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Nazi Policy, Jewish Workers, German Killers

052177490X


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From Booklist
Of four previous books, Browning is best known for Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland (1992), a study of how it was possible for ordinary, middle-aged men to become mass murderers. His latest book is the result of six lectures given at Cambridge University, in which he examined three issues at the forefront of Holocaust scholarship: the decision-making and policy-making at the heart of the Nazi regime, out of which emerged the "final solution," the systematic attempt to murder all the Jews of Europe; the pragmatic and temporary use of Jewish labor; and the attitudes, motivations, and adaptations of the "ordinary" Germans who implemented Nazi policy at the local level. The source materials include both postwar testimonies and rare contemporary letters and document files that...


The Book Thief
Markus Zusak
0375831002
March 2006
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 9 Up–Zusak has created a work that deserves the attention of sophisticated teen and adult readers. Death himself narrates the World War II-era story of Liesel Meminger from the time she is taken, at age nine, to live in Molching, Germany, with a foster family in a working-class neighborhood of tough kids, acid-tongued mothers, and loving fathers who earn their living by the work of their hands. The child arrives having just stolen her first book–although she has not yet learned how to read–and her foster father uses it, The Gravediggers Handbook, to lull her to sleep when shes roused by regular nightmares about her younger brothers death. Across the ensuing years of the late 1930s and into the 1940s, Liesel collects more stolen books as well as a peculiar set of...


Shadow Divers
Robert Kurson
0345482476
May 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Kurson's chronicle of an extraordinary deep-sea discovery makes for a captivating audio experience. In 1991, divers John Chatterton and Rich Kohler came across the buried remains of a German submarine just off the coast of New Jersey. Unable to identify the ship and mystified as to its origins, the two men became obsessed with learning where the U-boat came from and what brought it to the bottom of the sea. Although the story's set-up, which comprises most of the first disc, drags, the pace picks up when the partners begin traveling the world, digging up clues. Reader Scott uses character voices but keeps them subdued, even when dealing with the salty language of the seamen. This is a wise move, since there's plenty of drama inherent in the text; lengthy and detailed passages describing deep-water dives, and the...


1634: The Ram Rebellion (Assiti Shards)
Eric Flint
1416520600
April 25, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Thirty Years War continues to ravage 17th century Europe, but a new force is gathering power and influence: the Confederated Principalities of Europe, an alliance between Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, and the West Virginians from the 20th century led by Mike Stearns who were hurled centuries into the past by a mysterious cosmic accident. Inspired by the example of American freedom and justice, a movement in Franconia among the peasants, who have revolted several times even before the arrival from the future of the town of Grantville, an independent revolutionary movement has arisen, flying the banner of the head of a ram. The West Virginians fully approve of liberating the peasants from the nobility, but they are also aware of how revolutionary movements can lead to bloodbaths. And avoiding that deadly...


Map of Bones
James Rollins
0060765240
April 2006
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
A mysterious biblical object, nefarious Vatican spies and a deadly centuries-old religious cabal—sound familiar? Sacramento veterinarian Rollins offers more Da Vinci Code–style thrills for the seriously addicted. In this seventh outing, hooded men invade midnight mass at the Cologne Cathedral and slaughter almost everyone present, then break open a gold sarcophagus and steal... the bones of the Three Wise Men. Grayson Pierce, top agent in the Department of Defense's covert Sigma Force, takes a team to Rome, joins up with love-interest Rachel Verona, a carabinieri corps lieutenant, and her Vatican official uncle, Vigot. It seems that the Dragon Court, a medieval alchemical cult-cell that still operates within the Catholic Church, is to blame, and it also seems that the bones of the Magi aren't really...


Rise and Fall of the Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany
William L. Shirer
0671728687
November 1990
Paperback
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Review
Orville PrescottThe New York TimesOne of the most important works of history of our time.
Hugh Trevor-RoperThe New York Times Book ReviewA splendid work of scholarship, objective in method, sound in judgment, inescapable in its conclusions.
Theodore H. WhiteA monumental work, a grisly and thrilling story.
John GuntherOne of the most spectacular stories ever told.

Review
John Gunther One of the most spectacular stories ever told.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Third Reich in Power, 1933-1939
Richard J. Evans
1594200742
Nov 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
The second work in a planned three-volume series (after 2004's Coming of the Third Reich) this book starts with the Nazis' complete assumption of power and creation of a one-party state in 1933, and goes to September 1939 and the beginning of World War II. In sharp detail, Evans shows how Hitler seized upon his political victory and immediately began his plan for the Nazi infiltration of every aspect of German society. The Nazi propaganda blitz covered everything from local councils to social clubs to all voluntary associations. And when propaganda didn't work, coercion and fear did. At the behest of Hitler, the brownshirts and SS (secret police) ruthlessly harassed, beat, and murdered the Jews and Communists first, but later targeted anyone who showed even the slightest criticism of Nazi activities. Those Germans who...


In the Name of the Volk: Political Justice in Hitler's Germany
H. W. Koch
0760704082
April 1997
Hardcover
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A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City--A Diary
Philip Boehm (Translator)
0805075402
August 4, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Anonymous, then a 34-year-old journalist, started this eight-week diary in April 1945, when the Russians were invading Berlin and the city's mostly female population was heading to its cellars to wait out the bombing. Anyone who was able looted abandoned buildings for food of any kind. Soon the Russians were everywhere; liquored-up Russian soldiers raped women indiscriminately. After being raped herself, Anonymous decided to "find a single wolf to keep away the pack." Thanks to a small series of Russian officers, she was better fed and better protected at night. Her story illustrates the horror war brings to the lives of women when the battles are waged near a home front (rather than a traditional battlefield). In retrospect, she advises women victimized by mass rape to talk to each other...


Doctors from Hell
Vivien Spitz
1591810329
May 2005
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Spitz reported the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials in Germany from 1946 to 1948 for the U.S. War Department. In writing her book, she worked from a condensed transcript of the 11,538-page court reporters' record, which she helped prepare. Her horrendous story of evil--and ultimate justice--covers the trials of 20 doctors and three medical assistants charged with crimes against humanity and calculated genocide. She recounts experiments in which concentration-camp inmates were forced into high-altitude chambers and sent to 68,000 feet without oxygen; the suffering of inmates forced to undergo freezing experiments in tanks of ice water until they died; malaria experiments on 1,200 inmates; and experiments in which inmates were artificially wounded and infected with mustard gas. There were sulfanilamide experiments conducted on...


Destined to Witness
Hans J. Massaquoi
0060959614
Feb 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In a unique addition to the literature of life under the Third Reich, Massaquoi, a former managing editor of Ebony magazine, chronicles his life as the son of a German nurse and Al-Haj Massaquoi, the son of the Liberian consul general to Germany. Soon after his birth in Hamburg in 1926, the author's father returned to Liberia to bolster his family's failing stature in national politics, leaving his wife and son to grapple with everyday life amid the rise of fascism in Germany. The Reich's racial politics were so steadfastly drummed into German schoolchildren that the young Hans quickly acquired an anti-Semitic outlook only to realize that he was also subject to discrimination as a non-Aryan. He sought intellectual escape from German nationalism through reading books by Jules Verne, Arthur Conan Doyle and James...


The Amber Room
Steve Berry
0345460049
August 2004
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
First-time novelist Berry weighs in with a hefty thriller that's long on interesting research but short on thrills. Atlanta judge Rachel Cutler and ex-husband Paul are divorced but still care for each other. Rachel's father, Karol Borya, knows secrets about the famed Amber Room, a massive set of intricately carved panels crafted from the precious substance and looted by Nazis during WWII from Russia's Catherine Palace. The disappearance of the panels, which together formed a room, remains one of the world's greatest unsolved art mysteries. Borya's secret gets him killed as two European industrialists/art collectors go head to head in a deadly race to find the fabled room. Searching for Borya's killer, Rachel and Paul bumble their way to Europe, where their naivet‚ triggers more deaths. Berry has obviously...


Slaughterhouse: The Handbook of the Eastern Front
David Glantz (Contributor), et al
097176509X
November 7, 2004
Paperback
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Armchair General, September 2005
"An outstanding resource for those interested in all aspects of World War II's brutal Eastern Front."

World War II History Magazine, January 2006
"A jewel of a book...an authoritative and indispensable reference that will be welcomed by every WWII historian and enthusiast."

See all Editorial Reviews


Hitler's War: Germany's Key Strategic Decisions 1940-1945
Heinz Magenheimer
076073531X
May 2002
Hardcover
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Torpedo Junction
Homer H. Hickam
0440210275
Apr 1991
Paperback
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Review
"The best account to date of America's early war against the U-Boat."
--The Journal of Military History

"Homer Hickam is a gifted storyteller...the reader is transported back to those crucial battles at sea to live and die with those seamen."
--The Times-Herald(Newport News, Va.)

"A dramatic end detailed account."
--West Coast Review of Books

Review
"The best account to date of America's early war against the U-Boat."
--The Journal of Military History

"Homer Hickam is a gifted storyteller...the reader is transported back to those crucial battles at sea to live and die with those seamen."
--The Times-Herald(Newport News, Va.)

"A dramatic end detailed account."
--West Coast...


The Hiding Place
Corrie Ten Boom, John Scherrill
0553256696
November 1, 1984
Mass Market Paperback
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From AudioFile
Corrie ten Boom was a leader in the Dutch Underground during WWII. With the aid of her family, she hid scores of Jews from the Nazi invaders. She was arrested along with every member of her family, spending the remaining war years in concentration camps. Nadia May does great credit to the writers of this true story. She reads with simplicity and a lack of histrionics. Her emotional control makes the tension and horror of the family's plight more real and hideous. Her vocal range is expansive as is her ability to speak with diverse foreign accents. The listener is left with a story of extraordinary humanity, goodness and overwhelming love. J.P. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Book Description
Corrie Ten Boom stood...


Lessons from the Great Depression (Lionel Robbins Lectures)
Peter Temin
0262700441
October 8, 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
Do events of the 1930s carry a message for the 1990s? Lessons from the Great Depression provides an integrated view of the depression, covering the experience in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States. It describes the causes of the depression, why it was so widespread and prolonged, and what brought about eventual recovery.

Peter Temin also finds parallels in recent history, in the relentless deflationary course followed by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board and the British government in the early 1980s, and in the dogged adherence by the Reagan administration to policies generated by a discredited economic theory - supply-side economics.

Peter Temin is Professor of Economics at MIT.


Traveller's History of Germany
Robert Cole
1566565324
July 2004
Paperback
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Let Me Go
Helga Schneider
0802714358
May 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Schneider, who was born in Poland in 1937 and grew up in Berlin, shares the last encounter with her mother in Austria, after decades of separation, as readers become privy to her complex autobiography. In 1941, when Schneider was four, her mother abandoned her, her brother and her father to join the SS army in various concentration camps, including Auschwitz, and visited the family only once after leaving. Thirty years later, working as a writer in Italy, Schneider learns of the old woman's quickly deteriorating health and decidesâ€"albeit hesitantlyâ€"to pay her a visit. Schneider attempts to reconcile her ambivalent emotions toward a mother who unfalteringly announces, "Well, my daughter, like it or not, I have never regretted being a member of the Waffen SS, is that clear?" Schneider's...


Mein Kampf
Adolf Hitler
0395925037
September 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
The angry ranting of an obscure, small-party politician, the first volume of Mein Kampf was virtually ignored when it was originally published in 1925. Likewise the second volume, which appeared in 1926. The book details Hitler's childhood, the "betrayal" of Germany in World War I, the desire for revenge against France, the need for lebensraum for the German people, and the means by which the National Socialist party can gain power. It also includes Hitler's racist agenda and his glorification of the "Aryan" race. The few outside the Nazi party who read it dismissed it as nonsense, not believing that anyone could--or would--carry out its radical, terrorist programs. As Hitler and the Nazis gained power, first party members and then the general public were pressured to buy the book. By the time Hitler became chancellor of the...


Evening in the Palace of Reason
James R. Gaines
0007156588
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
In his lively history, Evening in the Palace of Reason, James R. Gaines sets two remarkable--and remarkably different--historical figures on a collision course toward a single night in Potsdam in 1747: the composer Johann Sebastian Bach--"old Bach," as he was called then at the age of 62--and the still-young Prussian king, Frederick II, already known as Frederick the Great after less than a decade on the throne. Having long employed old Bach's son Carl--a more celebrated composer at the time--Frederick summoned the father from Leipzig and challenged him, with an offhanded cruelty, to a public compositional puzzle designed to humiliate the great wizard of the waning art of counterpoint.

Gaines is a pleasant guide through the incestuous patchwork monarchies of middle Europe, with a breezy tone fitting for a former editor...



June 1941 : Hitler and Stalin
John Lukacs
0300114370
April 28, 2006
Hardcover
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Review
Henry Kissinger : "John Lukacs's June 1941: Hitler and Stalin is one of the fullest and most authoritative portraits of the ambiguous relationship between the two powerful and wily adversaries during World War II's watershed year. Drawing on newly available source material from the diaries, personal papers and post-war interviews of senior staff members close to each, it is a fascinating and masterfully researched book."-Henry Kissinger
Henry Kissinger : "A fascinating and masterfully researched book."-Henry Kissinger
Simon Sebag Montefiore :  "John Lukacs's latest work, June 1941, showcases the worldliness, strategic wisdom and superb eye for the personal detail that has made him one of our most experienced, readable and sophisticated historians of the WW2 era."-Simon Sebag Montefiore, author of...


The Hitler Book
Henrik Eberle
1586483668
Nov 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Even after Hitler's death, Stalin remained so intrigued by his nemesis that he commissioned a top-secret dossier detailing every aspect of the late dictator's private life, political behavior and personality. The result—File No. 462a, now known as The Hitler Book—was discovered hidden in the Soviet archives just two years ago by Uhl, of the Institute of Contemporary History in Munich and Berlin, who presents it with Eberle, a historian at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Much of its material was extracted, not entirely voluntarily, from two of Hitler's captured SS aides, though one should avoid taking all their gossip too literally, for the book reveals as much about the Soviet mentality as about the German. The dossier's authors, after all, appreciated the regime's need to present Hitler as...


Hitler Warned Us: The Nazis' Master Plan for a Master Race
John Laffin
0760707898
February 1998
Hardcover
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A Mighty Fortress
Steven E. Ozment
0060934832
Feb 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
It takes erudition and verve to attempt a history that covers the life of a controversial people over two millennia. Harvard historian Ozment has plenty of both, yet the result is oddly unsatisfactory. Ozment (The Burgermeister's Daughter, etc.) quickly and wisely dismisses any notion that a history of Germany must be focused on the Third Reich. Instead, the travails of political disunity serve as his narrative anchor. Neither the ancient Germanic tribes nor their medieval and early modern successors could forge any long-lasting unity. Only under Bismarck did a unified political entity emerge, and it soon succumbed to visions of grandeur that resulted in two world wars and a Holocaust, renewed territorial losses and political divisions. Ozment's focus on disunity provides narrative coherence to a long,...


Among the Dead Cities: The History and Moral Legacy of the WWII Bombing of Civilians in Germany and Japan
A. C. Grayling
0802714714
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. The Allied bombing of Axis cities, which killed hundreds of thousands of civilians and made smoking ruins of Dresden, Tokyo and Hiroshima, remains one of the great controversies of WWII; this probing study does the issue full justice. Philosophy professor Grayling (The Meaning of Things) focuses on Britain's "area bombing" of entire German cities, a strategy adopted initially because bombers couldn't hit smaller sites and then, as attitudes hardened, continued as a deliberate attack on civilian morale. Grayling scrupulously considers the justifications for area bombing—that it would shorten the conflict by destroying Germany's economy and will to resist, that civilian workers were also combatants or that it was simply the rough justice of war—and finds them wanting. British...


Waffen-SS Encyclopedia
Marc J. Rikmenspoel
0971765081
November 5, 2004
Paperback
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Stone & Stone Second World War Books (December 2004)
"For a single volume reference work on the SS, this is probably the best book to put on your shelf."

Broadsword Military Magazine, March-April 2005
"[Not another book] about the "SS cult fetish"...[this is] a one-stop reference worth its spot on the bookshelf."

See all Editorial Reviews

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