanding should be required reading for policy makers."-John A. Hall, author of Powers and Liberties

M. Crawford Young, author of The Politics of Cultural Pluralism
"This book will at once win acclaim as one of the ablest and most authoritative treatments of the 'national question' ever written."-M. Crawford Young, author of The Politics of Cultural Pluralism

See all Editorial Reviews


Rediscovering Russia in Asia
Stephen Kotkin
1563245469
July 1995
Hardcover
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After the U. S. S. R.: Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Politics in the Commonwealth of Independent States
Anatoly M. Khazanov
0299148904
November 1995
Hardcover
·
 
ohn A. Hall, author of Powers and Liberties
"A major book from one of the greatest social scientists now at work. An astonishing amount of anthropological fieldwork married to first-hand experience of life under communist rule makes this the most authoritative book now available on its subject. This important contribution to modern social understanding should be required reading for policy makers."-John A. Hall, author of Powers and Liberties

M. Crawford Young, author of The Politics of Cultural Pluralism
"This book will at once win acclaim as one of the ablest and most authoritative treatments of the 'national question' ever written."-M. Crawford Young, author of The Politics of Cultural Pluralism

See all Editorial Reviews


Museum at the End of the World: Encounters in the Russian Far East
Alexia Bloch
0812218787
June 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
A little over a century ago the American Museum of Natural History launched its ambitious Jesup North Pacific Expedition to learn more about the peoples inhabiting the remote easternmost extension of Siberia and the northwest coast of North America. In The Museum at the End of the World: Encounters in the Russian Far East, anthropologists Alexia Bloch and Laurel Kendall tell the story of their journey through this same part of the world in 1998, retracing the old expedition as they link the expedition legacy of artifacts, photographs, and archival material from the museum in New York to the present-day descendants of its subjects.Contrasting the time of the Jesup expedition with their own travel, the authors reveal a physical and cultural landscape that was profoundly shaken over the past century, first by...


The Museum at the End of the World: Encounters in the Russian Far East
Alexia Bloch
0812237994
June 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
A little over a century ago the American Museum of Natural History launched its ambitious Jesup North Pacific Expedition to learn more about the peoples inhabiting the remote easternmost extension of Siberia and the northwest coast of North America. In The Museum at the End of the World: Encounters in the Russian Far East, anthropologists Alexia Bloch and Laurel Kendall tell the story of their journey through this same part of the world in 1998, retracing the old expedition as they link the expedition legacy of artifacts, photographs, and archival material from the museum in New York to the present-day descendants of its subjects.Contrasting the time of the Jesup expedition with their own travel, the authors reveal a physical and cultural landscape that was profoundly shaken over the past century, first by...

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